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13

You asked for optimal: Follow a few thousand years of practical experience and put in a tension brace (lower outside corner to top hinge-side corner - opposite what you are going for, which is a compression brace) Go with the past few hundred years and make it a turnbuckle. The best form of compression brace "in plane" is none of the above, and has a point ...


8

Rule of thumb is that 1/3 of the post should be in the ground. A 6' fence should be sunk into the ground 3', so you'd need 9' posts. As Shirlock states, even that won't likely support an 8' wide gate. Two 4' gates would definitely be a better option. Perhaps the easiest solution, however, is to not even make a gate. Instead, build your fence and then make ...


8

An eight foot wide gate is going to be very heavy and most likely will sag and drag on the ground. I would recommend two four foot gates. As far as the foundation for your posts, to support a swing gate, they should be at least 36 to 40 inches in the ground and in at least a 12 inch diameter concrete sauna tube. Frost is not your enemy here, but rot and ...


8

It is possible and should be relatively easy to estimate how much it is expanding based on the coefficient of thermal expansion, the size of the gate and how hot the gate gets. One other issue you might to look at is movement of any posts supporting the gate. If you have had unusually dry weather for instance this may have caused the ground supporting any ...


6

More than likely, the column of blocks has settled slightly causing your problem. I can't see from your picture, but has the gap between the top blocks and wall also opened slightly? If it has, then your blocks have shifted. Usually the weight of a large gate, such as you have, causes this problem on a fairly new install, especially since you only have a one ...


4

Once you have corrected your axis of rotation it should be obvious that the idea to lengthen the "clip" will not change anything with regard to the force required to raise the flap. Actually it could make things worse if the longer clip added more weight to the whole assembly. The force needed to raise the flap is measured in some units like foot-pounds ...


3

Could you attach a board to the wall, that spans the distance between the stud, and your ideal hinge location for the baby gate? For an example of what I'm talking about-- as well as plans for a cool parallelogram baby gate-- see the following: http://woodgears.ca/home/baby_gate.html (Note I am not talking about the gate at the top of the stairs, that ...


3

Use waterproof glue, make the joint tight-fitting, and leave the screws on the shelf. A lap joint is one of the strongest of all the glued wood joints, and a well-fitted glued lap joint will be at least as strong without the screws as with them. But... there's a condition. How wide are the two planks forming that joint? And which wood is being used? I ask ...


3

Wheels help, but wooden gates are VERY HEAVY. I would definitely use 6x6. Free tip: I had a fencing contractor build gates for me last year, and they are already warped because they only did diagonal bracing in one direction. Be sure to do an "X" configuration with the bracing.


3

The rule of thumb I know that applies here tells me to use at least 6"x6" posts for wide gates concreted into a 3ft deep hole. By preference I'd go for a single larger post and go deeper than you suggest. You might get away with firmly bolting the two posts together, but I would be wary about compromising on the depth...


3

Basically, what you want is a UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply); it's a combination surge protector and battery backup. These are usually spec'ed for computer systems (server rooms, uptime-critical workstations like for call centers, etc) but as long as you keep the actual unit inside some weatherproof area like a garage, it should be just fine for powering ...


3

To me, it looks like you have a very old Zinc coated gate, which has many areas which have been touched up with a grey paint (I may be completely wrong).. Typically the galvanization is done when the clean metal fence is dipped into molten zinc and effectively coated in a corrosive resistant zinc shell. if you would like to return the fence to original ...


2

Your best bet when setting out to paint the metal gate is to completely remove all of the rust and corrosion down to clean surface metal. Attempting to paint over this will both look bad and will fail very soon. The ongoing chemical reactions with the metal create a surface that is unstable and will eventually break right through any paint that you try to ...


2

"tends to rain" :) Wood will shrink and swell. You can't stop it. Rather, allow for it. You can use wood naturally resistant to decay. Not sure what's available in your locale, examples include redwood, cedar, teak, cypress. You can also use pressure treated lumber, in which case, be sure to apply preservative to cut ends. Field applied preservative will ...


2

In an attempt to answer some of the questions raised in your posting let me respond in answer format. 1) It can be advantageous in some situations to affix a timber post to the brick or concrete posts/walls in either side of the gate opening. This post can then serve as a better medium into which to attach hinges and latches. 2) A 3.8 meter wide gate ...


2

The post should be 4 feet high above ground and deep enough to be set into concrete below the frost line. A 4' hole (8' post) should be more than sufficient. Probably overkill, in fact, but wouldn't go any less than 6' total, 2' below grade, and if you're in the north, definitely go deeper.


2

You could try removing the cap and bolt the column of blocks to the house, at an angle obviously with an adequately long lag screw. Also, run adhesive along and into the separation on both sides. I'm having the opposite problem myself. On the hinge side, the entire column has separated from the row of blocks.


2

The column of blocks has most likely cracked away from the concrete footing. The solution is to knock the top cap off of the column and fill the column with concrete. Brace the column square and vertically. Then mix concrete to a pourable mix (but not too watery or it will not set right) then fill. Allow the column to fully set before removing the braces ...


2

@Michael's answer explained how to do the numbers. (I only add that the force required acts as a cosine, the torque required is greatest when you start lifting until it drops to 0 when the plate is vertical) I will explain how to reduce the force required; If you add a 12:1 reduction gear then the torque required will be 1/12 of what you need without the ...


1

Square tube (or I-beam) is a trifle stronger than C-channel/C-beam. You may not need that additional strength, depending on exactly what you're building. C-channel is a bit lighter, which may not matter for your application. (I'm using square-tube aluminum for the bike trailer I'm modifying. C-channel would probably have been fine for this application, but ...


1

There are safety gates made specifically for this configuration. See, for example, this one on amazon: Regalo Top of Stair Gate, White by Regalo http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003VNKLI4/ref=cm_sw_r_udp_awd_AUjItb1Q0882Z I'm not endorsing it or recommending this particular one ... Just pointing out that there's a product line designed to meet this need.


1

At my house we had some very heavy gates made up by a professional builder and we didn't want it to move. The frame was made of galvanised steel and it was covered with heavy kwila riveted to the the steel frame. So far so good. However another gate made of pine for the back of the house by the same builder started off perfect, but winter weather has ...


1

I am in the process of building a picket fence (picket by picket). I made 8 inch holes and used 4"x4"x6' posts for my 4' fence. The upper back railing is a about 38" off the ground. So around 2 feet of the post is in the ground for every post. Corner posts are 8' posts and cemented into place. The tops were trimmed to the top railing to be flush. Also the 8' ...


1

Assuming that they are round metal poles that are generally used for chainlink, the 'corner' poles are what you generally use for a gate. You pretty much use corner poles anytime you terminate a run of any kind, and a gate opening is a termination. The actual gauge isn't going to matter so much as the diameter of the pole, you need to make sure your gate ...



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