Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

From your diagram it looks like the grounded (neutral) conductor connected to the light (that trips the GFCI), does not come from the GFCI device. It looks like the grounded (neutral) wire is coming from the feeder to the circuit, instead. Because of this, you'll have current flow through the GFCI device on the ungrounded (hot) conductor that does not ...


0

This was something the builder just did (I wouldn't even call it convenience/cost, for that matter). We start with 210.52(B)(1): (1) Receptacle Outlets Served. In the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling unit, the two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits required by 210.11(C)(1) shall serve all ...


1

You should wire it according to the manufacturers documentation.


0

GFCI Protection of Switch and Receptacle If you want to provide GFCI protection to the entire combination device (both switch and receptacle), you'll want to provide a single feed from the load side of the GFCI to the device. Connect a short bit of black wire to the brass colored LOAD terminal on the GFCI. Connect the other end of that black wire to ...


2

I don't know your "switch/outlet" combination in detail, but I'd guess there might be a connection by default (ie, the switch is tied to the outlet unless you break a tab) that's getting upset by the switch being fed from the line side and the outlet being fed from the load side of the GFCI. In any case, the disposal probably ought to be connected to the ...


3

If you use a GFCI breaker, you don't need GFCI receptacles. As long as the breaker provides the level of protection required at the outlet. Dual Function Circuit Interrupter (DFCI) breakers are reliable. "Home run" is not a technical term. It may be used to describe a dedicated circuit, where the circuit only supplies a single device. It may also describe ...


0

You could rewire it with stranded wire pigtails, this would add flexibility and relieve stress.


1

Unless the specific device requires it, there's no requirement to use the back wire terminals. It's simply a personal preference to do it that way. If you're having trouble using the back wire terminals, it's probably safer for you to not use them (unless of course the device requires it). You'll also want to check the markings on the device, and read ...


2

The only way to accomplish this, is to install the GFCI device before the switch. The easiest solution, would be to install a GFCI breaker to protect the entire circuit. The receptacles on a GFCI receptacle are connected to the GFCI circuitry internally, and cannot be separated without modifying the device (which is not recommended).


2

If you mean a GFCI duplex receptacle, no. The way to do this would be to use a GFCI (either duplex receptacle type or barefaced) for the GFCI function, and from its "LOAD" terminals provide power to two switches, which you would connect to the outlet you wanted to control - if part of a duplex outlet, you would break the tabs connecting the two sides of the ...


2

I'd have to suspect that you are perhaps not always getting the part where the wire actually ends up between the plates right - to Quote @shirlocks answer "Just be sure to tip the device so the grab plates open before inserting the wires." If the wires are in the right place and the screws are tight THIS flavor of back wiring is VERY secure (as distinct from ...


1

Sure, within limits - it may depend where the GFCI is and where in the world you are - if the prevailing electrical code requires a circuit dedicated to one room, and you extend it beyond that room, you would be violating code. Other than THAT, yes, it's certainly possible - connect from the LOAD terminals on the GFCI to the first outlet, from the first ...


1

In general, yes. GFCI outlets have LINE and LOAD terminals. You can connect several more outlets on the LOAD terminals, and they will also be protected from ground faults. You can also add a switch, though bear in mind that highly inductive loads (like a large motor) can cause nuisance tripping of the GFCI.



Top 50 recent answers are included