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A ground wire needs to be connected to the ground bar in the breaker panel where the branch circuit originates. If you have only hot&neutral leaving the breaker panel, and then further on the circuit someone used Romex with ground to extend a circuit, you will need to run additional wire to ensure that the receptacle is truly grounded and not just wired ...


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As long as the wire is sound and is joined old and new properly, i.e., not just twisted together but secured with a twist lock or crimp connector it meets code and is fine. Consider that the hot and neutral is already joined there so the ground connection does not degrade that circuit and is quite proper. That said - anytime you can replace old wiring with ...


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Yes you can, but the proper thing to do would be to run a whole new cable from the panel to that first box. If you can do it with a ground wire it is not much harder or more expensive to do it right with a new cable.


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grounding in a home IS exposed. Consider every metal water line, gas line - in older homes those were used as the grounding mechanism. The ground is connected to the metal body of appliances, tools etc. In case of short in the system the current will pass through the body of the appliance through the ground wire to the panel and then to the dedicated ground ...


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Residential Dishwashers are connected with a cord. The ground wire is the most important wire because it is intended to keep people safe from shock hazards. Unlike the NM cables (romex) that runs throughout your home cords come with an insulated ground. Some dishwashers have a ground wire and some have a grounding screw that the green wire of the cord needs ...


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The circuit is finding a path back to source. At some point along the circuit there is a connection to another neutral, or someone connected the ground and neutral and the current is returning through the metal pipes. The only way to find whats causing it is to start opening each outlet, light, and junction box until you find the shared neutral, or neutral ...


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Usually you don't ground light fixtures that have nothing on them that is conductive that you can touch; example would be those plastic or ceramic rosebud fixtures (side note, I have no idea why I call them that). Most of the time they don't even have a ground terminal, so it's not even an option. I'd like to see the wiring but sight unseen my guesses are: ...


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That wiring is AC cable, modern AC cable. I can clearly see the bonding strip that makes the sheathing a grounding conductor. So since a grounding means exists you must use it. With switches, simply screwing them to a grounded metallic box grounds them, as opposed to a receptacle which would need to be a self-grounding type. So technically, just installing ...


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NEC says that you can replace a switch where no grounding conductor exists, though you'll have to use a nonconducting, noncombustible faceplate. For clarity, I'd leave the grounding conductor from the switch disconnected. That way if anybody comes along in the future, they won't be confused and think the enclosure is grounded. National Electrical Code ...


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The only reason not to connect the ground wire would be because there is nowhere to connect it. Older houses have 14/2 without a ground, particularly to ceiling boxes. The box itself may not be grounded. In this case, it would be better NOT to connect it to the box, as a signal to the next person working in there, "Warning! This is not grounded!" ...



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