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Normally, the grounding wire on a piece of equipment is intended to ensure that if a fault develops which would cause the chassis to become live, it will shunt away any as much current from the chassis as the main could supply to it, typically popping a breaker. A GFCI will ensure that if a conductive path would take current from the mains without feeding ...


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If it ain't broke, don't fix it. The pump is likely plugged into a single receptacle on a dedicated circuit, because there used to be an exception in the code that allowed a setup like that to avoid GFCI protection. It's possible that the pump will not play well with the GFCI, and then you'll be up shits creek (literally). It's quite possible that the ...


1

There should be no technical problem just replacing both outlets with GFCI units. For end of circuit branch they install pretty much just like a regular outlet. Just make sure to connect the wires in electrical box to the "LINE" terminals of the GFCI unit. When purchasing the GFCI units keep a lookout for the newer lower profile types that use up less back ...


1

GFCI is not required for dedicated circuits when a nuisance trip would be unfortunate - usages such as freezers or sump pumps. So, I would not put a GFCI on those circuits. They must, however, not have outlets that other appliances could be plugged into. The ejector pump is okay, but the sump pump does not conform to code, as it has another outlet. Two ...


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Current code leans to GFCI the heck out of it, and if it nusiance trips or fails (as they do with some regularity; typically about 10 years) and backs up sewage or water, tough noogies. People who sell GFCIs write the codes, and they have been expanding places where GFCIs are required for years. As of 2002 code (at least) there was still an exception for ...


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Your exterior outlet is GFCI protected so just (void the warranty) cut the plug off the pump and put one of these on it. The Field Test Survey Task Force examined 2,680 GFCIs installed in 1,090 residences in ten locations within the United States. The task force completed the study and this is the report of the findings. The task force has not attempted ...


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The NEC simply states "where supplied through a ground-fault circuit interrupter" in this instance, so you can achieve this either by a GFI receptacle, a faceless GFI device, or a GFI breaker. You cannot however use an AFCI breaker, unless it is one of the new (and rare) AFCI/GFCI breakers. Good luck finding one though. I find one Siemens on Amazon and ...


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If wired correctly, this is fine. GFCI outlets typically have line terminals (power input) and load terminals (power to other outlets, which will be protected by the GFCI.) Your contractor will have wired the outlet in the second bathroom to the load terminals of the GFCI in the main bathroom. There should also be a sticker on the outlet stating that it is ...


1

Yes, you can use this. GFCI breakers combine two different functions into one device. The circuit breaker function of the device is rated for 50 amps. However, because your 15 amp breaker is upstream from the GFCI, your circuit is protected at 15 amps, and will trip at 15 amps if there is a fault either before or after your GFCI. The GFCI function on the ...


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The red lead is wired to hot on BOTH the load and lead terminals of the GFCI. Likewise, the white lead is wired to neutral of both the load and lead terminals. This sounds insanely wrong, and if it is in fact an Edison circuit -- two hots, shared neutral -- then a GFCI cannot possibly work right because the current on the neutral will not be the same ...


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You want to get one of these: (A GFCI Outlet Tester). You plug it in, and it will check if your wiring is correct, or flipped. It is the fastest and best way to figure out why a GFCI outlet is not working right. To answer Question #2 in my experience working with both old and new(er) homes, contractors seem to cut corners. However, it is very dangerous to ...


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Without knowing the wiring gauge, it is not recommended to use a larger breaker. The breaker should be sized to the wire gauge and circuit load. You do not want to overload your wiring and risk damage (melted insulation, or even possibly a fire).


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You certainly can use it, it will definitely power it. However, you should consider the purpose of the breaker; A 50 Amp circuit breaker is designed to cut the power if you draw more than 50 amps. A 15 Amp breaker cuts at more than 15 amps, and so on. If your new hot tub electronics rated for a 15 amp breaker go haywire, and start drawing 25 amps, that is ...


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There is never a good time to use push in wiring of the receptacle. Does not hold tight especially after the outlet has seen a little bit of use. Wires loosen get hot and burn out and if you don't find in time it will burn your house down!


2

Let's get one thing straight. Ground-Fault Circuit Interrupter protection for personnel is designed and intended to protect a human (or any animal I guess), from being electrocuted (killed) due to an electrical fault. In most situations, the grounding system will handle any direct faults to ground. A GFCI devices is there to protect you, if you happen to ...


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Your description makes it clear that the fan is not directly over the tub or shower, so no GFI protection would be required. As Tester says though, if it makes you more comfortable you can GFI protect it. Personally I would not bother.


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I would be less worried with the strict interpretation of what the code requires here than the reason that the code exists. An exhaust fan's purpose in a bathroom is to remove moisture from the room. Moisture and electricity generally do not mix safely, so I would put it on a GFCI protected branch regardless of whether it is required by code in your ...


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I discussed this concern with the manufacturer (Pass & Seymour by Legrand) and they were able to provide me with a clear answer. The model number is 1595W3PKCC4 - and per design, upon being energized for the first time, these GFCIs are supposed to trip to test themselves. All subsequent cycling of power is not supposed to cause the GFCI to trip. It was ...



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