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12

I have done this with granite tiles in two different sizes, 12 by 12 inches (30x30cm) and 18 by 26 inches (45x65cm). Not a full slab, but it should basically work the same. Tools You have two tasks involved: cutting it, and smoothing/polishing the edges. For both cutting and polishing, I used an angle grinder. In my case, I bought a 4-1/2 inch grinder ...


7

Well Jeff, the term corbel is new to me also. I always thought corbel was a champagne. But as far as supporting the granite: I think those corbels are quite ugly and rather than replace them with more ugly corbels, I'd be inclined to build a support structure around the top of the knee wall and trim it out. If you were to add a perimeter of 2×4's dressed ...


5

There are a lot of bad fabricators installing granite these days. I have seen everything from edges that are waxed instead of polished and tops that are dyed to make them look like a more expensive stone than the fabricator purchased. If they did a bad job there is no reason to believe any of it is done right. Do the water test suggested above. It will ...


4

Assuming you don't have extensive scratching or damage to your countertops, sometimes a simple acrylic sealer/refinsiher will work great. You will need to clean the tops thoroughly with a non abrasive cleaner and rinse completely. After they are dry, simply apply the acrylic sealer with a lint free smooth cloth evenly over the whole surface. Let this dry ...


4

Your question verges on asking for opinions rather than a technical answer. The functions of either type are identical. Stainless has always been considered the best choice for longevity and durability. The newer composites are very popular, but somewhat suspectable to scratching from hard metal cookware such as cast iron. I have seen some disclosures on ...


4

You have two good options with a stone counter top if there isn't a mounting strip already under the countertop. Option 1: Install a mounting strip under the counter, going all the way to the side cabinets and securing with some adhesive to the underside of the countertop (I've heard silicon suggested, but I'd prefer something stronger). I'd also use a ...


4

you can leave some water for an hour and see if the granite gets darker. If it does -then it's not sealed. It will dry in a day or so. I personally prefer not to seal it, because the sealant changes the color of granite. If you clean up the liquids right away it will be fine. Especially oils, wine and tomato juice. Many stores sell granite sealers, usually ...


3

You mean as a backsplash? Just about any material can be used: ceramic, glass, vinyl, ABS, wood, aluminum, steel, contact paper, etc. See this gallery for many ideas. While most of them are ceramic tile, which is the current fashion, look carefully and you'll see vinyls which look metallic. Here is Home Depot's version of that. We are considering that ...


3

Absolutely not. Epoxies are formulated for different cure times, cure temperatures, bonding to different materials, performance in various extreme environments, etc. That said, amongst the various hardware store 5 minute general purpose epoxies, I doubt there is a lot of difference between brands. I know nothing of the specifics for this application, I would ...


3

Based on the flexibility of the flat bar stock, I decided to use square 1/2" tube stock. Using a 3/4" MDF subtop, I routed channels 5/8" wide and 9/16" deep. I then filled these channels with polyurethane glue, set in the steel bars, and finally I used a drywall knife to spread and flatten glue over the top of the bars. Here are pictures of my actual ...


3

I had a similar countertop, and thought about making corbels, but ended up modifying pine shelf brackets from Lowes. I doubled them up, gluing two brackets together & filled the seam with wood putty.


3

I can't leave a picture on my comment, so I have to leave a whole new answer. Here is what I recently did. The one wall was not enough to support the counter top, so I put the T on the end. Also, as another answer... When I was looking for corbels for this, I found that Home Depot had corbels in two different places. One place was all the decorative ...


2

If you're looking for a modest, inexpensive solution, then wood corbels or some hybrid as discussed would be your answer. However, if you have the budget and desire a classy look to enhance that new granite countertop, I'd consider wrought iron corbels.


2

Yikes!!!! OMG!!!!! I cannot fathom a granite supplier not knowing if a permanent sealer was applied in the polishing process of their product. I would be talking to the owner of said company for answers. The granite comes to all fabricators from the miller and they know what finish is on them. Ask the right questions and you will get he right answers. ...


2

No. The tile beneath the pony wall should be removed. One of the things that a thinset and tile underlayment do is decouple the tile from the subfloor beneath it. By contrast, you explicitly want the pony wall supporting the slab to be coupled to the subfloor. Then the pony wall should be secured both to the subfloor and the cabinets against it. The ...


2

Anchoring them to studs is just fine, your main problem is going to be getting brackets that will support that amount of weight. The amount of weight each bracket will support will be printed on the package. I would consult your granite or stone supplier for weights of their products. You MUST make sure that you're anchored into studs, though, and ...


2

How much of an overhand do you plan on having? The spec I saw was that 10 inches were allowed with no supports. When the granite guy came to measure mine he told me I didn't really need them even at 12. I had alread put in corbels which look good, but do get in the way of knees. If I did it again, I would consider going to 10" and not having any bracking. ...


2

How do I clean my Natural Stone tiles and slabs? Clean stone surfaces with a few drops of neutral PH stone cleaner available at retail stores or at your local tile and stone dealer, or a mild liquid dishwashing detergent and warm water. Use a clean rag mop on floors and a soft cloth for other surfaces for best results. Too much cleaner or soap ...


2

Alignment, temperature, speed. All critical in cutting stone. A drill press or alignment jig would be better than just a handheld drill (and definitely not a hammer drill) and a constant water stream and slow speeds are necessary. At some point you are spending on tools close to what the stoneman wants. DIY is possible, but this is the kind of job I would ...


2

The makers of those tops will have the seam adhesive to join the tops permanently. If they are anything like Corian by Dupont, they want to protect their warranty. You may need to do some convincing to an installer to sell you the adhesive you need. It can be done, I have done it before. It takes a router or a belt sander to get the joint down flush after ...


1

To expand on wallyk's answer: nearly anything. It's really entirely up to you. The main two things to consider are maintainability (how easy is it to keep clean) and aesthetics (what do you like?) The range of options can include (but is not limited to): Tiles Ceramic (as you mention) glass metal stone etc Metal stainless steel copper etc ...


1

If there are high points above the desired end level, use a silicon carbide block (you'll find them in the masonry section, with grooves in the face and a big plastic handle on the back - roughly 4x8x2 inches) to grind them down. They work surprisingly well. If the floor you are trying to match is level, then a self-levelling underlayment product (generally ...


1

If you don't care about the existing granite, a hammer strike near a corner should split the slab and make it easy to wiggle a large flat blade screwdriver to "separate and lift". To minimize munging the cabinet, place a smallish piece of broken granite beside the next victim and use the former as a fulcrum.


1

You'll have to get it started somewhere, but a thin wire wrapped on a handle at each end (as for cutting cheese) will normally cut things off if glued with something reasonable (ie, silicone or similar.) If they epoxied it in place, it's going to be much more difficult. Heat would be my first approach in that case, hoping the stuff softens, or turns out to ...


1

You should be using a diamond wet hole bit. The link is to a very expensive one. You do not need this unless you are doing this daily. You can get one for much less at the big box or cheap hardware store. You don't need to have a wet drill but someone spraying water will help - my son uses a spray bottle and keeps squirting while I cut. Also you do ...


1

Definitely using the wrong drill bit. You should be using a masonry bit, which is designed for drilling into concrete, masonry, and stone. It has a different tip than a regular wood/metal bit.


1

Side mounting kits are a pain in the butt. You can use those but I think they are overkill. Your dishwasher mainly needs to keep from tipping over when you pull out a heavy rack. All dishwashers come with front mounting brackets. These can be attached to the bottom of stone. Silicone is a short-term answer. A little "knife grade epoxy" is what you need ...


1

I am guessing that your sink weight is causing the pressure, making the cracks worse. If I am right on this then the first thing you need to do is build a simple way to support the sink using wood or whatever - I have 2x2s that are screwed to side cabinet and pushed up to support it. So that will cost you $3. If side walls are not close enough you have to ...


1

What some manufactures call quartz is actually ground granite and epoxy or Silestone. In most cases they are great and don't require sealing like solid granite does. I suspect you may have purchased a bargain brand that is inferior to Silestone or solid granite or good grade Quartzite type. Also, do not confuse Stilestone or similar to real solid quartz ...


1

I don't know much about countertop weights, I've never done one, but I can tell you that flat steel is strongest along it's smallest edge. It's not supposed to be too rigid when flat. For example, if I have a quarter inch thick piece of steel, 3 inches wide and 1 foot long, if I put it down flat on 2 end supports and stood on it, it would bow. If I braced ...



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