Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Excellent thread! Thank you for all of the great information. I have a maybe 15 year old vertical door refrigerator/freezer combo that has operated just fine on GFCI receptacles for years in 3 different houses and now it is suddenly tripping the GFCI circuit after one year in the same outlet? I have the refrig temporarily powered from a non-GFCI outlet ...


2

A characteristic called inductance makes some electrical devices behave like a flywheel; when current is flowing, it will want to keep flowing. Just as it takes torque to stop a flywheel, it takes voltage to stop current. Some kinds of motors have significant inductance; if current is flowing from hot, through the motor, to neutral when the switch is ...


6

I'd use a 4x4 box with a raised cover. You can get the cover in a dual GFI configuration. You say a "GFI slave", I assume you just mean another receptacle on the load side. If so then you can get a cover with one GFI opening and one duplex opening: Just so you know, there is a near zero chance that that old AC cable can safely be used as a grounding ...


3

Yes. You can protect the downstream receptacles, by supplying them from the LOAD side of a GFCI device. Or you could install new cable.


3

Yes, GFCIs can go bad over time. And yes, they can block power to the entire downstream circuit. In fact, it's better that they do that than the other way around. You don't want a faulty GFCI providing power to a circuit that they're unable to protect. However, they're not guaranteed to do that, which is why you should test them regularly.


2

GFCI devices work by measuring the current flowing on the ungrounded (hot), and grounded (neutral) conductors. They do this by running both the conductors through a current transformer (CT), which produces a current on the secondary winding whenever there's a difference in current between the two primary conductors. So as long as both the ungrounded and ...


3

You need to install a 20 ampere double pole GFCI breaker, instead of two single pole breakers.


0

There isn't a way that you can use a GFCI breaker on this circuit. The way a GFCI works, roughly speaking, is by measuring the current leaving on the hot wire and comparing it to the current returning on the neutral. The two currents should be identical – any difference is indicative of current "escaping" via a different ground path, possibly through a ...


2

You'll need a double-pole GFCI breaker, wired like so: What you have described is a multiwire branch circuit. Because the neutral is shared, the overcurrent protection device(s) (in your case the two separate breakers) must be able to trip together. This can be remedied by installing a double-pole breaker, or by handle-tying two individual breakers. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included