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GFCI outlets break. They don't last very long. I recommend replace it with a regular outlet and put a GFCI breaker in the panel. They are way more user friendly and cheaper.


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There are different types of GFCI, you may have one that is too sensitive for the job. A G type will trip immediately however a S or T will delay tripping and allow the current to stabilize during a surge like starting an induction motor.


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The GFCI is tripping on its own power draw. GFCI works by measuring the current on the hot and neutral wires entering the outlet. If there's more than a 5mA difference between the two, it trips. Doing that requires electronic circuitry that itself consumes power; coincidentally, this is typically in the range of 5mA-10mA. When you connect the neutral and ...


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GFCI devices work by comparing the current incoming on the hot wire to the current leaving on the neutral wire. If there's a difference, it means electricity is leaving the circuit somehow (a "ground fault") and the GFCI cuts power*. The GFCI doesn't do anything with the ground conductor—in fact, you don't even need to have one at all. One way of upgrading a ...


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I had a similar situation in my bathroom. I had power in the ceiling, to the light, and a 14/2 running down to the switchbox. My assumption is that the original install consisted only of the light switch, but had been "Upgraded" by everyone's favourite contractor, Some Moron. This esteemed craftsman put in a combo switch/receptacle, Jumpered the hot side ...


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Use a voltage tester like a "Wiggy" or a neon tester to test the presence of voltage at the wires. (not just in the socket of the GFI) If there is current in the wires, double-check that you have connected the power to the line side of the GFI, not the load side. Be sure that the neutral (white wire) and hot (black) are connected to the correct terminals ...


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Is the GFCI breaker in the outlet the fridge plugs into or is it a GFCI breaker in the breaker box? If its an outlet and you really want GFCI, you could try replacing the breaker in the box with a GFCI one and removing the on in the outlet. Or, like others have suggested, if this is a dedicated circuit to just the fridge and its in in the kitchen, just ...


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Residential Kitchen In a dwelling unit (residential), GFCI protection is only required for kitchen receptacles that serve the coutertop surfaces. There's no requirement to GFCI protect receptacles that serve a refrigerator. Unless the fridge is plugged into a coutertop receptacle. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection ...



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