New answers tagged

0

No you can't do that. Even in Arizona. Wood has a high expansion and contraction ratio, they would work themselves out of the mortar in under three years in the driest of climates. Your best option would be to membrane underneath the boards, secure them with concrete nails, and epoxy, or caulk the joints. That might last a year. In terms of code, in the ...


0

To directly answer your question, I agree with Iggy, caulk first, then seal. My long response is going to be different however: Steps: 1) Clean excess caulk 2) Clean edges to be caulked with acetone (or if you have natural stone, methyl hydrate, or even weaker, alcohol if you have sensitive materials) 3) Allow a few moments for the cleaner to evaporate (...


0

Unfortunately, no. If you read the Wikipedia article on color balance you'll learn that it is actually quite difficult to maintain true color when capturing and displaying digital media. For instance, the article has a pair of renderings of the same image of a lily: The left image is as-shot by a digital camera; the right image is adjusted so that a gray ...


0

You don't mention what type of tile you used in this situation. If it is stone or unglazed tile, consider treating the tile with either tile sealer or grout release before grouting. This will make it much easier to remove the remnants of the grout from the surface of the tile.


0

Mix all your grout together while its dry and mix thoroughly. This way all the grout will be the same color, then you can add your water and the correct amount of grout needed. Simply grout the entire floor and allow to dry 20 minutes and then start your sponge and wiping processes. I would highly suggest applying a solvent clear sealer over the grout.


-2

remove about 1/8".. should be fine



Top 50 recent answers are included