New answers tagged

1

So here is the end of the story. After a week of hot dry weather the breaker didn't trip anymore. On Friday morning I tired to turn it on and it stayed on. So wherever the moisture was......was gone. At this point not sure of this is a temporary fix or log term. I put some electrical tape around a few of the areas that should already be water tight. I ...


-1

I Think Line means the side FROM which power is coming as opposed to LOAD being the terminal on the power receiving side. You have a power Line coming out of wall junction. You have a load terminal on whatever device being wired. Basically means opposite ends of same circuit. Is th


0

It is true current code requires AFCI/ GFCI , but you are not required to use AFCI's if you want to update to GFCI's. There are 2 ways to accomplish the upgrade to GFCI' s the first is install a 2 pole GFCI breaker in your panel this would require going to the panel to reset a fault. The 2nd would be use 2 GFCI outlets the first 2 outlets would not be split. ...


3

Technically, the only way to accomplish what you're asking is to use a double pole 20A GFCI breaker, as there is no such thing as multi-wire branch circuit GFCI receptacle. Preferably, if it existed, you'd use a double pole 20A DFCI "Dual GFCI + AFCI" breaker, but until then your only option is the GFCI double pole. Credit goes to SpeedyPetey for ...


3

From the National Electrical Code 210.11(C)(3) Bathroom Branch Circuits. In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section, at least one 20-ampere branch circuit shall be provided to supply bathroom receptacle outlet(s). Such circuits shall have no other outlets. Exception: Where the 20-ampere circuit supplies a ...


-2

Was the replacement breaker also a GFI breaker? Sometimes if those GFI DEVICES even smell moisture they will trip. Change to a regular breaker without the GFI and go from there.


2

An unmentioned part of the question is the fact that the OP is trying to combine components of two incompatible electrical systems: the newer Decora system, and the older system it replaces (I don't know the name...) The Decors outlet in question does not lack a central screw hole because of the GFC buttons. Such a central hole is not found on any Decors ...


1

While the advice in other answers appears correct, it is critical to connect the "line" and "load" wires correctly to the GFCI. Here's a picture from a help page You can ignore the GFCI on the left.


0

Yes,I belive it should be covered,better safe than sorry. I would also recommend onw of the covers that keep it dry while in use.


1

You need to ground your switches -- Code requires it. And yes, standard single pole switches work here. Also -- depending on where the fixtures are located, you may wish to put one or more of them on the load side of the GFCI. Make sure that the existing black and white wires on your diagram go to the LINE terminals on the GFCI outlet!


0

That looks correct. Your ground(bare) and neutral(white) will all be nutted together. Then the black and red wires (hot) will attach to the switches (all appear to be single pole since none are in a series) The only thing I would suggest is making sure you ground the switches. Sometimes code will demand it, but it's also a good idea since it's a wet ...


3

In my experience, most listed covers do a lousy job actually preventing water ingress. This is common; actual practice in electrical work is to use listed products which then proceed to leak anyway. I see remote powerboards all the time with top entry and water getting into every single thing water is not supposed to get into, lots of breaker and GFCI ...


1

Yes, it should be covered. However, you might want to check the circuit breaker that feeds the line. If the old outlet was just a regular socket, it is quite possible that the line is on a GFCI circuit breaker. If that is the case, you can simply replace the old outlet with a new one of the same type, and re-use your old cover. In this case, the GFCI ...


2

Must outdoor GFCI power outlets be covered? YES You get an Appropriate cover. They are available and come in many styles depending on the Weatherproof Box you have installed the outlet in. This thing is designed to save you from electrical shock. WHY do you want to defeat its safety features? You do not like the appearance of the cover?


19

Why play with electricity like that? Install one of these: For use while connected: or, for occasional temporary use where it can be closed and unused during wet weather:


4

The main disadvantage is that your simple cover is not to code in most jurisdictions. In addition, gfci outlets aren't really designed to get splashed, so don't be surprised if it fails prematurely. (I know you said overhang, but rain can be carried by high winds.) I'd spend the 10 bucks and get a nice in-use cover. (The type that allows you to have ...


-2

If there is a shared neutral then GFCI will not work


0

The main difference between your old GFCI plug and the new one you propose is that 2 wire only GFCI plugs lack what is called a grounded neutral detection circuit -- this circuit helps improve the GFCI's sensitivity to neutral-to-ground faults. This grounded neutral detection is unnecessary but harmless when the load is ungrounded -- your situation is no ...


3

Your friend is out of his league here A GFCI outlet has two sets of terminals on it -- LINE terminals for the power IN as well as LOAD terminals that connect to the GFCI's protected hot and neutral in addition to that protected hot and neutral being provided to the GFCI's face receptacles. Hardwired applications can use what's called a "faceless" GFCI ...


3

To save $ we daisy chain outlets, 1 GCI outlet can cover others. If the first outlet in a string is protected and correctly wired,. All the outlets on the load side are just as safe, and will trip. With a cheap outlet tester with the GFCI test function you can test this out!! This is a case where you now know more than ha does!!!


-1

I was thinking the same as user19141. You can have more than one GFCI on a single branch circuit. But only if they are wired correctly. If we pretend we are electrons traveling down your circuit, It would leave the panel and go to your first GFCI at some point. If than at that first GFCI you leave that box on the load screws on your GFCI and run to a couple ...


-2

Okay, if what you described is correct, then the first problem is that you have too many of GFCIs on the same circuit. Now, that is only if they are wired to connect in series(line/load). They can also be wired to only function only at the point where it is installed(line/line) and not impact any other subsequent device. Check to insure that, if you do ...



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