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-1

whoever installed it originaly didnt have a clue what they were doing. Niether do you. you NEVER glue the underlayment..it is an Acclimating product.SMH


1

I have seen flooring experts for old homes using different sizes of rope in the gaps. They actually dye or stain the rope to match the floors and then glue them into place. I have seen the results and I have to say that it looks good and adds character.


0

For light wear (just surface scratches), a "screen and recoat" approach can restore the surface and appearance -- at least for poly; not sure about other varnishes. Deeper damage probably means a full refinishing.


1

I have years of using both. I have no scientific data or anything like that. If I had big pieces of lint/whatever stuck in polyurethane then I would use a sanding screen. If I had a large area of issues I would use sandpaper. A screen will allow you to knock out things that are not flush with your surface while leaving your surface in tact - see @DA01's ...


4

Depends on the quality of the existing finish... if it's as flat as you want it to be, then I'd kiss it with 150 on a pole sander. Link for illustration purposes only: there are many out there... If you need to knock down blobs/ runs/ etc, then start with 120 on the handheld random orbit sander. Work your way up to 150/220. Vacuum and then wipe with a ...


0

You can try whatever to the board that is warped. If it works great, if it doesn't you are back to square one. Mineral oil plus dumbbell may work, but it is a factor of the amount of space that is there below the wood. I seriously doubt you are going to condense the water logged wood. So your objective would just be to have the wood flat on the surface. ...


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Re-did some floors a couple of years ago with the same situation, two layers of carpets on hardwood floor with the bottom layer glued down. We used heat gun and scrapers to remove most of it, and then some glue remover on the worst parts. After doing this the person that came in and re-did our floors said that was not needed, especially the glue remover. He ...


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Pros: I can't think of any. Cons: You will have gaps and screws showing, it will be extremely hard to clean, plywood will suck up poly faster than a fat guy drinking a milkshake, ditto the whitewash... Real not to do it are simple. You would have to sand down everything to prevent splinters. Good chance an inspector doesn't even pass it. No way I ...


1

I think the easiest way to tell, look for a quarter round trim between the cabinet and the floor. If it has a quarter round, then two options: floor does not go under the cabinet, or the owner likes the look of the quarter round. If it doesn't have a quarter round, floor goes under the cabinets, and if it doesn't it is pretty easy to see it doesn't (hence ...


4

3 choices Measure toe kick height. These are usually right at 4 or 4.5 inches. I might assume that if toe kick was 3 3/4" then there was probably no hardwoods under. This is not the best way though because toe kicks can be non-standard. Remove a piece of trim and see if you see the bottom of the cabinets. This might just be pulling back some quarter ...


4

If it is an older house with existing hardwood floors, there is a terrific chance of the floor going under the cabs, If there is laminate flooring, The chances are nil it goes under. On older homes, with hardwood floors if the cabinets are removed, they may need to be refinished anyway since the floors usually are never sanded and stained under the ...



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