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7

You'll need hollow door fixings - something like these Expanding wings grip securely in hollow doors, thin skin partitions, plywood and fibreglass. Ideal for the home, boat and caravan.


6

Looks like an L corner bracket/brace. Probably worth upgrading to a metal one if it would fit: Amazon product link


5

Definitely the Brad nails. The finish nails will leave larger holes (16 gauge vs 18 gauge usually) and will be more likely to split the wood. Based on the size of your shoe, i dont think you could use pin nails (18-23 gauge). The Big Box home improvement store always sell kits with finish, brad, and pin nailers for pretty cheap. Some have 2 guns, some 3, ...


5

There is no reason you cannot have conventional double doors on a closet. Bracing the Inside Corner To solve the free corner issue, you can put a small stop, attached to the floor at the center point between the two doors. It needs to be wide enought to stop both doors (probably anything over 1 inch would do) and tall enough to catch the doors at the ...


4

Unless you're using armored (BX, or metal-sheathed) wire, you can use either type box, your preference really. If you use BX, you need to use a metal junction box. There's a couple different types of boxes. The plastic ones with nails on them, and the metal ones with clips are designed to mount with their face 1/2" farther out than the front, which ...


4

Admittedly, I haven't done it before but I came across instructions awhile ago (courtesy of eHow and Google). Maybe they'll be helpful. http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-fix-a-broken-tub-trip-lever http://www.ehow.com/how_3391064_replace-triplever-bathtub-drain.html -M


4

Try searching for "utility pole standoff bracket" and you'll find things like this Garvin bracket. Also check if the Band-It Company has something you can use.


4

your question is "what is this thing called", and I agree that T-nut is a good answer, but when you described your application, perhaps what you're looking for could be called a "leveling foot".


4

I dont know how you would make curved channels. But anything short of installing pulleys in the posts I don't think the wires would be tight enough. With the codes 4" maximum opening the wires need to be extremely tight to prevent a child from spreading the wires apart. Plus the turnbuckle and screw eye contradicts the clean lines of the wire.


3

I have it! 4" cable pulleys (used in garage doors) You put them on the inside, (no post grooving) The 4" diameter means the spacing between strands will be perfect, the tensioning will be uniform, with no kinking. You just offset the opposite pulleys down by 4".


3

From surfing a bit, it seems Baldwin has a variety of handlesets that work with a limited number of their locksets. If you can't buy just the plate, you might only need to buy the lockset. It seems to be called a 'Landing Plate' http://www.electronicsweekly.com/made-by-monkeys/materialsmaterials-processing/view-image-youll-2009-01/ We’ve had ...


3

NRG greenboard is 98% air and therefore only 2% polystyrene NOTHING can be mounted TO this. Your reel may be mounted THROUGH it to the studs behind. From the Greenboard handbook: 17.1.5 Solid Blocking of Fitting and Accessories Consideration should be given to the installation of wall mounted accessories i.e. taps, electrical ...


3

You could get a length of 1" x 1" x 1/8" angle steel, and manufacture your own. Start by using a chop saw to cut the angle steel into pieces as wide as you need. Next cut one side of the L to 3/16". A jig will help you cut the pieces quickly and accurately. Use another jig to help you drill the holes. A drill press with a carbide-tipped or cobalt ...


3

Depending on the size of the pole, you might be able to use a chimney mount, which is straps that go around a solid object, or possibly a wall mount type if you can screw into the pole. ChannelMaster sells a variety of mounts, but you can also find some at your friendly local Radio Shack, though the 2" requirement might be a problem, I think most of the ...


2

With NM wire, I'd go new-work plastic myself, I find them easier to work with. The metal boxes must be wired to the ground wire, and they need inserts for the knock-outs to keep the NM cable from possibly being cut by the sharp edges of the knock-out holes. With plastic, neither of these is a concern. Also, remember that if you plan on finishing the ...


2

better to remove the old one, then bring it with you when you do shopping, then show to the place where is you gonna buy it, or go to the second hand renovation shop and could be they have a spare of the old bathtub. But I believe there is have somewhere. And I think they are still standard... Good luck : )


2

What I would do if it is hitting on the latch side is to remove a screw on each hinge in the middle of the hinge and replace it with a screw that is about 3½" to 4" long. Tightening these screws will pull the jamb in on the hinge side giving your door room to close on the latch side. Try it.


2

I'm not sure about ChrisF's suggestion since I've never had that particular problem (with the door rubbing on the hinge side) - is the issue that it's hitting the frame on the hinge side or the doorknob side? If it's hitting the jamb on the doorknob side (as if the door is now too wide) then the usual solution is to trim down the door. Usually I would run ...


2

How do I go about fixing this? I guess I could take them off again, and chisel away a little on the door grooves or in the frame, That's pretty much the only way - but take a good look and work out which side (door or frame) needs to move and in which direction. I've done this in the past and gone the wrong way at first which isn't good. In some cases ...


2

This is a bit out there and seemingly off track, but please bear with me. We have a premium shower system which includes a shower head holder on a vertical bar: Except our showerhead is much more substantial than in this photo and exerts fair bit of torque on the slider assembly. So much so that we barely have to tighten the slider. As a result, we tend ...


2

Just speculating, but one single cable provides a single point of failure. That fact alone probably excites lawyers enough to prevent such products from being widely produced, let alone marketed. Also, the friction at the posts will be quite high at the range of tension needed to stabilize the cable making it quite difficult to transmit the tension ...


2

Before you consider the attachment mechanisms, you need to consider the structural design. There is a problem with the current version if it is intended to be load bearing. A structure that is basically a vertical parallelogram is inherently unstable. The joints serve as pivot points and the top of the structure can effectively slide sideways and collapse. ...


2

250lb cable ties are made, yes. "industrial zip ties" seemed to be a pretty good search string for finding sources. Probably more the cold making the plastic brittle than the basic strength of the zip tie. They do make "large, industrial" zip ties (I've seen 3 feet long and half an inch wide, and they probably go bigger) but you'll probably get better cost ...


2

Looks like a brass spacer to me: Though it could be some sort of brass (or steel, as indicated by the asker) roller like you might find in something like a laser printer (if they still used metal parts in laser printers instead of plastic). I think it would be impossible to say with any certainty exactly what it's meant for without seeing where it came ...


1

Last year I built a bed frame similar to this (mine wasn't so tall, and it was only a queen sized bed), and also had the goal of making it easy to disassemble. I achieved my goal, but after moving to a new house realized it wasn't a good choice. While moving, I found it was much easier to simply remove the legs, and carry the "platform" as a single piece. ...


1

I have only seen something like that for 2x4 and for 4x4. See: Simpson Deck Post Tie DPTZ The DPTZ Deck Post Tie products are used to attach 2x4 (DPT5Z) or 4x4 (DPT7Z) vertical posts to the side of stringers, rims or other wood members. 2x4 Deck Post Tie 4x4 Deck Post Tie You could ask your "engineer" if you can make your own 2x2 tie with ...


1

Rather than use with brackets why don't you consider the use of some 3/8" x 2.5" lag bolts installed through 7/16" holes drilled through the post. If you do this remember that for best grip of the lag bolts into the surface behind will be to drill the proper sized pilot hole. In this case the pilot drill can be 1/4" size.


1

Start by attaching two rack gears to the post. Next fabricate a halved trolley. Rear Trolley Front Trolley You'll need a couple pinion gears that can mesh with the rack gears. And a couple pins to allow the gears to spin. Next assemble the trolley. You can use cotter pins through the gear pins to hold everything together You'll probably ...


1

A picture would help, but if I'm understanding correctly, many of those latches come with a metal plate: Find/make one of those, and then screw it into the floor appropriately. Eg, if it's stone, you'll have to pre-drill a hole with a concrete bit, and install it using concrete screws (eg, tapcons).


1

16" refers to the length of the slide when closed, which will usually also be the depth of the drawer you're installing them on. Your cabinet (or whatever you're installing in) would need to be at least 16" deep, plus the thickness of any false front you may have on the drawer if you want to make them flush. It's also a nominal length--I just bought these ...



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