New answers tagged

1

RCD will trip on a ground fault. Sometimes an older refrigerator or garbage disposal will cause them to trip. Since it appears to have a cycle it may be a defrost setting in the refrigerator causing the fault. It is possible the breaker itself is faulty but I would expect a more random tripping if this was the case. Are there any other appliances that have a ...


-1

I'm unsure why you disconnected it to begin with but first I would make sure you reconnected it properly and it's not connected to a similar type of breaker as well in the panel. Depending on the location of it and what was being used for, these outlets do go bad and in the end need to be replaced. If you recheck all the wiring connections and they are done ...


1

If the device is not wired probably, it will not set. Make sure you've wired the LINE and LOAD terminals properly. Make sure you use the markings on the device, and don't simply wire it how the old one was. The LINE terminals are where the wires coming from the source should connect, while the LOAD terminals are where the wires going to other devices ...


1

Actually, it was the reset button, which needed to be pressed after flipping the breaker switch on.


-1

I have been told by an engineer who designs these, that an inductive inrush current on the line conductor can and will trip the receptacle, it just depends upon the magnitude and time duration of the event. The newer production units are much faster than the older ones and monitor all 3 wired connections. This does apply to a transformer or in your case a ...


2

The code doesn't allow 240v circuits to have 120v loads on them. For instance putting a receptacle on a water heater or Air Conditioning circuit is not allowed. The heater needs to be moved to a separate two pole breaker sized at 125% of the heater load. A GFCI is not require for a space heater.


5

Everything downstream of the GFCI has to be connected to both the Hot and Neutral from the Load side of the GFCI. The way you've wired it, when the heater kicks on, current is flowing from the Load side of the GFCI through the heater and back to the panel without returning through the GFCI's neutral connection, so the GFCI sees an imbalance and trips. I ...


2

Whether or not the GFCI is the first as far as proximity from the panel, it would have to be the first if you want it to protect the other receptacles. However, since you're going the route of covering so many receptacles. I'd recommend just getting a GFCI breaker to cover the whole line. Do you want to have all of the receptacles GFCI covered? You would ...


0

The hot line side needs to have the black wire to the brass screw on the line connector side. The white wire from the same cable that the black came from goes to the silver line side. The load side to your outlets black to brass and white to silver and the bare coppers tied together and attached to the GFCI and outlet ground screws usually green in color. I ...


0

Make sure that the nuetral wire is isolated. In other words the nuetral wire servicing that gfci only serves that outlet and is not shared with or wire nutted together with another. The electrical storm may have slightly damaged something on a circuit that shared the same nuetral. Just a thought.


0

Both the black wires currently on the receptacle, need to be connected together with a pigtail. The pigtail will then connect to the brass colored LINE terminal on the new GFCI. The white wire from the old receptacle, will attach to the silver colored LINE terminal of the new GFCI. The grounding conductors should also be pigtailed, and a pigtail terminated ...


2

Most likely as simple as a bad/weak GFI receptacle, especially if it is older. Have you tried leaving it with nothing plugged in? Are there other receptacles on the LOAD side of this GFI?


3

Short-circuit current is the amount of short-circuit current the device can safely handle, so it should be greater than or equal to the short-circuit rating of the device protecting it. For example. If the GFCI has a short-circuit current rating of 10 kA. Then the short-circuit protection device protecting it (likely a circuit breaker), should have a ...


3

I checked a few GFCI data sheets and they all listed either a 10kA Short Circuit Current Rating or Max Interrupting Capacity. Leviton GFCI Cooper Industries GFCI Hubbell GFCI I'm assuming that this is similar to the 10kA rating on common household circuit breakers where the device is required to break at least 10kA. Cooper Industries has a PDF that ...


3

In the vernacular: no, a GFCI device is not a circuit breaker unless it says it's a combination GFCI/breaker. Technically speaking: a GFCI contains circuit breaker switching guts, but replaces the normal thermal-magnetic trip with a differential trip, or adds the differential trip in the case of a combo device. Large circuit breakers (industrial/commercial ...


4

I don't think the argument was that a GFCI was designed to be a circuit breaker, but that something in their construction caused them to trip due to an overload. I can say with 100% certainty that GFCI devices are not designed, nor intended to take the place of circuit breakers. However, without actually seeing the internal circuitry, or the design ...


15

No. Each type of device serves a distinctly separate protective purpose. Breaker A circuit breaker detects overcurrent faults, it does not detect ground faults. A circuit breaker will stop your house catching fire when the wiring in the walls overheats from prolonged overcurrent, it wont stop you and your family being killed by electrocution. A typical ...


0

Quick answer: Unless your disposal leaks current via ground or via the water/sewer line, you won't have any problems. More details: GFCI is really great for appliances that interface with water during the cource of their normal duties. Sumps, washers, disposals, sprinkler systems. As they degrade, they are especially able to cause dangerous leakage current ...


1

The problem is the physical constraints of wiring. Wiring is not a loop (in the US). GFCI's are not magic. In this circuit, the outlets are "daisy chained" - power comes from the service panel (breaker box) to one outlet, then to the next, then to the next. There's an "upstream" (toward the service panel) and a downstream. A GFCI outlet can only protect ...


3

The physical location of the two devices does not matter, it's just how the GFCI is wired. If you wire a GFCI one way, it'll protect every receptacle after it - if you wire it another, it'll only protect itself. If you simply want the GFCI to only protect itself, then just switch the wiring and leave it where it's at. However, if you'd like it to be in that ...



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