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14

If you're using halogen bulbs, you need to handle them correctly: don't touch them directly -- hold them in a clean cloth. The reason is that halogens get much hotter than other bulbs. Oils from your fingerprints cause the bulbs to heat unevenly where you touch them, leading to thermal stresses which can crack the bulb.


8

AFAIK, bulbs with a GU-10 base are driven directly from electrical mains, in which case it's OK to use a lower-power bulb. Your fixture won't reach the temperatures that it's capable of withstanding. The only place that I know of that it might not be OK is with low-voltage (usually 12V or 24V) lighting systems such as track or task lighting: some ...


6

Some ideas to consider.............................


4

This is a bad idea. The maximum power rating for low voltage lights is lower than that for normal lights because no transformer is 100% efficient, so some allowance is made for that inefficiency in the specifications. In your case, those four lights draw 200 W plus whatever overhead the transformers add, so you're drawing more current than the switch is ...


3

Bulb changer head with pole and maybe small ladder...


3

Most of the major lighting manufacturers are starting to produce LED spots and floods for can lighting - the only downside is they're not cheap. I've been seeing them at various home improvement centers for 60-100 dollars a bulb depending on the type and wattage. Sylvania LED flood @ Home Depot


2

These bulbs can fail from overheating. If there is insulation in the space around them you may need to remove some to give them some ventiation, and it may even help to cut a small hole in the attic flooring.


2

Bottom line: switch to LED GU10 bulbs. While there might be something wrong in the electrical wiring (I am no expert there), I would address the other option, which is that these halogen bulbs have a short life period since they are getting over-heated. My suggestion would be simple: stop wasting money on inefficient halogen and switch to LED. For example: ...


2

Key difference: Halogen lights generally run from AC so this is what your transformer outputs. LED's require DC so generally yes, you will need a rectified output from your transformer. I am guessing the transformer is providing enough forward voltage on initial switch-on, but not thereafter. You may be able to add a rectifier circuit at each bulb ...


1

You probably need to replace the power supply with one designed for LEDs. According to various web sites: You aren't putting DC-only LEDs in an AC system, right? Some LEDs have compatibility issues with transformers designed for halogens. In particular, the power supply may have a minimum load and your all-LED setup uses too few watts: "When replacing with ...


1

Thanks to Tester101's comment on my question I learned about ceramic high temperature wire nuts. I ended up using these: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0071NCSA4, for 18-14 gauge wire (the ones noted in my comment above were too large, they are for 12-10 gauge wire and didn't hold on to the wires properly). I read somewhere that halogen lights reach temperatures ...


1

Colour rendering index (CRI) is on a scale 0-100. A halogen bulb will have a CRI of 100. LED bulbs generally have a CRI lower than this as this is an area manufacturers can reduce costs. Generally a CRI of 75-80 or more will be fine in the home, however anything less than this and the colour of objects may start to appear strange. Philips have recently ...


1

You're not missing anything. LEDs that have a high CRI is a relatively new market segment, so the selection is limited, and prices are high. LEDs use the same tricks as fluorescents to reach reasonable CRI levels-- multiple phosphors with different spectra excited by the lamp's primary EM emission. So the potential exists to equal or exceed the best ...


1

A quick check on Wikipedia suggests that below 5000K the Color rendering index is unreliable in the first place. Incandescent lamps have a color temperature of between 2700-3300K and a CRI of 100.


1

I went the 12V halogen route in my house when I installed recessed lights and so far I have been really happy with the color and light quality. I do notice a difference compared to most line voltage halogen lights. Ultimately though, "better light quality" is subjective and you'll find people who like both. What I did find however is that there is a larger ...


1

The first linked site appears to concern itself wholly with halogen bulbs. It claims of low-voltage halogen bulbs that, "They also produce a nicer light, with warmer, brighter and more vibrant colors." The second site's entire argument for low-voltage light being better seems to rest entirely on how configurable and remote-controllable low-voltage lights ...


1

Unfortunately, my lack of Dutch comprehension prevents me from giving a definitive statement on your situation (do you have an English translation for those switches?). That said, I live in England and all of the halogens (with their transformers) in my flat are on dimmer switches, so it is absolutely possible to have dimmer switches on your lights. ...


1

You can buy 250W Medium Base PAR38 bulbs at 1000bulbs. You should be able to find the adapter relatively easily online if you still want to go that route.


1

There are LED or other low wattage versions of a lot of light fitting available. What you need to do is take out the current bulb to check its size, type and rating and then either go down to your local hardware store or search online for the LED/energy saving equivalent. However, as @Joe points out, you need to be careful as LEDs radiate the heat ...



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