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22

It might be slightly more economical, but it also might be slightly worse for your health. Hot water dissolves plumbing (pipes, valves, fixtures, etc.) much faster, and what it dissolves is in the water. Lead is specifically of concern, particularly with homes prior to 1986 and with infants. There's a NY Times article that sums it up nicely with sources.


15

Economically, the difference is irrelevant. Let's say you need to boil one liter of water. The specific heat of water is about 4.2 joule per gram degree Celsius. Meaning, for every gram of water that we want to make hotter by one °C, we must supply one joule of energy. A liter is 1000 grams, and let's say the cold water starts at 15°C, and we want to go to ...


12

Still chlorinated, but if handling chemicals is the issue, how about a salt water pool? The alternative I've seen pushed is copper-oxygen system. I can't say how effective it is, but last I checked it is not approved by the EPA for sanitizing water. I've also read that they take more attention and care. Just based on experience having a pool in full ...


10

Get a professional. Asbestos dust is a real killer, and frankly it's not worth the risk of residual dust - especially if you have young childeren. In Australia the Queensland government even have a "Dob in a neighbour" program if you think that someone is doing DIY asbestos handeling. That's how serious it is.


9

My grandfather was a carpenter and when he retired he moved most of his tools into his basement. This included a drill press, bandsaw, and a very heavy full size table saw. It is definitely doable. Drill presses and bandsaws don't generally create as much dust as sanders and routers. You can probably remove most of the dust they'd create with a well placed ...


9

Expanding foam. It seems like every time I grab a can of it, I somehow convince myself that I will be very careful and not touch any of it until after it has dried. I always end up with it on my hands/clothes. I spend the next 15 minutes with a bottle of acetone promising myself that I will wear disposable gloves next time.


9

It's not really that serious in most cases. In tile or siding, it isn't a hazard unless it is broken down, generating dust that you are breathing. Even then, a lot of tile is like 1% asbestos. If you can get it up without breaking it too much, you're basically fine. Pipe insulation that is soft is more of a problem. You can probably do it yourself if it's a ...


9

Economically, yes it costs less to start with hot water. However, you should use cold water anytime you need potable water. Hot water tanks are generally pretty filthy. If you were to drain your tank, you would probably be disgusted to see what comes out. Cleaning your hot water tank is something that every home owner should do, but very few do. Also, ...


8

Salt pool and baquasil are your two best options. (although technically salt is chlorine) Remember, you're trying to kill all living things in the pool. "no chemicals" and "no living things" tend to be mutually exclusive.


8

There are many DIY air quality test kits available, that might be the best place to start. This one checks for bacteria on HVAC filters and vents. This one from AirLab actually samples the air to test, though it is a bit pricey. You could also call a professional to come in and test the quality of the air in your home, this can be expensive so I would ...


8

Compared to holding a mobile phone against your head, the exposure levels are very low. So, even if non-ionizing radiation is found to be a health concern in the future (current studies show no reason for concern), wifi isn't going to be the primary source of exposure for most people. If you are concerned, locate your router somewhere other than directly ...


7

I have my entire woodworking workshop in my basement. Plenty of people have basement workshops. Just get a portable dust collector like this one: Get good filter bags that filter down to at least 5 microns, smaller is better. And a remote controlled air filtration system like this one to hang from the ceiling. Drill presses make very little dust. ...


7

There is no detectable effect. In double blind studies where people who claim to be sensitive to electric fields have tried to detect whether a wi-fi source is on or off their results have been no better than chance. What does affect their health is their anxiety over possible health effects. This isn't to belittle that as anxiety can cause real health ...


7

Cement (the active component of concrete) is a base (an alkali) that can be irritating to skin. It is not very strong and should not be a problem on all but sensitive skin, if the exposure is short or intermittent. It could be very irritating to eyes and nasal passages if there is a lot of exposure. Gloves are not a bad idea (e.g., disposable nitrile) but ...


6

I don't think it is much of an issue with individual materials. In general most of them last a long time, and when they do fail, they simply get replaced. Of course, it can be a problem if the item that is failing cannot easily be replaced. Off the top of my head I think the only issue could be the foundation. Many homes built that long ago did not ...


5

The home lead testing kits are very accurate if used properly, but only spot check. I buy these same kits in boxes of 50 for home inspections. If you are concerned about widespread lead, you need to have an electronic scan dome by a pro. This type of electronic camera can detect lead in walls, trim, interior or exterior and can cover an entire house in ...


5

There are thousands of species of mold known to Science, with different species being found in different parts of the world. There isn't any one "crawlspace" mold or "air duct" mold, it's just whatever spores of whatever species happened to take a foothold there. Which one is more dangerous will depend on the particular species of mold and the sensitivity ...


5

You are correct regarding the dust filters... in fact the "caking" particles can sometimes improve filtration... so the cartridges only need to be replaced when damaged, soiled or when they unacceptably obstruct breathing. As for chemical filters... this depends a great deal on the chemicals being dealt with, as each will have different properties. Each ...


5

Corrosive? You bet. Wet concrete can cause chemical burns, 3rd degree burns, cause blindness if gotten in the eyes. Wear gloves no matter how often you use concrete. Now, unless you like what your skin turns to when working with concrete without gloves, go ahead.


5

"Asbestos in the ceiling' is rather vague. Are they referring to the ceiling itself? Popcorn texturing? Insulation above the ceiling? As for the danger level of asbestos, it all depends on if it is airborne or not. In its solid state, it's harmless. It's only when it's friable and turns to dust and you inhale it does it become dangerous. Even then, note ...


5

If you already have hot water, that you have paid to have heated, and which you would otherwise not use, you will gain time and money by using it. The amount gained is likely to be very small.


4

Mold detection and identification can be done in two ways. Visible mold can be collected on a test tape, and air borne spores can be collected with an air sample kit. Either way, samples must be sent to a lab for microscopic inspection and ID. Mold and mold spores can range from common everyday varieties that rarely have negative effects on humans to very ...


4

Mineral Spirits Roofing tar in a caulk tube Gasoline to name a few. I used to not wear gloves until I discovered that my local drugstore sells latex gloves for next to nothing (I think $2-3 per box of 100). So now I use em for almost everything from painting to changing the oil in my tractor .... but I keep a supply of GoJo Orange with pumice handy ..... ...


4

It boils down to maintenance. There are tons of houses in northeast that 300+ old. Some brick and some wooden. So if the house was properly kept then I don't think it has a pre determined lifespan. However, specific building materials do have known time in service before they would require repair. For example bricks might need to e repointed every 50 years ...


4

The lifespan of a structure has little to do with age in general. It's mostly a combination of: materials construction quality maintenance/upkeep climate


4

As you can see from the other answers, there is a range of opinions. I have observed that some people handle concrete bare-handed without trouble, while others' skin reacts very badly. For example, my neighbor got sores very fast with exposure to concrete while setting fence posts. And I've heard reports that these types of sores heal very slowly. If you ...


4

Please, please wear gloves! Especially if you are a DIYer, and will be working on a project that involves any more than two pounds of cement. I did not listen to the warning, and worked with the wet cement without gloves. We were filling the bottom of a pond that had cracked, and spent about 5 hours across two days working. I didn't notice anything at all ...


4

Varnish is usually a mixture of a drying oil, some resin such as pine tar, and a solvent such as turpentine. The drying oil most likely won't kill you. The most commonly used oil, linseed oil, is actually just non-food-grade flax oil by another name. The Greeks put pine tar in their wine, and it's a tasty treat. The solvent is a little more troublesome. ...


4

Yes you can paint them with high heat BBQ grill paint. You can find this paint at any hardware store, walmart or lowes etc. It is rated for 1400 degrees normally. Be aware, however, that the surface in contact with your pans will wear off fairly quickly. I personally would paint the grates, then burnish the paint off where it makes contact with the pans so ...


4

Given the direct flame exposure, and that the flames are actually quite a bit hotter than BBQ paint is rated for (1950C for natural gas, 2392C for propane) I'd suggest sticking to clean, coat with vegetable oil (wipe on a thin layer) and bake. This makes a pretty good finish, and does not involve anything that's not going to happen in normal food preparation ...



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