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21

Even if the windows were super thick, it wouldn't be strong enough to handle the pressure exerted by a properly positioned ladder. A ladder is supposed to be sloped 25%, like this: With someone standing near the top of the ladder, that means roughly 20% of his weight is directed as lateral force, directly into the wall or window, conveyed by the points ...


18

There is a product called Window Security Film which is a thin (a couple mm) film that adheres to the window and makes it exceptionally difficult for someone to break. Many lock smiths/security companies can install it. Here's a video of it in action: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYdVK3BqPfk One of the biggest "problems" with it however is that because ...


17

Another angle - if it is the size of windows you are worried about, have you thought about altering the frontage to have smaller windows? It would then look less like a shop, and it would be easier to get toughened/laminated glass for the windows.


16

Put in a simple alarm system with glass break sensors. Dedicate it to the windows if necessary and leave it on all the time. If anyone ever tries to break a window the alarm will sound. You would not even need to have it monitored if all you want is peace of mind while sleeping.


16

Don't do it. Put the ladder above the window, then clean by putting your arms through the rungs. Shouldn't the windows have a way to tilt them inward and clean from inside the house? Most every modern window I've seen has a way to do that. You may want to get a ladder stabilizer:


10

I'm pretty sure bullet proof glass is not a viable option. A quick Google search came up with a 40" wide window for over $3k. I couldn't find anything nearly the size you mentioned, and I'm guessing the cost for increasing scale is not linear - you're talking at least tens of thousands of dollars here. My guess is that the glass would end up costing just ...


10

Either use a A frame ladder or a squeegee on a pole. I personally wouldn't trust my health on the structural strength of glass.


6

Mirrors are made up of two parts, the glass and then a reflective coating on the back. Because of this, they are not considered 100% glass and many times the town's recycle pickup (if your have one) for glass will not take them because there will be an additional process to separate the glass from the reflective material backing. Possible disposal methods: ...


6

If it's a high crime area, the typical solution is window bars on the first floor. If it's not a high crime area, I'd maybe not panic too much. Most burglaries are through the front or back door or an open window. Smashing large picture windows isn't typically the first choice of a burglar.


6

The nice thing about renting a place is that you don't own it. Problems with the house are really the owner's problem, not yours. If it were me, especially in the situation you've described, I'd call the landlord and say, 'Hey - come clean this crap up'. I certainly wouldn't invest in supplies or materials to do it. Take a look at your lease/rental ...


6

This sounds like a bad plan. 550 pounds (or more, likely) is just way too much weight to try to hack something together. Even if you put a support in the middle, then you need to make sure it's perfectly balanced or you're going to crack the aquarium at the pivot point — the glass tank is going to be very unforgiving of an uneven surface. Plus, think of ...


6

Glazing manufacturers have spent decades perfecting a spacer system that does not eventually leak and condense. They still haven't completely perfected it, though they are much better than 20 years ago. There is no way you're going to put together a system that does not eventually leak, especially with a vacuum. You'll have a better chance with inert gas, ...


5

I think you could just ask almost any glass shop to cut and drill the glass for you. That said, I'd probably want to use tempered glass for this and you can't drill tempered glass so you may want to come up with a different method for mounting.


5

I've used Artscape window film with great results. From what I remember, you just cut the film to size and use a squeegee and water with a bit of soap to adhere it to the glass. I'm not sure if they have a solid frosted pattern though. You'll most likely want to find a sheet big enough that you won't have any seams. One alternative to drilling holes for ...


5

Alternative idea. Test the sealer on a piece of left over tile. Let the sealer get onto the glass and wipe it up shortly thereafter. Compare the before/after -- if you see no notable damage, just put the stuff on and have someone clean up the glass right behind you.


4

One cheap and easy solution is to simply purchase alarm system stickers/signage from eBay. A potential burglar won't necessarily know that there's no system installed.


4

Maybe showerboard? I've used it in the past as a dry erase board. It comes in large sheets which you could attach to the wall via screws or hangers of some sort. A dab of white paint over the screw holes and you should be ok. I don't remember exactly how expensive it was but I don't think it was more than $20 per sheet ... and they were fairly large sheets. ...


4

Get a combo sponge / squeegee on an extendable pole. They work very well. It is also possible to get these window washing soap bottles that have an integrated sprayer mechanism. You attach these to a garden hose for water. They easily can spray a nice and vigorous soapy stream or water at the windows over 20 feet (like 6 meters) high. Normally the ...


4

Have you thought of a bathroom window film? It's very easy to put there, and it works really nicely. I mean one of these: They come in a variety of patterns, from plain to very fancy. I think they are easier to apply than the sprays (I've put them on couple windows without any problems). They are made to be in the bathroom so they last long, and the ...


3

CLR is best for removing buildup from calcium, lime, and rust. Just use it with care (well ventilated, and probably don't want it on your skin).


3

If it is in a frame 1/4" glass will be sufficient. Your options for glass will be tempered glass or laminated glass because of it's proximity to the ground. Tempered glass will break into very small pieces like a car window for a door. Tempered glass is stronger than normal glass. Laminated glass will break like a car windshield. It breaks normally but ...


3

If it's very long, I'd suspect that it's being physically distorted during the installation process since the glass itself is flexible enough to distort the image without breaking first. To correct it, you need to make sure that the mirror is as straight as possible - use shims. If it's along a wall, the mirror may be following the contours of a slightly ...


3

Suction cups are used with success in this situation. Search for "glass table suction cups". The cups have a small cylindrical nub that sits in a hole you will have to drill for each cup. You should only need about four. With the suction cups, the table would be secure, would have some (minimal) give when struck, and would be easy to replace.


3

I found this site which lists many different styles of textured glass. I think the particular one you had is somewhat close to the Florentine Wissmach on that site. As for the best site to search, I'd say google image search, honestly. https://www.google.com/search?q=textured+glass+window&source=lnms&tbm=isch


2

When applying thinset, put it on in a flat coat first,, and lay it on thick, pressing it against the wall or floor. THEN go back at an angle and notch it, removing excess. This makes sure the thinset has good contact with the wall over the whole area and will bond well. Laying it on at an angle, so it's notched in one pass, doesn't spread the thinset over ...


2

How about getting some electric hurricane shutters? Or get some nice ironwork to function as burglar bars. If you wanted something cheap and fast, get some 2 by 4's, cut them up in a design, screw them together with wood screws, putty them up, route the edges, sand them, a little paint and you have an instant burglar bar.


2

The type of glass by itself isn't a deterrent as most burglars don't look first, or they don't know what they are looking at. Signage is a greater deterrent. The window film as already suggested is most likely the simplest and cheapest solution. Bullet resistant glass will deter burglars once they throw a brick or take a few swings at the glass and ...



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