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2

Way back when it was allowed to run grounding conductors to any cold water pipe for equipment grounds for circuits. This allowance was removed from the code a LONG time ago due to the practice being potentially very unsafe. When your water pipe was metallic going out into the yard it was being used as a grounding electrode and should have been bonded to the ...


2

The grounding is accomplished through the metal pipe, not through the water. Pure water is an effective electrical insulator. It's only conductive when there are dissolved salts in it (not just NaCl, but any metal salts creating free ions floating around in the water). In that case, water can become a very good conductor. But it isn't really the water doing ...


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In a "common ground" dual transformer system the commons (or "ground") for the heating and cooling transformers must be connected to each other and supplied to the thermostat through a single connection at the "C" terminal. In this arrangement, it is very important to keep the Rc and Rh (power from the cooling and heating transformers) separated and the ...


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I am a real electrician and on most of the older homes a jumper from nutruls went to ground. I been playing out here with you guys. Now i will answer your last question if you run under ground plastic pvc you dont want to use a ground rod. The way your main house panel is you can come back off the subpanel nutrals with a extra wire to all your grounds in ...


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In a 200amp main service most boxes have a jumper from neutral bar to ground. A wire makes a dead short. So everthing becomes one. If you put the ground wire on bus bar as close as you can it still seeing neutral so in english to a garage or a shed you run four wires to hots two nuturals. That balances out the load on two one ten lines equal current transfer ...


4

My solution for this sort of thing: I built a "power strip" box containing a GFCI. That provides protection as good as or better than a safety ground, in a portable form. (If you do this often I'd suggest actually permanently replacing that outlet with a GFCI. My outdoor outlets are powered via a gfci in the basement.)


0

The combination of a "bootleg ground" and reverse outlet polarity can cause this, as well as a hot-to-floating-"ground" short. The two can be distinguished using a non-contact detector and an outlet tester. The outlet tester will show a hot-to-floating-"ground" short with a normal neutral as an open ground wire (as there will be no potential across that ...


0

I just had a similar issue. Chances are a wire in the outlet is shorting another wire. You probably can't see it in that outlet because the short is from another outlet. Ie. Where the outlet is fed from. With a multimeter check the outlet and you will likely get strange voltages or as you said full line voltage on the ground. Check the voltage on the steel ...


0

In this particular case, the black wire WAS NOT getting triggered by the switch. For the fixtures in question, the red wire needed to connect to the Black fixture wire, while the black wires were the "extra hot leg" that needed to be capped off separately.



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