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8

Rule of thumb is that 1/3 of the post should be in the ground. A 6' fence should be sunk into the ground 3', so you'd need 9' posts. As Shirlock states, even that won't likely support an 8' wide gate. Two 4' gates would definitely be a better option. Perhaps the easiest solution, however, is to not even make a gate. Instead, build your fence and then make ...


8

An eight foot wide gate is going to be very heavy and most likely will sag and drag on the ground. I would recommend two four foot gates. As far as the foundation for your posts, to support a swing gate, they should be at least 36 to 40 inches in the ground and in at least a 12 inch diameter concrete sauna tube. Frost is not your enemy here, but rot and ...


6

More than likely, the column of blocks has settled slightly causing your problem. I can't see from your picture, but has the gap between the top blocks and wall also opened slightly? If it has, then your blocks have shifted. Usually the weight of a large gate, such as you have, causes this problem on a fairly new install, especially since you only have a one ...


6

My first thought is a guy wire from the top corner of the post, with a turnbuckle in the middle to tension it up and pull out that lean in the post. It seems that if you don't do something like this, the only alternative IS to reset the posts, which is a lot of work. Hope this helps. This is what a turnbuckle looks like:


3

Wheels help, but wooden gates are VERY HEAVY. I would definitely use 6x6. Free tip: I had a fencing contractor build gates for me last year, and they are already warped because they only did diagonal bracing in one direction. Be sure to do an "X" configuration with the bracing.


3

The rule of thumb I know that applies here tells me to use at least 6"x6" posts for wide gates concreted into a 3ft deep hole. By preference I'd go for a single larger post and go deeper than you suggest. You might get away with firmly bolting the two posts together, but I would be wary about compromising on the depth...


2

The post should be 4 feet high above ground and deep enough to be set into concrete below the frost line. A 4' hole (8' post) should be more than sufficient. Probably overkill, in fact, but wouldn't go any less than 6' total, 2' below grade, and if you're in the north, definitely go deeper.


2

I don't know where you would buy it but it would be really easy to pour it. Just build a box the size you want the post to be. You could put any kind of medallion or symbol at the top of it. Pour the appropriate amount of concrete in (probably 2 bags?) Then run a vibrating sander over the outside of the form or box in order to get any air bubbles out. ...


2

You could try removing the cap and bolt the column of blocks to the house, at an angle obviously with an adequately long lag screw. Also, run adhesive along and into the separation on both sides. I'm having the opposite problem myself. On the hinge side, the entire column has separated from the row of blocks.


2

The column of blocks has most likely cracked away from the concrete footing. The solution is to knock the top cap off of the column and fill the column with concrete. Brace the column square and vertically. Then mix concrete to a pourable mix (but not too watery or it will not set right) then fill. Allow the column to fully set before removing the braces ...


1

The posts for your gate should be embedded in a good concrete base 2 to 3 feet deep. If the gate posts are going to be inside the edges of your walk, then I would install them first. It goes without saying that you should use PT posts and be sure the top of the concrete around the post bevels slightly away from the post so water will run away and not pond ...


1

The really professional way is to set a bracket in concrete, then bolt-through the posts to the brackets. While slightly more $ (cost of bracket and bolt) and more effort, this will give you a long life solution that is easy to maintain over time. The concrete for the bracket should be 24-30" deep, 8" diameter for posts of this size. Setting the post in ...


1

Depending on where you live may change the answer slightly. For instance, I live in the Seattle area, and an 8" cedar post is used frequently. It's usually quite wet up here, so metal posts often rust, especially if they're not cared for. The other plus for a wood post is that it looks better (in my opinion). Downside of a wood post is potential warping. ...


1

Assuming that they are round metal poles that are generally used for chainlink, the 'corner' poles are what you generally use for a gate. You pretty much use corner poles anytime you terminate a run of any kind, and a gate opening is a termination. The actual gauge isn't going to matter so much as the diameter of the pole, you need to make sure your gate ...


1

Why not stick a 1/4" shim behind the gate's lower hinge? Or planing off 1/4" behind the upper hinge?



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