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@ user770395, Tester101 is correct but you also have to use a Weather Proof Cover when the receptacle can come into direct contact with water. I would use a In-use cover(1) but you could use a Weather Proof Cover but not a In-use cover(2). The in-use cover can still be shut and protect the outlet, while the not in-use cover can not.


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Yes. If the receptacle is in a wet or damp location, the receptacle must be a weather-resistant type. In a damp location, you can use any weatherproof cover. In a wet location, you must use an "extra-duty" cover. "Extra-duty" covers, provide weatherproofing even when a cord is attached to the receptacle. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 4 ...


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Probably no reason to use a WR outlet. The "WR" rating may not mean what you think it means. The primary difference between a WR outlet and a regular one is the WR one uses a special kind of plastic that does not get as brittle when cold and has better UV protection so it does not get damaged by direct sunlight. It does not provide any additional water ...


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This really isn't that odd and yes you can replace them with GFCI's. It is common with multi-wire branch circuits, or in cases where one outlet is switched and another isn't. In the case of the black and red wire, one is hot and one is neutral. You can identify which one is hot with a multi-meter or non-contact tester (though NC testers can sometimes be ...


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Assuming you mean you can't reset the GFI even when nothing is plugged into it: Yes, they can wear out and may need to be replaced. Obviously, turn off the power at the circuit breaker before removing this one and installing the replacement. If you can reset it with nothing plugged in, then the problem is probably the appliance rather than the GFI. Get it ...


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While functionally the same, it is simpler to replace a receptacle gfci than a breaker. It is a bit scary for some to pull the cover off and work on an open panel. And it is dangerous. It is safer to simply cut the power from the panel, switch it out and be done with it. The receptacle also constrains the coverage area, which is an unknown in the case of ...


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There are two reasons that I can think of off the top of my head. 1) A GFCI breaker when tripped kills the entire circuit, including things you may not want to be killed. 2) According to an electrician friend, the breakers are a bit more sensitive and so nuisance trip more often.


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The top few possible reasons are: Ease of access- it's easier to reset a tripped GFCI in the same room. Easier to retrofit- it's easier for a homeowner to install a receptacle than to dig around in the panel. Even if this type of panel work is trivial, most people just aren't comfortable with it. Cost- one GFCI receptacle is cheaper than a GFCI breaker. If ...


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Both forms exist. The receptacle version can be installed by any reasonably handy individual. The breaker-box version provides broader coverage but is beyond the skills of most amateurs --- I could do it, but I would not be comfortable doing it. Also, some of us have old boxes which make simply finding a compatible breaker a challenge; manufacturers of ...



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