Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

You could use a keyhole router bit to cut keyhole slots in the back to hang it. Another option would be to use a french cleat. Either buy a metal one that could attach to the back of the shelf or integrate one into the wood back. Here is a discussion of french cleat techniques.


16

Your margin of error sounds a bit low - one thing to bear in mind is that while the static force of you in the chair is half the rating of the hook, the peak force will be higher as you "drop" into the chair. If you can get a bigger hook it might be worth it. If you have a hook on a plate then you'll spread the load across more bolts thus each one won't ...


14

Ideally this should be screwed/anchored into a joist for maximum support. However, if you really want to use a drywall anchor, you should use a toggle bolt or a ceiling anchor. Instead of just screwing into the wall, these expand to several times their size which gives you a good hold, especially when the force is pulling directly down. 10lbs might be ...


11

It depends on the type of mount. If it's an articulating arm mount, the bending moment at the wall is going to be a lot higher than if you're doing a flush mount. In that case the safest option would be to open up the drywall and put 2x4s inside the metal studs, and use the included wood screws to attach the mount to the new 2x4s. If this is a load ...


11

At Home Depot (or Lowes) you should be able to find these Spring Loaded Mirror Mounting Clips made specially for hanging a mirror. They are no where near as big as a j channel and the top two have a small spring inside of them so they kind of grasp the mirror (and snugly fit on the glass). You put the two without the springs in the bottom and the mirror ...


11

I would not risk hanging a glass shelf with those strips. They are meant for hanging things directly from (like a towel, hair dryer, etc.), not a shelf that sticks out. Instead of just pulling down on the strip, it will pull down and away, almost a guaranteed recipe for broken glass. Unfortunately there is no way to anchor something to the wall without ...


11

If the shelf is thick and deep enough, you could use a "concealed floating support bracket." I purchased a few at eBay. My picture of it below. This particular concealed floating support bracket requires a 12mm diameter hole drilled into the shelf, about 100mm deep, to accept the long supporting pin. You'd also need to cut out some of the back of the ...


9

Concrete is a great building material because it has very high "compressive strength"; it resists being crushed, and so can support a very heavy load placed on top of it. However, it has very poor "tensile strength" and "shear strength"; it can be "pulled apart" relatively easily. This means that hanging stuff from underneath usually doesn't work very well, ...


9

Your local mountaineering/rock climbing/etc. store (Mountain Equipment Co-Op is the one I am familiar with) will care a Swivel device that allows for rotation while still supporting the loads seen with a swing. The model pictured is good for a working load of 5kN which is about 1124lbs and a breaking strength of 23kN. They are expensive, however.


8

I would drill a small hole through the plaster first to test your theory about how much space you have behind the plaster. Your bit will stop when it hits the chimney, and you can use that to judge how much room you have. If you have enough room, I would go with a toggle bolt style fastener. If not, then you might need to use a masonry bit and drill into ...


8

I installed big, heavy floating shelves in my house. The shelves are simple 2x10's purchased from a hardware store. They are pretty heavy and I knew there would be a lot of torque on any fastener I used. To hang them, I used 5/16ths threaded rods purchased from Home Depot. I cut them to about 7-8 inches long. Using a 1/4in drill bit, I drilled 4 holes into ...


7

Poster putty is an adhesive, but supposed to not damage posters or walls. Similar products are sold under names like Sticky Tack, Mounting Putty, and Blu-Tack.


7

Basically you need to look at two things: What you are hanging (how heavy, will it sway, is it a vertical load or does it have a horizontal component) What are you hanging it on (wallboard, plaster, old crappy plaster, stud wall, concrete wall, brick, stone, solid wood...) Then you pick the right fastener at the intersection of these two. Assuming you ...


7

Tape and concrete don't really mix that well. It might initially hold, but it will eventually let go. The best solution is to drill a hole and use a light concrete anchor or concrete nail. Alternatively, you can use a special metal band that wraps the pole and has an attachment on it (sorry, I don't know the exact name of these) - they are often use for ...


7

The screws in your picture have a tapered head that match the holes for the screws, so when they are tightened all the way, it will force the screw into the center of the hole; this is why they are OK until they are tightened. My guess is that your marks or holes are not perfectly in the center. It could also be that you are drilling at an angle. Grab a ...


7

As a variation of this answer you can use any of these cabinet shelf hangers (which can be found in your local hardware store): They are attached to the back of the shelf somewhere where the material is thick and strong enough. You have to make a cavity under the lamp-shaped hole so there's room for the screw head - the cavity can be drilled, routed or ...


6

I hang my posters gallery-style. Get a piece of glass (or plexi) cut to the exact size of the poster. Buy some nice hanging nails and use them to rest the glass on - one at each corner. The nails pictured below have a really nice edge, hold the glass well, and leave very little damage to the wall. You can pick these up at a hardware store or a framing ...


6

The thumb tacks will hold best if they go straight in to the wall without wiggling. If they move back and forth as they're going in, they'll create a larger hole from which they could more easily be pulled. If you can push the tacks all the way in without side to side movement without using a hammer, then there's no advantage to using one. If the hammer ...


6

Liquid Nails Mirror Adhesive, but it does say you need to use a mechanical support as well, such as a shelf angle or "J" channel. Another option is Heavy Duty Construction Adhesive which will hold about anything. In our new house, we installed large, frameless mirrors in each bathroom using this and it worked great. UPDATE As Alex pointed out in the ...


6

You're already putting lots of holes in your ceiling, which will have to be patched. As long as you don't mind some holes, try this: Use approximately a 1/4" drill bit to drill into a likely spot on your ceiling. If it hits wood all the way through, you've just found a joist. If it goes through the lath and hits a void, get a piece of wire or an old coat ...


6

This may be thinking outside the box, but there are other ways to display a picture rather than "hanging" them. Hopefully these inspire some solutions... Have you considered using some sort of display easel like the one above instead? Google Search: Photo Display Easel Compression poles are also an interesting way to hang things without causing ...


6

I recently had to do something very similar (using a door as a headboard, mounted to the wall). I ended up using these nifty little flush hooks. They will leave your shelf 2-3 mm away from the wall, but if you have a router, you can rout a recess to mount the hooks in the back of yourself, which will make it completely flush. They take pretty small ...


5

I don't believe the thickness of the cleat is as critical as the type of wall anchor being used. The cleat holds the cabinet in place, but it's the anchors which are really bearing the weight. I would make my decision based on the type of wall material holding the cabinet and use an anchor rated for the expected weight of the cabinet for that particular ...


5

Step 1: Go to Home Depot or Lowes and raid the paint department for paint cards that look similar to the color of your bathroom wall. Step 2: Take the cards home and hold them up to the wall one at a time. You may want to get a friend to stand outside the room or get as far away as possible and view the card from multiple angles. Turn the lights on and off, ...


5

Similar to what Steven has said, the screws have a tapered head. You aren't starting your hole directly in the center of the fixture's hole when drilling. I'd suggest taking an ink pen and wrapping tape around the tip so that it is the thickness of the hole in the hook fixture when marking your drill holes. This ensures your marks are centered in the hole. ...


4

Checking with my engineer-minded girlfriend, we've got too many questions to be able to answer this. The concrete, which is intended to support a dead load, may not be able to support the moment loads that you're planning to put on it. Without having a structural diagram for the entire building and detail on what the beams are intended to do (such as -- are ...


4

The only way I can think of is to use a frame ;) You don't need to frame each poster, but create something like the advertising hoardings you see on bus stops (in the UK at least) where the frame can open and a new poster inserted. So what you'll need to do is get a piece of glass or Perspex slightly larger than the poster you want to hang. Then create a ...


4

I'd recommend a concrete epoxy for this application. It's expensive at $19 but is stronger than a mechanical anchor, and you can sink a standard eye bolt in there for a nice clean look. I'd recommend a heavy 1/2" one like this -- that one is 6" long, but if the ceiling is thick enough you could bury most of it in your hole so just the eye is exposed.


4

Do you have attic access above the spot on the ceiling? I would try to toenail a cross piece perpendicular to the ceiling joists where you want to hang your plant. If there isn't room to swing a hammer between the joists and rafters that close to the edge of the roof, you could just screw into the end of the cross piece through the joists with 3" wood ...


4

I can't find any sort of moldable "adhesive putty" that isn't in the same basic class of product as poster tack. Products like rubber cement, which are generally removable from most surfaces without damage (not much anyway), stay pliable but not moldable after they cure, and almost anything else stronger than that should be considered permanent, as it will ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible