New answers tagged

6

First off, why is the ground #6? Seems big unless the circuit is over 60A. Personally, as Tester commented, I'd use a double lug screwed to the box via a machine thread screw, that is if you can find one small enough. The one Tester linked is quite large for the application. Smaller ones might be hard to find though. This one is the smallest I could find: ...


-2

You're familiar with the crimp-on red/yellow/blue ring terminals commonly used in hobby or automotive wiring? That system extends into larger sizes (#6 wires use a blue sleeve) and they also make code-rated lugs for electrical work (that don't have insulating sleeves). They are made in every reasonable size including 6ga. to #10 screw. They don't make ...


-2

the receptacle has steel tabs on it which bond to the box when you fasten it. this should qualify as bonding. I am not a licensed electrician though so you might talk to one.


2

No. While ground may be tied to the earth, it's also connected back to the source (distribution transformer). Electricity doesn't flow from the transformer to the earth, it flows from the transformer back to the transformer. Only connecting the grounding conductor to the earth, will not provide an effective ground-fault path. So a ground-fault will not ...


4

According to Table 250.122 of the National Electrical Code, a 10 AWG copper conductor is fine as an equipment grounding conductor for circuits with up to 60 ampere protection. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection Article 250 Grounding and Bonding 250.122 Size of Equipment Grounding Conductors. (A) General. ...


-1

Before you ground large metal structures on your roof to Earth, consider not just code, but consider why lightning happens. Electrical potential develops between the sky and the ground, and it will find the easiest path it can to discharge, even if that means breaking down hundreds of feet of air into plasma! If you are putting a large surface area on your ...


2

There's a few options. No grounding conductor If there's no grounding conductor at all, there's a few things you can do. Install a grounding conductor Obviously, you could install a grounding conductor for the circuit. Share a grounding conductor Code allows you to share a grounding conductor from another circuit, as long as the grounding conductor is ...


2

Install a ground lug in the panel, something like this one, or use a kit like this one. Just remember, like you said, that the neutral bar has to be isolated from the panel. It'll be on plastic/insulating stand-offs.


1

Bath Fan above shower (or tub)-- per code, must be "rated" for use in wet area/above shower (will be listed on the packaging/instructions of the Fan/light). All such fans I'm familiar with also require GFI protection. So answer is to put fan either on "load" side of existing bath GFI protection (assuming no other bathroom GFIs connected to that circuit) or ...


2

I have faced a similar problem with the MS-OPS2. After talking to technical support and ruling out the "open ground" condition by running a jumper with to earth ground to the MS-OPS2's ground wire. Lutron technical support told me to get a different product offering (MS-OPS6M2N-DV-6) I said to myself "bullsh*t" it is just a switch. It works or it is bad. ...



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