New answers tagged

-1

I was thinking the same as user19141. You can have more than one GFCI on a single branch circuit. But only if they are wired correctly. If we pretend we are electrons traveling down your circuit, It would leave the panel and go to your first GFCI at some point. If than at that first GFCI you leave that box on the load screws on your GFCI and run to a couple ...


-2

Okay, if what you described is correct, then the first problem is that you have too many of GFCIs on the same circuit. Now, that is only if they are wired to connect in series(line/load). They can also be wired to only function only at the point where it is installed(line/line) and not impact any other subsequent device. Check to insure that, if you do ...


1

Depends how they are wired - "star" wiring (where each outlet has its own wire leading back to a junction box) will give the described result, but is unusual. Then again, as implied in comments, a "pigtailed" circuit where each outlet is connected to a short wire that connects (typically with a wirenut in the box) to the wires leading to the source of power ...


0

I suspect the electronic circuitry of the AFCI is drawing some quite small current from hot to ground, which looks like a ground fault to the GFCI. This current is probably not enough to trip the GFCI normally, but when switching an additional load on the protected side of the GFCI, there could be some transient currents from hot to ground that take the GFCI ...


1

You most likely have an AFCI (Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter) not a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) on this circuit. Although it's not impossible that the breaker is bad, I think this is unlikely. It's more likely that there is an arc fault somewhere in the circuit. These can be hard to find, but worth the effort. I had a similar experience wiring a ...


1

Please do not remove the AFCI breaker. BMitch is correct is pointing out that breaker may be saving you from a fire, and removing it is certainly a violation of code. I had a similar experience wiring a new receptacle onto a circuit protected with an AFCI. After the new receptacle was installed, every time I switched on a steamer plugged into any receptacle ...


0

I believe you crossed the neutral wires when you replaced the GFCI plug. Switch the 2 white wires, and see what happens.


1

Uh-oh. Your voltage (hot to neutral) should not be 130V anywhere except a few countries where 127V is common. Start by measuring across the two hot "legs" in your panel. This value should be 220-240V, tending toward the latter, e.g. 238V. Now measure each leg to neutral, these should be very close to half that, and very close to each other, e.g. 118-...


0

I disconnected green (ground) and white (neutral) and measured resistance and it shows 0 Ohms. Does this mean that there is short between white and green? Yes, assuming you measured between the free ends of the wires. But it is normal for ground to be connected to neutral at the main panel. Note that measuring resistance of any wiring that might ...


0

It may not be higher load levels but a problem with GFCI's and motor loads, my state exemption for GFCI's includes refrigerator and freezers. If the refrigerator is the first outlet in your kitchen small appliance branch circuit a GFCI outlet can be added to the next outlet and be legal with NEC2014 code. I am out of town and do not have my code book but ...


2

The white wires from a GFCI or surge protector need to go to a neutral bus that is isolated from the ground bus in a sub-panel. You don't currently have that in the two-pole breaker enclosure that you have now. DON'T attach a GFCI neutral (white wire) to the ground bus. This is a violation of the code and can be dangerous as it puts neutral current on the ...


1

You cannot connect a sub-panel with only 3 wires unless it is 240 volt only (no neutral). By code, neutral and ground must only be bonded at the main panel (or main disconnect if separate). You cannot have them bonded at the sub.


2

You can change out the old breaker feeding the pump. This would be the safest way. A surge protector should be located close to your service this would then protect everything not just the pool. I voted up because it is easy to swap an old non GFCI for a GFCI protected breaker and this will make the current pool service much safer.


4

Connect the feeder wires to the LINE terminals on the GFCI. The feeder wires will be one set of black and white, which bring power to box. If there are two sets of feeder wires, you'll have to install two GFCI devices. As GFCI receptacles cannot be used to replace a split receptacle (where the two receptacles are supplied by separate branch circuits). Take ...


4

Following is an excerpt from the National Electrical Code: 406.4(D)(2) Non–Grounding-Type Receptacles. Where attachment to an equipment grounding conductor does not exist in the receptacle enclosure, the installation shall comply with (D)(2)(a), (D)(2)(b), or (D)(2)(c). (a) A non–grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted to be replaced with ...


3

Installing a non-grounded GFCI -- and properly labeling it as such -- is the correct solution to allow plugging in grounded appliances where no ground is available. As to why they did this at those specific locations, you'd have to ask the prior owner. Maybe that's where the fish tank was.



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