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1

There's a many different ways to do it, and how it's done depends on personal preference. Example Methods Long tail In this variation, the Electrician will leave one of the grounding conductors long. He'll install a ground screw in the threaded hole in the back of the box, and loop the long conductor around the screw around the middle of the conductor. ...


3

Hot1 and Neutral1 are the feed from the panel. Hot2 and Neutral2 feed the next receptacle in the chain. If you connect Hot1 and Neutral1 to the receptacle, this receptacle will work. If you also connect Hot2 and Neutral2 to the receptacle, all the devices downstream will also work. Depending on the new receptacle you're installing, you should wire it ...


0

Your tester shows you 120V from Hot1 to Hot2? What country are you in? Are you sure you're not reading 240V (more or less) between Hot1 and Hot2? If you do not have an independent (typically bare copper) ground wire in the box, and the ground terminals on your receptacles are just pig-tailed to the neutrals, then you should either disconnect the pigtail ...


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The reason that wiring devices have grounding connections that accept only one wire is that otherwise, if two ground wires were connected to the device, then if someone later removed that wiring device and then re-applied power without wire-nutting the grounding conductors, there would be a break in the ground path for the downstream wiring but perhaps not ...


1

The grounding electrode can be connected at the service drop. It's kind of unconventional, but it is fine. Here is an excellent graphic from Mike Holt. Keep in mind, most areas now disallow connection inside a meter can. ©Mike Holt


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It's not immediately dangerous, but it is bad simply because it is wrong. And it may be easy to fix, as others have noted. If so, you've probably already fixed it. If not, (perhaps the prong is deeply inserted in the outlet), then consider: Turn off the power at the circuit breaker Verify the power is off using a lamp in the other outlet socket Remove ...


3

It could be bad if other things go wrong as well, or if the circuit/device is miswired. It also prevents you from plugging in other grounded devices, which could be a problem as well. The best thing to do would be to either remove it, or replace the receptacle. Turn off the power to the circuit at the breaker, and verify power is off. Then using needle ...


1

Assuming the outlet is correctly grounded, this would be no different from touching the outlet mounting screws - harmless. However, if the outlet were miswired, for example, the outlet ground actually connected to neutral (because there was no ground in the box) and there was a wiring fault disconnecting the circuit's neutral, the neutral prong, as well as ...



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