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Based on your diagram, it appears as though it should be wired like this... Notice that the white wire to the switch, has been marked with black tape/marker at both ends. This signifies that it's being used as an ungrounded (hot) conductor. When hooking up the GFCI, make sure you use the LINE terminals. If you use the LOAD terminals, the device will ...


1

When wiring with cable, and the feed is coming to the light, the standard is to feed a single pole with the white wire (the code requires this) and return with the black wire. If you connect the white wire to the other white wires at the light fixture you create a dead short when the switch is closed this would trip the GFCI if you are downstream from it. ...


0

The old way of running kitchen plugs was to split the top and bottom plugs so each plug was on a seperate feed. This was accomplished by running 3 wire between the plugs and removing the breaker tabs, the entire thing was conected to a dual pole break so the entire plug would trip at once. If your house was built to code before the advent of gfci this is ...


1

If this is a new outlet run take all 3 wires to the switch box the white wire nutted together white to white. The ground you will want to pig tail a ~6" piece to the switch green screw. The black is put on the switch (I usually put the hot on top) and feed the outlet on bottom. Just an FYI Garbage disposals are notorious for eating GFCI's so it may be a good ...


2

Tester101 nailed the question, so I'll cover another option. Depending on your situation, it is often possible to retrofit ground. Normally, wires in a circuit must be kept together for good reason. Ground is a special case, it can be routed separately from the other wires in a retrofit situation. That is because ground is not used to flow current ...


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They are not grounded, though may be GFCI protected. If they are wired off the load side of the GFCI, then they are GFCI protected. In which case they should be labeled with stickers that say "GFCI PROTECTED", and "NO EQUIPMENT GROUND ".


2

No, they are not grounded. Yes, they are GFCI protected (as long as they are on the LOAD side of the GFCI). You are allowed to protect older ungrounded outlets by GFCI protecting them, though it's still preferable (but more invasive) to actually get ground wires everywhere. If you have any 3-prong outlets without a ground, they must be GFCI protected and ...


2

You can run the fridge but not the dishwasher as shown in exhibit 210.28. It also depends on where you live local code may have exemptions or tougher requirements. I usually run a dedicated circuit for the fridge. There is an exception that allows a gas stove igniter and a clock outlet on the 2 small appliance circuit. The wording is counter top a ...


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Recently , I had 10 wall outlets to stop working because of a dead dropline coming the pole to my meter . Most of the ceiling lights and 2 wall outlets worked .


3

You have confirmed my suspicion that, with the switch off, the outlet and the light are in series. That is the reason that both light dim when a 100 watt light is plugged in. The fact that the outlet shows hot/neutral reversed when the switch is off tells me exactly what the "electrician" did. The outlet must be wired as follows: the hot side of the ...


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Just confirming you have 2 potentials: Smoker actually has a Ground Fault GFCI is bad None of which are a good thing. Determine the smoker is good by testing on a known good GFCI outlet (no extension) to eliminate the easiest fix, changing the GFCI. If the smoker is bad, try to identify the damage and and repair or replace it.


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The GFCI is tripping for a reason. Older ones sometimes tripped for false positives, but that's very rare with modern fuses/interrupters. Especially if the outlet interrupts with the same appliance every time then the problem is the appliance not the outlet. Do some troubleshooting on the grill to find out if you can repair it, or need to replace it. It ...


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Modern GFCI devices will not set if the LINE and LOAD are reversed. If there's power on the LOAD wires, the device will not (and should not) set. It sounds like the GFCI is working as designed. You're going to have to figure out how both circuits are wired, to determine if this is intentional or accidental. If it's intentional, you can simply cap one set ...


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Either the GFCI is malfunctioning and needs to be replaced, or thge stove's electronics are malfunctioning and need to be repaired. Without more information we can't tell you which.


-1

Todays GFCI breakers also have 'arc-fault' detection, which means that some tiny amount of current in the wiring is leaking from the hot wire to neutral or ground, or the breaker has tripped too many times and its contacts have burned out - which will create arcing, making it a self-tripping breaker. I had this problem and fixed it by replacing the GFCI ...


6

This is trouble, but easily solved. Simply swap out the 50 ampere GFCI breaker, for a 15 ampere GFCI breaker. You'll possibly have to use pigtails to connect to the breaker, as it may not accept the size wire used for the existing circuit. As "subpanels" seem to be quite popular around here, I'm surprised it hasn't been suggested yet. You could always ...



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