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1

you can use office chair casters for hardwood floors, they are made of a soft Polyurethane material and they protect the wood floors, any ways I recommend to clean them every few weeks because the dust stick to the rubber and that can produce scratches on the floor. A good brand that I use and I am very happy with is Katu casters, check them on Google.


2

Low-E windows will go a great job, and help with many energy losses. A rug will always be better than just about anything, covered places on just about anything will take less abuse than uncovered surfaces. Minwax has always been my favorite for anything I can put it on. Their naming conventions are not always the most clever. 'Minwax Super Fast-Drying ...


1

If you can locate your floor joists, you can use a longer, ~2-2.5" finish nail and nail both finish floor and subfloor to the joist. Once the subfloor is tightened down, you can spot nail the finish floor to the subfloor as needed. I did that in my 1928 house and it worked.


0

Pro: cheap, and nothing prevents you from putting a real surface on if you find the look does not really appeal after a while. Cons: Potential for nasty splinters; plywood splinters are miserable. Relatively loud (both to walk on, and acting as a reflector of sound - also loud to the level below if there is living space there).


3

All can be solved with money. Of course, at certain point it becomes cheaper to buy a brand new floor than keep fussing with an old one. Nails become more visible after you sand a floor down. You can sink the nails by using a nail punch and then fill in the hole with a putty, but the putty has to matched to the color of the wood which is non-trivial. ...


1

I have placed Dricore or its equivalent on 2 different jobs. Both are holding up fine, neither felt hollow or creaky. One was in a basement slab, the other was placed on a slab on grade such as yours. The only difference is one had 4" to 10" wide plank flooring from recovered barn wood, the other 2 1/4" strip. While the subfloor was being laid, I glued the ...


0

Ok, since you said that only floor joists are under floor, I’m guessing that they are lied down in a layer of sand? If that is the case you have more problems than bad wooden floor. Firstly, I don't suggest that you put anything over existing floor, because it is like building house on a poor foundation, every new floor will sunk down together with its ...


1

First on squeaking: Try to figure out what the cause of the squeaking is before trying to fix it. I advise you at least figure out the cause before putting in a new floor on top of the old one, as access to the old floor may be helpful. Most common cause for squeaking (as far as I know) is that the floorboards aren't fastened perfectly to the joist anymore ...


7

Talk to a hardwood installation company. You might be surprised at what they can do with your floor in your budget. It might be too expensive depending on the extent of the damage, but a lot of visual damage is actually acceptable in vintage hardwood floors, and they may be able to replace the bad pieces, resolve the squeak, and refinish the floor for a ...


2

If your ceiling height allows it I would screw down 3/4 plywood over the existing flooring (after screwing down all the creaky pieces I could find) and then put down wood flooring over that. I would skip over the self-leveling products as much as possible.


4

What you're describing sounds similar to my parents house. They had a thin layer of plywood (1/4"?) installed over the original hardwood floor to level it, and then put a new hardwood floor on top of that with the new boards laid perpendicular to the original flooring. It's been a half dozen years since the work was done, and the new floor is still ...


7

Yes you can use the existing floor as a subfloor, but I humbly submit, that the brittle cement based self leveling underlayment would not do well sandwiched between two wood surfaces, and a slew of fasteners driven through it. I seems to me the vibration, the fastener shooting through the cement would start cracking up the poured underlayment. I believe it ...


4

In addition to the prospect of using the existing flooring as a subfloor with adequate leveling, which would be suitable for basically everything besides tile, you could additionally add lay 3/4" plywood over it to make that a new subfloor, and then lay tile or any other kind of flooring you want over it.


5

can I just treat the existing floor as a subfloor and do what I like once I get it level? Got it in one. Look at gypsum cement "self leveling" floor compound for one approach. "self leveling underlayment" is another name of a product with similar applicability. If, like @Jack, you are afraid of nailing though it (not a problem with the right product, ...


5

Kudos for being such a diligent renter. The cardboard they come in is totally adequate. Depending on what you've got, you might even have a nice double layer workspace.



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