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5

The NEC simply states "where supplied through a ground-fault circuit interrupter" in this instance, so you can achieve this either by a GFI receptacle, a faceless GFI device, or a GFI breaker. You cannot however use an AFCI breaker, unless it is one of the new (and rare) AFCI/GFCI breakers. Good luck finding one though. I find one Siemens on Amazon and ...


0

Short Answer: Yes, you're totally fine. The GCFI receptacle will "protect" every subsequent outlet, switch, or fixture on the same circuit. Example: On the same circuit, listed from breaker, you have (1) Hallway outlet, (2) Hallway light switch, (3) *Bathroom GFCI, (4) Bathroom light switch, (5) Bathroom fan switch, (6) Bedroom light switch, (7) Bedroom ...


16

If wired correctly, this is fine. GFCI outlets typically have line terminals (power input) and load terminals (power to other outlets, which will be protected by the GFCI.) Your contractor will have wired the outlet in the second bathroom to the load terminals of the GFCI in the main bathroom. There should also be a sticker on the outlet stating that it is ...


1

Yes, you can use this. GFCI breakers combine two different functions into one device. The circuit breaker function of the device is rated for 50 amps. However, because your 15 amp breaker is upstream from the GFCI, your circuit is protected at 15 amps, and will trip at 15 amps if there is a fault either before or after your GFCI. The GFCI function on the ...


0

The red lead is wired to hot on BOTH the load and lead terminals of the GFCI. Likewise, the white lead is wired to neutral of both the load and lead terminals. This sounds insanely wrong, and if it is in fact an Edison circuit -- two hots, shared neutral -- then a GFCI cannot possibly work right because the current on the neutral will not be the same ...


0

You want to get one of these: (A GFCI Outlet Tester). You plug it in, and it will check if your wiring is correct, or flipped. It is the fastest and best way to figure out why a GFCI outlet is not working right. To answer Question #2 in my experience working with both old and new(er) homes, contractors seem to cut corners. However, it is very dangerous to ...


-1

Without knowing the wiring gauge, it is not recommended to use a larger breaker. The breaker should be sized to the wire gauge and circuit load. You do not want to overload your wiring and risk damage (melted insulation, or even possibly a fire).


0

You certainly can use it, it will definitely power it. However, you should consider the purpose of the breaker; A 50 Amp circuit breaker is designed to cut the power if you draw more than 50 amps. A 15 Amp breaker cuts at more than 15 amps, and so on. If your new hot tub electronics rated for a 15 amp breaker go haywire, and start drawing 25 amps, that is ...


-2

There is never a good time to use push in wiring of the receptacle. Does not hold tight especially after the outlet has seen a little bit of use. Wires loosen get hot and burn out and if you don't find in time it will burn your house down!


2

Let's get one thing straight. Ground-Fault Circuit Interrupter protection for personnel is designed and intended to protect a human (or any animal I guess), from being electrocuted (killed) due to an electrical fault. In most situations, the grounding system will handle any direct faults to ground. A GFCI devices is there to protect you, if you happen to ...


0

Your description makes it clear that the fan is not directly over the tub or shower, so no GFI protection would be required. As Tester says though, if it makes you more comfortable you can GFI protect it. Personally I would not bother.


2

I would be less worried with the strict interpretation of what the code requires here than the reason that the code exists. An exhaust fan's purpose in a bathroom is to remove moisture from the room. Moisture and electricity generally do not mix safely, so I would put it on a GFCI protected branch regardless of whether it is required by code in your ...


1

I discussed this concern with the manufacturer (Pass & Seymour by Legrand) and they were able to provide me with a clear answer. The model number is 1595W3PKCC4 - and per design, upon being energized for the first time, these GFCIs are supposed to trip to test themselves. All subsequent cycling of power is not supposed to cause the GFCI to trip. It was ...


0

If you only have two wires one white and one black the white connects to the silver LINE terminal and the black connects to the brass LINE terminal the LOAD terminals are only needed for protecting other outlets downstream from that one . If you have a green or bare wire it needs to connect to the green screw and the box if it is metal.


0

Line is the side of the device where the wires from the panel (or other equipment feeding the device) are connected. Load is where any devices that are to be protected by the GFCI device are connected. Most "newer" GFCI devices will not reset if they are not connected probably. GFCI devices use a current transformer (CT), to detect any current ...


0

This sounds highly unusual some plug mounted gfci s need to be reset whenever they receive power but as you said you can unplug it and plug it in without having to reset it so I would check the wiring at the switch to make sure that it is breaking the hot wire and not the neutral also make sure the bare ground wire is not contacting the neutral at the outlet ...


0

I have had some (primarily plug-in extension-cord units) that do exactly that, every time power is cycled. I do not know what the expected behavior of the model you bought is - try contacting the manufacturer. Do they stay set (remain powered on) if the breaker is on, and then you reset them? Do they trip if you test them?



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