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17

Yes you can be electrocuted even with an operating GFCI. A GFCI will only trip if current goes from the hot and does not return on the neutral. That means it will trip if you stick a fork into the hot and jump into the bathtub / touch the fridge while holding it (because the current on the hot is NOT seen on the neutral - the power is escaping through the ...


16

Shirlock has a great answer; I just wanted to point out something. There are two major different designs for back-wiring, "push-in" and "side-clamp". Push-in wiring, sometimes branded "QuickWire", uses holes in the plastic casing, underneath which are sharp spring-loaded cleats that catch and hold the wire when you put it in. To remove them, you take a ...


14

Not an uncommon problem. I have had a lot of problems with GFI's the last few years myself. There are a few likely causes: A fault still exists and will not allow the GFI to reset. The GFI tripped due to an overload and the differential circuit was damaged, thus the outlet is now toast. This seems to be a common complaint with standard 15 amp GFIC's. they ...


14

You should never chain two GFCI circuits together. When you install a GFCI circuit, you should only ever chain standard outlets off of them. Multiple GFCI on the same circuit can cause each other to trip. So yes, what you want to do is actually what you should do. What you do need to do, however, is make sure you connect the new outlet to the LOAD ...


11

All outlets that support convenience plug in items within 8 feet of a water source must be GFI protected. However, the new NEC calls for a separate non GFI circuit (home run) for the fridge or other fixed appliances. These non protected circuits must be single purpose and wired to a single outlet or direct wired and dedicated to the appliance. This can ...


11

There are no NEC guides, UL and CSA rules on or approves devices. The reason I commented on using back wiring on GFI's, is that if you look carefully inside the holes, you will see a barbed plate that compresses on the wire when the side screw is tightened. You will also notice because the devise itself is very wide, there is little barrier space around the ...


10

I would start troubleshooting by disconnecting the Load side of the GFCI, this will tell you if the problem is upstream or downstream from the receptacle. Turn off the breaker supplying the GFCI. Disconnect the wires on the Load side of the GFCI. Turn the breaker back on. Press the reset button on the GFCI. If the GFCI resets with nothing connected to ...


9

It's probably a good idea for both. A GFCI measures the difference between current into a circuit on the live wire and current out of it on the neutral; the ground wire just helps to make sure that in an electrical fault, the current isn't passing through you to ground. So a GFCI would be good in the places that current code calls for them: kitchens, ...


9

The NEC (NFPA 70 2011 edition) requires GFCI receptacles in kitchens of dwelling units where the receptacles are installed to serve the countertop surfaces. It does not mention a distance requirement in kitchens. The distance requirement of 1.8 meters (6 feet) is for sinks located in areas other than kitchens. Section 210.8 A of NFPA 70 2011 Edition deals ...


9

Neutrals shouldn't be connected together with the GFCI. Connect the neutral of the line and load to the appropriate connections on each side of the GFCI. Otherwise, the current will appear to go out via the hot connection and not return via the neutral on the load side of the connection, which is exactly the scenario that the GFCI detects and trips on. ...


9

GFCI receptacles have two sets of contacts, line, and load. The Line side of the receptacle is used to power the device, while the load side is used to power other devices down the line. Any device connected to the load side of a GFCI receptacle, will be protected by the GFCI receptacle. For example, if you have a setup like this (which I assume you ...


9

This is the correct behavior. You only need 1 GFCI outlet per circuit (assuming it's at the beginning of the line and the rest of the outlets are loads). They are correctly wired in parallel - if they were in series, you wouldn't get the correct voltage at the other outlets when there is any type of load present.


8

Sounds like the circuit is sharing a neutral with another circuit. With your GFCI breaker installed, turn off all other breakers. Reset the GFCI breaker, it should now hold. If it does not hold, then you have a problem with the wiring on that circuit and need to open each box to investigate. If the GFCI breaker holds now, turn each breaker on one at a time ...


8

Yes, it is OK, assuming your work to pigtail everything is done correctly (hot, neutral, and ground all pigtailed, with the box also grounded if it is metal). You can test each receptacle individually with others in on and off states to be sure. I assume your location is North America based on the circuit capacity and nomenclature used for wire sizing.


8

The National Electrical Code (NEC) does not require bathroom exhaust fans to be GFCI protected, however, there is this bit in Article 110. 110.3 Examination, Identification, Installation, and Use of Equipment. (B) Installation and Use. Listed or labeled equipment shall be installed and used in accordance with any instructions included in the listing ...


7

NEC GFCI requirements Underwater pool lighting since 1968 On Receptacles: Outdoors (since 1973) Bathrooms (since 1975) Garages (since 1978) Kitchens (since 1987) Crawl spaces and unfinished basements (since 1990) Wet bar sinks (since 1993) Laundry and utility sinks (since 2005) Looking for any further wiggle room? Feeling that light tingle in damp ...


6

A GFCI works by making sure that amperage is equal at all times between the hot and neutral sides of the circuit. If this is ever not true, power is "leaking" from the circuit because of a short to ground, either "safely" through an appliance's metal shell to the ground leg of the outlet, or unsafely through you to something else that's earthed like metal ...


6

The first problem is that you may be using the wrong cable and breakers. NEC calls for 2 20Amp small appliance circuits in the kitchen, to accomplish this you'll need to switch to 20Amp breakers and #12 wire. The next problem. You'll have to pull new wire anyway, if you want to hook up GFCI receptacles. GFCI receptacles will not work properly with a shared ...


6

This configuration is a bit odd. The reason why a GFCI outlet has a line and load side is that a single GFCI outlet can offer GFCI protection to any downstream outlets (load). If I were in your situation, I would install a new GFCI outlet in the first location, and then new standard outlets (your region might require tamper-resistant outlets) in all the ...


6

A GFCI is only measuring currents and does not care about the voltages on either of the two wires going through it. As long as the net current is always zero, it really doesn't matter how it is switched on and off. The real problem with a "switched neutral" is that the contacts inside the fixture are live with respect to ground even when the switch is off. ...


5

I have never encountered the situation of a buzzing GFI before. Sounds a bit fishy to me. The trouble shooting procedure would be to turn off the power to the bathroom, unscrew the GFI from the box, pull it out a bit and remove the "load" side wires which should go to the dimmer and check that "line" screws are tight. Turn the power back on, if the dimmer is ...


5

My guess is that it stands for Uniform Fire Code Listed and means that all components in the circuit have been tested to conform to the Uniform Fire Code, i.e. NFPA 1. (I'm extrapolating from a UL or CULUS listing meaning that a product has been tested to the appropriate UL standard.) Since the National Electrical Code is part of the NFPA standards, that ...


5

Found some helpful diagrams here. Wiring Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter Switch With this arrangement a receptacle, switch and disposal are protected with the ground fault breaker built into the device. Wiring Ground Fault Interrupter and Light Switch With this arrangement the receptacle is protected but the switch remains outside ...


5

This is a common misconception when using Ground Fault Circuit Interruption (GFCI) devices. GFCI devices do not require an equipment ground to function, they detect unbalanced loads within the circuit using the "hot" (ungrounded conductor) and the "neutral" (grounded conductor). In a properly functioning circuit, the current on the ungrounded conductor ...


5

A non-contact tester might give you a false-positive on the neutral in some cases. Try testing the outlet with an outlet tester which will indicate if the hot/neutral are switched or open. Alternatively you can use a multi-meter to test it. If you are in the US, you should get ~120VAC between hot and neutral, but 0VAC between neutral and ground if the ...


5

You're going to have to inspect each junction and device in the circuit, starting with the first know bad device. It sounds like you have a GFCI in the house, which feeds a receptacle in the shed, which in turn feeds a switched light in the shed. Since the receptacle in the shed is the first know bad device, you'll want to start there. Turn off the ...


5

I think your question is about safely using your snow blower with a non-GFI protected outlet. As a rule of thumb, any appliance used outdoors should be plugged into a GFI outlet. In your case specifically, I think you will find that your snow blower handles and controls are well insulated electrically from the source voltage and motor. The case is probably ...


5

If you check the electrical department at your local home center you can purchase a portable GFI. It looks like a small extension cord with a box mounted between the plugs. It will protect you while using the snowthrower. It will offer protection while connecting the snow blower to the power cord, however you will not be protected while plugging the portable ...


5

As Paul points out, there are no requirements in the National Electrical Code (NEC) for Ground Fault Circuit Interruption (GFCI) protection on switches. If you understand the purpose of GFCI devices, and think about the differences between switches and other electrical devices you'll see why. What is a ground fault? In a normally functioning 120V single ...


5

Since it's a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) breaker, it's very likely that you have a ground fault. GFCIs work by detecting an imbalance in current between the ungrounded (hot), and grounded (neutral) conductors. This is why you only see the trip when the circuit is under load. If there is 0 current flow, the current is balanced. I'd start by ...



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