New answers tagged

-2

yeah ,don't worry about it . you're way *overthinking it . lighting fixtures at normal heigth won't normally be handled while standing on the ground. been working for years like that without incident fire or electrocution, right ?


2

Tester101 nailed the question, so I'll cover another option. Depending on your situation, it is often possible to retrofit ground. Normally, wires in a circuit must be kept together for good reason. Ground is a special case, it can be routed separately from the other wires in a retrofit situation. That is because ground is not used to flow current ...


4

They are not grounded, though may be GFCI protected. If they are wired off the load side of the GFCI, then they are GFCI protected. In which case they should be labeled with stickers that say "GFCI PROTECTED", and "NO EQUIPMENT GROUND ".


2

No, they are not grounded. Yes, they are GFCI protected (as long as they are on the LOAD side of the GFCI). You are allowed to protect older ungrounded outlets by GFCI protecting them, though it's still preferable (but more invasive) to actually get ground wires everywhere. If you have any 3-prong outlets without a ground, they must be GFCI protected and ...


1

Most lamps have a two-prong plug. All the lamps in my house, even the ones with metal casings, have two-prong plugs. I don't think you have a safety problem. However -- if I were building this lamp, I would attach a three-prong grounding plug and cord, just because the aesthetic of the lamp is so obviously 'heavy industry' and most heavy industrial ...


0

It is hard to tell from the photos they give -- but most metal lamps in the USA are of similar (Class 0) construction from an electrical-safety standpoint, so it's not more dangerous than a COTS metal lamp. If you wanted to make it safer -- run spaghetti tubing over the lamp cord running through the lamp body, and use a few wraps of insulating Mylar or ...


2

Pictured is not a legal splice. Legal crimps are expensive mainly due to the cost of the crimp tool - if you can find someone to loan you a tool, that might make all the difference in the world, but I wouldn't get my hopes up. And the other permitted methods are rather difficult to pull off (for us mortals). In practical terms, most people I know simply ...


-2

The easiest thing to do is to go to Home Depot and buy a grounding rod. They're about 6 foot long or so. Buy the grounding rod nut: it's an oval shaped brass nut with a bolt or screw in it. Then drive the grounding rod into the ground very close to the grounding wire with 3 inches of rod protruding from the ground, and then use the grounding rod nut and ...


6

Here is what the National Electrical Code says: 250.64 Grounding Electrode Conductor Installation. Grounding electrode conductors at the service, at each building or structure where supplied by a feeder(s) or branch circuit(s), or at a separately derived system shall be installed as specified in 250.64(A) through (F). (C) Continuous. Except as ...


4

Replace the outlets with GFCIs -- the operation of a GFCI in no way depends on the presence of the equipment grounding wire. You'll have to use the "No Equipment Ground" sticker that comes with them, by the way. P.S. on the metal boxes -- since it sounds like your house is a mix of K&T and other wiring techniques (perhaps NM additions), you cannot ...


-2

if you have knob and tube anything, it all has to come out and be replaced with modern 2 conductor and ground wiring. this can be done at lot more inexpensively than most people think, but you need to know what you are doing, and judging by your own comments, its probably time to get a licensed electrician.


1

I'm gonna go out on a limb and say in a typical setting there is no difference. The 25 ohm thing is meaningless, especially considering that the NEC seems to agree in that if the 25 ohm requirement is not met you can simply sink another rod and not worry one bit about the resistance. So why bother with the 25 ohm requirement in the first place. Ground rod ...


2

Well it is the National Electrical Code that requires 25 Ohms or less. Notice the exception after #5. Here: 250.53(A)(2) Supplemental Electrode Required. A single rod, pipe, or plate electrode shall be supplemented by an additional electrode of a type specified in 250.52(A)(2) through (A)(8). The supplemental electrode shall be permitted to be bonded to ...


0

It's not going to trip, because the contact resistance between the rod and the ground is too high, therefore the current will be low (Ohm's law). Despite what people may think, electricity is trying to find a way back to the source, not to the ground (earth). When you connect the ungrounded hot conductor to the earth, electricity has to flow through the ...


2

why wont the breaker trip. Firstly, remember that a 20A breaker won't be OK at 19.9999 Amps and suddenly trip at 20.0001 Amps. A 20A breaker might pass 30A┬╣ for several minutes┬╣ (or more). It is mainly designed to protect wiring in the walls that slowly heats up due to overcurrent. Secondly, soil/dirt is not a great conductor, especially when dry. It ...


1

Because dirt isn't necessarily a good conductor of electricity. If it was, power lines wouldn't have 3 wires, they'd have only 2 and they'd use the earth for the third wire. Needless to say, this has been tried and doesn't work very well. If your panel is grounded to ground rod #1, and you tie 120V to ground rod #2, all you've done is put a hazardous ...



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