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12

I have done both a refinish and a new install, and did a bunch of research before choosing. These are my generalized conclusions about the different choices: Linseed / Tung Oil Pros: Easy to apply Relatively durable Quick curing and drying times Cons: Will darken with age Provides very little protection against wood ...


8

For this sort of residue, I highly recommend GooGone. Mineral spirits, and Naptha will work, but the fumes they give off are much worse. You should also do a test area first, in case the chemicals you're using causes problems with the original surface (removes it too, stains it, etc.) You might be able to speed things up with a hair dryer (not a heat gun, ...


7

Often permanent markers can be removed with isopropyl alcohol. First, assuming you still have the markers, I'd try using this to remove it from a test surface. If it works, then try on the bottom of your table to ensure it does not damage the finish. If it is safe, then use it to try and remove the marker from your table.


7

(Bona fides: I sanded my house and a friends' about 10 years ago, and two rooms in my new house last year. I then went with a pro for the rest of the house — it's crappy work and not something I wanted to do again.) Drum sanders are the fastest but also take a deft hand and careful attention — they can dig a groove in the floor pretty quickly, ...


6

The make wood putty in a range of colors to match different types of wood. You can probably find one that's a close match to your baseboards. Take a small amount, fill the nail hole and wipe it smooth with a damp cloth. When it dries, lightly sand it and the surrounding area down, then re-varnish the area.


6

While a heat gun can remove a large amount of paint, there will always be some residue that needs to be removed with scrapers and sanding. Scraping can mar and gouge wood (less an issue when you can fill and paint) and sanding in tight crevasses in molding is hard. There are commercial scrapers available, but they don't always fit your needs. On important ...


6

You'll need to start over, sanding out the splotches of glue. To deal with the divots of glue, they can be 'set' using a nail-set in the same manner that you'd set a nail ... or the divots of glue can be dug/scraped out ... or simply left as-is. You'll likely have similar splotches with store bought wood filler, and blotches can arise from other ...


5

There could be a few different reasons for your situation. I would lean towards the theory that only one coat of finish, urethane or maybe varnish was applied to a poorly prepared surface. I'm afraid there is not quick fix to your problem. I would be looking at stripping and sanding the entire floor, clean away every spec of dust and refinish with at ...


5

It really depends on the floor. Some flooring is very thin layers over particle board, so sanding can easily eat through all the top layer. Other flooring is thicker. If you can, see if you can figure out the manufacturer and type. If not, the best thing to do is find a place where experiments will not be visible and try sanding. In a kitchen, one great ...


4

It seems that you can refinish it, pretty much just like any hardwood floor. However bamboo has a very low burn temperature, so you need to be careful with the sander that you don't burn it.


4

Belt-style floor sanders were current years ago, but more recently the best bet is a random-orbit style sander like the Varathane ezV sander. The random-orbit sanders don't have nearly the risk of grooving that the belt sanders do, and these ones also have a built-in vaccuum which collects a large portion of the dust, unlike the sanders of my childhood. ...


4

One option is to replace the board. You would need to: Cut out the old board. Find a board that matches the type and grain of the rest of the floor Install the new board. Stain it to match. Buy your dog a chew toy. :) UPDATE You can remove most of the old board by: Cutting it out with a circular saw. Using a hammer and chisel (or even a flathead ...


4

I just tried "Goof Off" http://www.goofoffstainremover.com/ on the underside of my table and it worked very well. Of course the underside of my table is sealed with polyurethane. You might just want to leave it. This seems strange at first, but I resigned myself to it years ago. Now when I look at the child inflicted damage around my house I think of it ...


4

No you don't buy a new brush each time, you properly clean the brush after each use and it will last you for years! Water didn't work because.... remember school... water and oil don't mix? You need to clean your brush with mineral spirits, naptha or something similar. The product will tell you what to clean up with. –


4

Oils all pretty much set up the same way. They oxidize and form a polymer cross-link. Once this has happened, you have a vegetable plastic coating on everything they came in contact with and were absorbed into. It's non-reversible so after-the-fact cleaning isn't an option. Removing the oil while it's still liquid usually requires mineral spirits, ...


4

It appears as if the finish is some type of penetrating stain and sealer. There may also be a worn topcoat, such as satin polyurethane, that has worn. SAND - As described in several comments, wood siding can be sanded to both remove scratches and even out the color. If you wish to stain the surface to restore the natural finish and even out the tone, it is ...


4

Wall to wall carpeting is usually attached to the floor using carpet tack strips around the perimeter like these The raised tack points grip the edges of the carpet. Once you pull up the carpet, there is probably a padding that is just laid on the floor without adhesive. If it is rubber backed, the rubber bottom surface sometimes sticks to the floor ...


3

I refinished the floors in my house (built in 1940's and originally hardwood floors). At some time, carpet had been put over the top in all rooms. When I purchased the house, there was carpet in one room and the previous owner had ripped up the carpets in the other rooms and only used an ugly wood stain in their pathetic attempt to "refinish". I ripped ...


3

I have had repairs done on oak floors that resulted in refinishing small areas. It looks remarkably good. The process is straightforward: sand the area, clean it with a solvent afterwards (denatured alcohol), apply polyurethane, let dry. Use solvent based polyurethane and get the same finish type (gloss, satin, etc.) and apply a few thick coats.


3

I had polyurethane on my hardwood (tasmanian oak) and baltic pine floorboards for ten odd years. It wore very well but we don't allow shoes inside. The floors did yellow quite a bit over time which didn't matter for the pine, but the oak lost its lovely pinky hue. We recently did extensions and re-polished our floors. We chose to use hard-wax this time ...


3

You have a difficult problem on your hands my friend. there is no way to remove oil based stains, including olive oil, from natural wood. Pine is actually a very soft wood and easily absorbs stains of all types. A very shallow stain can sometimes be steamed up, sanded and refinished, but a larger stain from an oil may have penetrated deeply into the wood ...


3

What you will want to do is to get a polyurethane stripper with brush, a pair of rubber gloves, a scraping tool, fine grit sandpaper (200), a clean cloth, and a well ventilated room. Start by applying the polyurethane stripper liberally and evenly over the wood using the brush. Let it stand for about 5 minutes or whatever the directions instruct you to do. ...


3

Just to build on what richardtallent said... 3/4 inch solid oak floors can handle 3 refinishes we were told. Beyond 3 and the wood is to thin. This is very very dirty work. the dust will get everywhere. When we did out first floor, we had just remodeled the kitchen. make sure you tape off any rooms you want to keep clean with heavy plastic and painters ...


3

Others have recommended actual products, but it is possible that those will leave stains on the surface after the fact. Have you considered/tried a steam cleaner? They are pretty good for tasks like that and they use only water so you have less of a mess left behind. I've used it to remove stickers from an array of surfaces and it works great every time. ...


3

Unfortunately, I'll be surprised if you can effect a very successful repair. Restoring the outer corners like those is tricky at best. And having it stained only makes it worse, since the wood grain will be easily visible. Most likely any attempt to repair will make it worse looking not better. I'd opt for something low-impact, such as a scratch-cover ...


3

Harbor Freight makes a surprisingly-decent inexpensive heat gun that will do what you want. You should test in a non-visible area before doing any major work. there's no way to know for sure until you test due to the wide variety of paints and treatments that could be on the window. Also , do you know what kind of wood is underneath and are sure it is a ...


2

Without seeing how deep the brush marks are, it is hard to advise if a simple sanding or more drastic stripping is needed. If they are fairly superficial, I'd try sanding with 150 grit paper on a DA or vibe type sander first. If it seems like it's gonna take sanding all the way to the wood to get rid of the marks, then stripping may be easier. As far as ...


2

Just did a little research: http://woodworking.about.com/od/finishing/p/polyurethane.htm I couldn't find out whether it needs to be the same as the previous application. IMHO, I don't think it needs to be the same, unless you're trying to match how it looks with other parts of the table. I would decide based on: how tolerant you are the odor of the ...


2

You could install a thin threshold between each room. That would cover the overlap in finish between the rooms. If the planks run parallel to the doors, you could cut out one board between the two rooms. That would give a clean line between finishes (and place the one board back at the end. All that said, you will save a TON in labor if you just do it all ...


2

I've used vinegar and baking soda and a little elbow grease, which works well. It didn't take the varnish off; actually it made the table brighter. Then I gave it a good polishing.



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