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i am assuming that the situation you are describing is drywall on furring strips on concrete (so there is a 3/4" or so gap between the drywall and the concrete). if its drywall directly on concrete, see the first answer. if its the latter than see below. the issue is always with a railing the loading of the railing on the brackets causes crushing of the ...


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You can drill holes into the concrete with bits made for concrete. Depending on how dense the concrete is you can sometimes do this with a regular drill. (This takes some patience, it's not like drilling into wood. Don't push too hard or you'll break the bit. Just have patience) If the concrete is too dense, a hammer drill may be necessary. And yes they have ...


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No concrete hard enough with a standard Hammer Drill with a masonry bit. Just drill a hole, then use one of those cheap plastic wall anchors. With the plastic anchor in place, you now have a screw-friendly hole. Unfortunately, this is the only reliable solution.


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Use Marine grade ply, water won't affect it, it's a neat finish and will do the job. Only problem it is more expensive though that might not be the case after you finish tarting up the alternative materials.


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I was inspired by ojait's inlay answer and combined it with the TapCon recommendation. I got four pieces of 2" x 1" x 10" green-treated plywood and glued two pairs together using silicone. I placed the mount against the wall and outlined the screw hole locations, then laid each plywood inlay over four end screwhole outlines and outlined the plywood. ...


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Yes, OSB or plywood would be a suitable substructure. It will distribute the load and create a stable mounting surface for your assembly. OSB is similarly strong to plywood and can be more uniform, depending on the grade of plywood. Its drawback is its susceptibility to swelling and flaking due to repeated moisture exposure. Individual boards are less ...



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