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If you can slide them in, then - sand, finish (top face only), assemble. You may need to use a bit of glue on the grooves in the new pieces to hold them in place. There still may be a visible difference between the color and finish of the old and the new. The only way to get them both exactly the same is to refinish the entire floor as suggested by @python ...


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If you ask me there is only one right way to solve this problem: place the boards in the position, then sand the entire floor and polyurethane it. This way repair will (almost) invisible.


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Wood filler can temporarily fill anything, even the annoying gaps that run parallel to the long edges of your floor boards. But the size of those gaps changes all year long and the wood filler in those gaps isn’t elastic enough to swell and shrink with the seasons and so will just get pummeled and eventually break up.


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Those gaps are never to be filled. The seasonal movement of wood will squeeze the putty back out of the gaps. Next heating cycle, the flooring will shrink again and will show the gaps again, looking something like the ragged edges your pictures show. Somebody tried filling the gaps already.... at least that one....


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Painter's putty would work, but I don't know if it'd be your best option. First of all you'd need a ton of it to fill between every piece of flooring. Also, unless your going to use it after you put the finish on your floor, I'm not sure that the stain or lacquer wouldn't dissolve the putty. Unfortunately, I don't know what would be your best option, but I ...


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I'd set a course of planks parallel to the wall on the right, tongue pointing left. Screw scrap on the left side of that course to keep it from moving. Rip a spline (tongue substitute) and start a course on the right with the tongue facing right. Nail your way toward to transitions on the right, understanding that you'll face nail the ones near the wall. Now ...


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Pick up any Dwell issue and you will see plywood floors all over the place. No real cons other than style taste but realize you still need to 'finish' the floor by proper sanding, nail/screw setting and finish. One potential con is that you can't resand and refinish plywood floors more than once or twice. The top layer is just not thick enough.



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