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4

My solution for this sort of thing: I built a "power strip" box containing a GFCI. That provides protection as good as or better than a safety ground, in a portable form. (If you do this often I'd suggest actually permanently replacing that outlet with a GFCI. My outdoor outlets are powered via a gfci in the basement.)


0

In this particular case, the black wire WAS NOT getting triggered by the switch. For the fixtures in question, the red wire needed to connect to the Black fixture wire, while the black wires were the "extra hot leg" that needed to be capped off separately.


4

Yes, you wired it wrong. :) The red wire is another hot leg. This is a common installation when the electrician is providing wires for a ceiling fan with lights (to be independently switched). The red wire shares a common neutral with the black wire, hence the three white wires. You should keep the white wires connected. Disconnect the red wire and cap ...


-3

In many cases in older houses the outlet box is not grounded due to code at the time. If grounded the ground was usually metal mesh around the wire screwed to the box and the neutral bar. The ground then was usually a wire that was then ran from the neutral bar to a pipe near by and clamped to it. The simple way to find out is to use a volt meter and put the ...


1

A Ground is just that a Ground and should always be used. However, please be more specific: is there just one plug with the stacked units or separate individual plugs for each? Typically a 30 amp 220 volt double pole breaker needs to be installed, 30 amp plug and receptacle. Also, check the manufacturer's wiring diagram.


0

so I'm not sure if im too late for your answer, but an EMT connecter and Flex don't go together. You want to use a BX connecter to bond that flex on both sides and you need a red plug bushing on each side to protect the cables from being pinched. you can also use a few wraps of electrical tape around the conductors (push under the flex) if you cant find the ...


0

Many multi speed ceiling fan motors will have a ground wire inside of the housing that simply attaches to a sheet metal screw on an internal part of the housing. Because this is fairly common, when adding remote circuits or dimmable lighting that also has a ground lead, most often the instructions will say to connect the ground lead to the housing also. I ...


1

NO! You cannot, for any reason, connect a grounding conductor to a neutral (grounded) conductor anywhere other than in the service equipment. If you do so, the metal box and any metal connected to the box (including the fan housing) will become a current carrying conductor. This is very bad, and can result in personal injury and/or death. I doubt the ...


0

Just use a surge protector and ignore the open ground light -- the line-to-line protection will still work. Also, where the heck did you actually connect the ground terminals to?!



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