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You could also just install wall plugs onto your floor, and leave spaces around the laminate board. I would presume that your laminate floor in your cupboard does not receive too much heat and sun variation (since its in the cupboard), hence movement would not be as much as those boards which receive direct sun. So, to proceed, with a wood/steel bit, drill ...


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Laminate flooring is made to move when needed, so screwing through to the subfloor under the laminate may not do the floor well. Since sliding doors do not exert a lot of pressure at the guides on the bottom, you could size the screw to only secure itself into the laminate itself, say no more than 1/2" long screws, considering the laminate should be about ...


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I would take out a baseboard and see if you can pull a board up a little or use a small mirror to see the side of a board. They should be spaced away from the wall enough to see. Engineered hardwood usually has 1/8" or less of said wood with backing. You cannot in almost all cases sand engineered hardwood. I have never ran across engineered that can be ...


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Both may be correct: "Engineered" floors often have a fairly thin, yet substantial, amount of hardwood laminated over a base of cheaper wood. This section can be as much as 3/8" thick, and can be sanded (carefully!) several times before hitting the laminated section. Apart from the methods suggested previously, you can wait for winter, when solid ...


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You need to find an area where you can inspect the side of the boards. If there are floor registers, remove one and inspect. If you don't have those, look for areas around doors other areas where you might be able to easily remove a trim to inspect. Worst case, you will need to remove a floor molding to inspect. Also height will give you a clue. 1/2 to ...


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Without knowing the specific end use and history of the wood or the scale of the project I can only give you three general techniques and you can choose which one suits your needs best. Paste Filler. This comes in a variety of forms but essentially its exactly what it sounds like. It hardens to a sand-able surface, takes stain and finish more like wood ...


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Give the area a wipe over so it's slightly damp, then with a very fine paint brush trace the circle with a very fine line of household bleach. Once the stain has faded quickly remove all of the bleach. You may then need to re oil the area.


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Although my floor was in much worse shape, vacillation between replacing or refinishing. I ended up having them refinished by a company I found online. They were able to sand the wear and the scratches so that when the poly dried it was like a brand new floor. So I would definitely recommend sanding, if nothing more than to even out scratches a bit. I'm also ...



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