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Separate the neutral and grounding bars in the second panel. Connect the neutral feeder to the neutral bar Connect the grounding feeder to the grounding bar. Connect one end of the grounding electrode conductor to the grounding electrode (ground rod). Connect the other end of the grounding electrode conductor to the grounding bar in the panel. Connect ...


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According to code the sub needs to have the ground and neutral isolated to prevent objectionable current on the ground.


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Bonding to a metallic water pipe system is pretty common for satellite and telephone systems. While this may not be the best choice for termination, if the grounding system is correctly installed, it will work just fine. The NEC (and Article 250 applies to all grounding systems, while 800 only has additional requirements) requires an electrical bond to the ...


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"Just to clarify- the wire IS in conduit outside, but for the 6" or so it runs inside the walls, it is just bare wire." Bare naked ground conductor is perfect fine in certain space. The reason the CODE requires the ground conductor to be inside the conduit is for protecting the conductor from being damaged by any mechanical means e.g., gardener weed ...


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Well, it's not prohibited to drop another ground rod. It's a good idea. Can't hurt, might help. The ground rod would be required if it's a building. This is wobbly if it's an RV outlet, but some jurisdictions seem to require it, and most consider it the right thing to do. The whole idea of trying to get electrical ground from a rod is, after all, ...


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Safety - In what scenarios does an EGC provide protection (from electric shock, fires, etc.) where a GFCI does not? GFCIs are a poor substitute for grounding. In the absense of grounding a GFCI will only disconnect a fault to the case after your electric shock starts. Hopefully it will do it before the shock kills you but there are no gaurantees. ...


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Your GFCI will let you know about its displeasure, don't you worry. Some surge suppressors do indeed transmit some energy to the EGC -- however, this is not a major concern for typical units as MOVs absorb energy in addition to shunting it. A/V (or other) equipment in metal chassis is not a concern as well -- it is the local equipotential bonding of the ...


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GFCIs are a poor substiture for grounding. Proper grounding should disconnect a fault to the case pretty much immediately. If the case is not grounded A GFCI will only disconnect a fault to the case after your electric shock starts (but hoepfully before the sockhas persisted long enough to kill you) It's better to have a missing ground and a GFCI than to ...


3

If you're talking about the equipment grounding conductor, and not the grounded (neutral) conductor, then they may not have to "share" the same equipment grounding conductor. This answer contains all the code references, if you want to give it a read. If your area has adopted the 2014 version of the National Electrical Code, you can share an equipment ...


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Is it safe? Assuming your ground isn't faulty, yes. But there's no need. In order to meet code, an appliance with an ungrounded metal frame needs to be double insulated: that is, it needs to be designed in a way that it takes two failures for the exposed metal to become electrically live. For example, in your lamp this could take the form of insulated ...


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I'm fine with the idea of a main panel with only 2 things in it feeding a sub-panel with everything in it. Question #1 - I'd rethink putting a service panel outdoors at all. Weather is rough on panels, even if they claim to be outdoor rated. I'm a little nervous about a 100A breaker supplied from the normal bus bars, but if the manufacturer stands behind ...


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Ungrounded systems have existed for 100 years and still do in the USA and Europe. The National Electrical Code in the USA still allows many systems to remain ungrounded including older systems installed before grounded systems in dwelling units became the norm. Many areas in a home have no exposed metal piping systems or water and therefore no way to get ...


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It is a question of risk level. People in the USA have lived with ungrounded circuits for decades. With care and proper maintenance you might reasonably expect to live with them without incident. In other parts of the world, grounded circuits have been the rule for more than half a century. There is a reason that grounded circuits are now required. That ...


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It's not necessary if you are dealing with the common 24v thermostats. Those run on low voltage AC which does not present the same hazard (and thus reason for grounding) as line voltage. Generally when there's an air handler, you're dealing with 24v controls.



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