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Here's what I ended up doing, which was parts of both answers I received. Home Depot only had 22ga galvanized steel, which is thicker than I needed and was definitely tougher to work with than it needed to be. At least it's sturdy. I got a small sheet. I dug out what I could from above and then pulled the elbows off the bottom of the rusted end. Probably a ...


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You want to get a cut off the rust and find a cup that is bigger than the current part and reduces down to your gutter size - or find a couple pieces that will do the trick working together. You always wants malfunctioning piece to be encapsulated. From there you need to add a screen to the top of your downspout in your gutter so that debris does not get ...


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Personally, I'd cut the downspout back so it is even (level with the ground), with about an inch of pipe hanging down (or as much as can be saved). Get another piece of pipe, in which the inside diameter is the same as the outside diameter of the original downspout. This will be used to replace the piece you just cut off. Before you affix your new pipe to ...


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It depends on your gutter brand's seam overlap. A narrow riveting area should prompt a small rivet (1/8") because you do not want to drill a large hole (for a thicker rivet) which could weaken the gutter material in the riveted area, causing failure of the gutter material under stress. The grip range required is determined by combined material thickness.



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