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2

Another solution is a lay-in grounding lug. It allows you to bond up to 4AWG wire to the junction box without splicing or pigtailing the ground wire. You can fasten it to the JB with the existing grounding bonding screw in the box. From http://www.solar-electric.com/gbdbtsopagrl.html


4

Up until 2011 the National Electrical Code allowed a "3 wire" method of connecting a sub-panel. This means you have the two "hot" wires and a neutral running to the sub-panel as opposed to the "4 wire" method where you add a separate equipment ground wire. So, when your house was built, it was perfectly legal to use the 3 wire method. There is no problem ...


3

You didn't say what you're doing with the other side. It depends an awful lot on that. If the circuit breaker in the main panel is 20 amps or less, and the existing load is 120V (i.e. between hot and neutral), you can make it a multi-wire branch circuit which is basically what you're talking about. (By "multi-wire" they mean multi-hot.) Why 120V only? ...


1

The 4th conductor is not "extra" (unless you actually have 4 + ground.) Line1, Line2, Neutral (grounded), Ground (grounding). Ground and Neutral isolated from each other, since this is a sub-panel type feed (whether or not you have a sub-panel installed - a sub-panel is the easy way to get what you want, though.) Ground connected to a ground rod (or two) ...


1

You cannot simply tap the neutral to put an outlet in -- however, since you have 4 wires running there, you can install a subpanel at the shed and feed the outlet from a 120V circuit on the subpanel. (You will have to drive a ground rod there and tie it to the subpanel ground, and of course make sure that the ground and neutral busses are separated.)


0

I came across this website which is fantastic. It has both 2 and 3 conductor wire, with some optional style choices as well. http://vintagewireandsupply.com/by-the-roll-1/ Exactly what I'm looking for


2

You should be able to purchase a three wire cord with a molded three prong grounding plug on one end open wire ends on the opposite end. These are often sold as electrical appliance replacement cords and should be available at most good hardware stores and big box type outlets. Here is an example of one type of these cords: Make sure to use proper ...


1

If the fixture is metal it should have a solid connection to the ground wire. There is usually a green screw in the fixture to secure the ground wire to. A photo may help us to pinpoint the best location to secure the ground.


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Generally, adding a ground wire is always better for electronic equipment. It helps surge suppressors do their job by providing a ground reference. It provides real chassis grounding which among other things gives a solid route for static electricity to go to ground instead of getting inside equipment. It also provides a fault path if any hot wires ...



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