New answers tagged

1

Neutral and ground should be bonded only in your main service panel. Sounds like, in your case, that's the one attached to your meter. Secondary panels should have separate neutral and ground bus bars. Bonding ground and neutral elsewhere in your home will not appear to affect functionality, but is a safety hazard. The reason it's a safety hazard is that ...


2

If the second panel is fed by the first (power is fed to the second panel through a breaker in the first), and the service neutral is bonded at the first panel. Then the ground and neutral should be separate in the second panel, and separate grounding and neutral conductors should be run between the two panels.


2

If the box is grounded, look around for a hole in the box that's tapped for a 10-32 screw. It may be on a little "hill" and already have a screw in it. Attaching a solid-core wire to this, or a wire with a spade or ring terminal, is the right way to "grab" ground off the box. I like ring terminals, they're a little harder to work with, but you can put ...


3

The rod must be at least 8 feet in the ground, and should be below or flush with the ground level. If the electrode is above the ground, it has to be protected from physical damage. So if the rod is 8 feet in the ground, you'll simply have to protect the aboveground portion from physical damage. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 2 Wiring and ...


0

From the looks of your updated photo, your house was wired with a 50s/60s type of NM that carried an undersized (16AWG) "ground"-but-not-really-a-ground with it. The common practice with these wires was to fold them back into or screw them to the cableclamps instead of bringing them into the box and pigtailing them to a ground screw on the box. In this ...


1

You appear to have older 14-2 without ground coming in from 4 directions, and each of those (or at least three of them) has a separate uninsulated ground alongside. If you combine them and pigtail to the box and your fixture, in theory everything will be protected.


1

Agree with Kris in the earlier post. Look at one of the main wires coming through the conduit in the upper left. It looks like there's a very clearly-cut ground wire that was cut close to the entrance into the box.


2

Here's my best guess at the wiring based on the photo. Looks like you've got one hot/neutral coming into the box from the panel (or another switch/outlet), and you've got 2 hot/neutrals going out of the box to other switches/outlets. Since these are all joined together, it doesn't really matter which one is coming in and which two are going out. Then it ...


3

Yes: call Dig-Safe , assuming you're in the USA. The number is 811 , at least in the states I checked very briefly. That will take care of gas & electric and I believe water lines. Tracing the sewer line, if not covered by Dig-Safe, should be pretty easy as it's almost always a straight run from wherever the pipe leaves your house to the street.


2

There is a type of device (receptacle, switch, ...) that is called "self-grounding" that is used in these applications -- there is a spring clip on each end that is pressed firmly against the box wall by the mounting screw at that end. It appears that your receptacle lacks that -- which means either a bare ground pigtail from the green screw to a 10-32 ...


6

Have confidence in that. Metallic conduit is a higher standard, used in most commercial installations. Ground is the conduit itself - you don't see many green or bare wires in conduit work. However - the outlet screws as the only ground path is not OK. Pigtail a ground wire from the junction box. Most boxes have have one hole tapped 10-32, for a ground ...


2

Metallic conduit can act as a ground path to the box, and the outlet is then grounded because it is in contact with the box(and held in firm contact by its mounting bolts). Traditional, conforms to code. I'm personally not as happy with it as I would be with a real ground wire and have tended to install GFCI outlets in these locations when I notice them on ...


2

The white wires from a GFCI or surge protector need to go to a neutral bus that is isolated from the ground bus in a sub-panel. You don't currently have that in the two-pole breaker enclosure that you have now. DON'T attach a GFCI neutral (white wire) to the ground bus. This is a violation of the code and can be dangerous as it puts neutral current on the ...


1

You cannot connect a sub-panel with only 3 wires unless it is 240 volt only (no neutral). By code, neutral and ground must only be bonded at the main panel (or main disconnect if separate). You cannot have them bonded at the sub.


2

You can change out the old breaker feeding the pump. This would be the safest way. A surge protector should be located close to your service this would then protect everything not just the pool. I voted up because it is easy to swap an old non GFCI for a GFCI protected breaker and this will make the current pool service much safer.


-1

Q1: I would look at American bonding rules, in terms of what is legal as a ground rod. Q2: I recommend pigtailing your grounds. That is, one wire comes from the panel, a second wire travels to the next outlet, and a third short wire goes to this outlet. All three wires are spliced together using whatever method is legal. The reason to "pigtail" is ...


0

To your Q1: I would check which power grid is used in your country, normally (at my place) it is TN-C network. The earth (grounding) has the purpose that in any case of a leak current to ground the circuit breaker has to switch off. For that a connection outside your internal network is needed (grounding). When the pipes are isolated to earth I do not ...



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