Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

You've got the big one covered, turning off the main breaker. Without that, the voltage from the generator goes back out the power lines, into the transformer, where instead of getting stepped down to your house voltage will get stepped up to the line voltage, plus make previously dead wires, live. Given the options, using a dryer style plug for 220v is ...


11

You should hire an electrician to help you with this, since you don't sound qualified to wire up a generator properly. She can help you figure out the right way to do this. However, it's good for you to be well-informed going in to this. So: Generators are rated in several ways: Peak load. Starting a motor (like a pump or fridge compressor) draws a lot of ...


10

I live in southern New England, where we can usually see our natural disasters coming a few days in advance (snowstorms, hurricanes, etc.), so your considerations will be different, but I'll share what I do and what I've learned in three 5+ day outages over the past two years; it may give you some reference points. Fuel reserves I have a gasoline-powered ...


8

NO. What you are describing could potentially kill the folks that are trying to help restore power to your home. You're also creating a situation where you could easily overload your generator. To do this the right way, you'll need to install a transfer switch. Transfer switches allow you to switch between two source of electricity, while mitigating any ...


6

Good and affordable are both relative to many local factors. Your best bet is to look around you and see what fuel source is abundant. You'll also want to think about how often/long that resource is present during high power use periods as you'll need to store the power for later use which can rack up the price. There are areas of Michigan that are some of ...


5

Here are a couple companies that make rooftop wind turbines Swift Wind Turbines. Wind Energy 7. Not sure if these things would require special zoning, permits, etc. or if they would even be allowed in all locations. A call to your local government would be the easiest way to find out if something like this would be permitted in your area. You may also ...


5

I went to test it out again, hoping elves would've fixed it while I was gone, but no such luck. As I was playing with the oil burner, I flicked on/off the emergency shutoff switch and got shocked. This led me to check the ground wires. The transfer station looked ok, so I went outside to check the power inlet. I was cautiously happy when I saw that the ...


4

The load center with the transfer switch (or "critical load panel") should have a circuit for each circuit that was specified to be connected to the generator. The original breakers no longer function because nothing is connected to them now; there is probably one dual-pole breaker feeding the critical load panel, and there should then be a breaker for ...


4

Pulling the plug is quick, easy check if you have the right socket. Should be fairly clean, with a gap. BTW, my Gen has a separate on/off switch, yours? Next up would be some carb cleaner (after pulling air cleaner) Remove and clean carb bowl, float and orifice. Would also drain gas, put in car day after fillup, refill with new gas and treatment Next ...


4

I don't see any way this could be done safely, to code, etc. Problem being there's no way to interlock the MAIN and the Generator if they are on different panels. Without an interlock, it's quite simply not safe (and in a more nuanced view, if the power company becomes aware of it you may not get your power turned back on - they REALLY don't like that.) The ...


3

I had the very same question when I sized my generator to run my well-pump during power outages. I purchased a clamp meter for under $100 and tested the pump on household current. I simply attached the meter to the hot line and then turned on the pump. My pump is 220 volt with two hot wires so I had to multiply the results by 2. Unfortunately, I have ...


3

I received a good answer from the manufacturer. I wanted to post it as an additional answer. Thanks to all for the mention of UL and appliances being separate from general NEC building codes. I've learned a lot from the comments and the other answer (which I've accepted). UL 1008 is the standard these devices meet. Here is the email response. They have ...


3

That does indeed describe a properly engineered 50 amp device. It is normal for appliances to use slightly lighter gauge wire than would be used in building wiring. You can observe that inside electric ranges, dryers, and water heaters, where you will see the 10 or 8 gauge incoming supply wires to a terminal and then 12 or 14 gauge wire going from the ...


3

I’m a proponent of portable generators. I have a gasoline unit though I’ll consider a propane unit when this one finally croaks. Permanent generators are great – if your structure is still standing when the disaster is over. The primary disadvantage of portable generators is they are subject to theft when you need them the most. A couple of fellows ...


3

As has been discussed many times in this forum, back feeding a generator into a double or even a single pole breaker without a transfer switch is risky business. If the main breaker is not disabled while generator is online, you will be back feeding power to the grid and pose a safety hazard to utility workers. With that said, look at the following link, ...


3

Another view on this.... Your cost of power has doubled so the easiest way to offset this would be to reduce your power consumption. Newer CPU's consume significantly less power than CPU's of just a couple years ago. Monitors backlit via a LED are more efficient than monitors backlit via a CFL. SSD's use less power than traditional hard drives. Laptops ...


3

I know this is an old question, but I wanted to mention another option if your main concern is the sump: a Sump Bump Battery Backup System. This is a system with a battery (about the size of a car battery) that charges off your AC power, and when main power goes off, the sump pump can run off of the battery. The model I have says that it can power a sump ...


3

This site seems to have a decent explanation: Some portable generators are intended for use on jobsites, and therefore are subject to OSHA regulations for GFCI protection on all receptacles. These "contractor grade" generators have their neutral wire bonded to the ground wire to pass OSHA inspection on job sites. Since home and building main load ...


2

If you are testing continuity at the generator inlet plug with the transfer switch in the GEN. position, you will be measuring continuity throughout the entire circuit. If you look at this image, you should see why you're getting the readings you are. The light blue box on the left, represents the main service panel. The light blue box on the right, ...


2

As far as the generator goes, it should have a on-auto-off switch on it. Turn it to off, and then it won't kick on. On the matter of a breaker not turning off the power to that circuit, that sounds wrong to me, and I would have them back out to correct that, as that is not a correct installation.


2

I would replace the spark plug and remove the air filter to make sure it isn't plugged up. Then, while the air filter is still removed, spray a little starting fluid into the carb through the hole under the air filter and start it up. If it runs for just a couple seconds and dies, that means the gas in your carb was probably bad. Starting it with the ...


2

According to the Manufacturers Installation Guide (PDF)... Physical - install the UTS within one foot of the building circuit breaker panel Page 4 Caution: The UTS must be installed within one foot of the building circuit breaker panel. If the UTS must be located further than one foot from the circuit breaker panel, a licensed electrician must ...


2

You probably overheated and burned every component in that line, including the wiring and the GCFI outlet. You probably melted/decomposed the insulation on that circuit. The GFCI is tripping because you have significant leakage on the hot or neutral lines, which means they're leaking to either the ground or to some other path within the house. You may have ...


2

Circuit breakers have a maximum current that they're rated for, usually around 10,000 amps for a residential one. You can look it up for your model if you're worried, but it's probably way, way more than your generator is capable of generating. In fact, the circuit breaker is probably the only electrical thing in the whole house that you can pretty well ...


2

You're looking up parts with the wrong terms. What you want is a transfer switch. You don't need the kind that includes breakers, etc., since you're using an interlock; just a simple transfer switch. In a transfer switch where the neutrals are bonded or overlapped during switching, the advantage is reduced arcing and transients during switching. The ...


1

Generator output is dirty. But most electronics take AC power and convert it to DC prior to use. This helps for most applicances. You likely don't have to worry about running the furnace and damaging the controls. I would suggest the traditional generator for the whole house, or portion of the house (circuits), unless you have very delicate electronics.


1

If you already own the generator I say go for it and try it out. If the generator is anywhere decent then it will regulate the voltage more than enough for a motor so you won't over power the motor with voltage. If the generator can't handle it you will not harm the motor unless you are able to stall it for an extended period of time; the generator shouldn't ...


1

It seems the decision is ultimately in the hands of the Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ), as long as "equivalent objectives can be achieved" using the device. National Electrical Code 2008 ARTICLE 100 Definitions Approved. Acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction. Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ). An organization, office, or ...


1

Based on the quote: Temporary connection of a portable generator without transfer equipment shall be permitted where conditions of maintenance and supervision ensure that only qualified persons service the installation and where the normal supply is physically isolated by a lockable disconnecting means or by disconnection of the normal supply conductors. ...


1

You can find all types of power failure alarms online, with a simple search. One such device from Reliance Controls, is the PowerOUT!™ The PowerOUT!™ is a power failure light, power failure alarm and a portable 6-hour LED flashlight. When plugged into a standard 15A, 120V outlet, the PowerOUT!™ will sound an audible alarm and illuminate three ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible