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21

You should be able to tell by the color, and connections used. Gas "Black pipe" is commonly used for natural gas, and is dark grey/black. All connections will be threaded. Water Water lines come in a variety of materials, some of the most common are. Copper This will be um... copper, in color. While there are other ways to join copper pipes, ...


15

Why not just use a ball valve? These valves make it easy to tell if they are open or closed. In the open position (gas is flowing) the handle (lever) will be parallel with the pipe, when it is closed (gas not flowing) the handle (lever) will be perpendicular to the pipe. This should make it easy for you to tell if the gas is on, or off.


13

I would say that this is highly dangerous. It is against US and Canadian code to not have outside ventilation for any fuel-burning appliance in your home; that's your furnace, HWH and stove/oven, assuming all are NG or propane. It is only acceptable to have a "filter-only" vent hood for your stove if it's all-electric (which BTW is the case for every single ...


12

This is quite possibly an emergency. Call your gas utility company and have them come check it out immediately. Also, open some windows to draw fresh air into your home, if you have a gas or exhaust leak it can be a fire and suffocation hazard.


11

There's two issues here. The first is the CO alarm. SOMETHING is wrong. It may be the stove, or some other combustion device in your house, but it's definitely something to pay attention to. I'd suggest getting a second CO detector and place it around the house and monitor the levels carefully. If it's the stove, it's less of a ventilation issue and more of ...


11

Gas leak A gas leak could be deadly not only due to inhalation, but also as an explosion hazard. Carbon Monoxide Carbon monoxide is an silent killer. It's colorless, odorless, tasteless, and can kill you before you know you're dead. Combustion Air If the home is sealed tightly, and a source of makeup air is not present (for example if the source is ...


10

I suspect you actually have two questions: 1) Does it meet current code, and 2) Do I have to do something about it. My understanding is that in most places you can't do anything new with lead gas pipe, BUT there's no obligation to upgrade old service as long as it's working OK. My understanding is that most places won't even let you replace lead pipe ...


8

My first guess would be the thermocouple is bad, or going bad. The thermocouple is a small device that generates electricity from heat, they are used in gas furnaces and such to shut off the gas in case the pilot goes out (so gas doesn't continue to flow and fill the room). I admit I'm no expert when it comes to gas fire places, but I had an old gas heater ...


8

It sure sounds to me like a problem with the gas pressure or regulator/meter. Since gas can be dangerous if leaking into your house if a pilot blows out etc, I'd be on the phone to the gas supplier. They should be able to check the input pressure and assure that the regulator is working properly. Trying to trouble shoot and repair this type of problem is not ...


8

The concern that I know of is about the size of the pipe and all appliances that can be running at the other end. So if they ran out of a larger dimension pipe (or just had a lot of the smaller dimension) this would almost make sense. But I'd think any normal installer would try to minimize the parts cost and split it closer to the appliances. However, if ...


8

Some of the more advanced thermostats will track how often they are running. I have a Filtrete Wifi-Enabled Progammable Thermostat. It gives you a per-day total of how often the heat and A/C are run. You can also download an hour-by-hour export of the usage in CSV format. I am in no way affiliated with this company. It is simply a product I have ...


8

There are two types of tubing most people think of, when you say "flexible gas tubing". The first and more common, are flexible gas connectors. These guys are typically 3-6' long, and are used to connect appliances to the gas piping. They are only to be used as a short link between the fixed piping and the appliance, and so are considered a "connector" ...


7

Do you have the manual for the thing? I've done a little poking around (I even found a bunch of parts diagrams at Sears website), and I'm getting the impression that it's got a spark ignition system, not a pilot. Is the range plugged in? Is there any chance that the circuit it's on has tripped it's breaker? I've got a cooktop with a spark ignition system, ...


6

The advice your home inspector gave you is ridiculous and he should have his license revoked. Either a flue is safe to use with wood, or it is not. Get a good chimney cleaning company that also inspects flues to clean it well first and run a camera down the length looking for any problems that might need attention and assure you it is safe for a wood fire. ...


6

Have a look at the 2006 International Residential Code. Here are a few sections that may apply. Chapter 15 - Exhaust Systems SECTION M1501 GENERAL M1501.1 Outdoor discharge. The air removed by every mechanical exhaust system shall be discharged to the outdoors. Air shall not be exhausted into an attic, soffit, ridge vent or crawl ...


6

No. The rust is inconsequential and those pipes will likely outlive the gas meter equipment itself. The reason that the rust is at the threads is because the threads are not painted well on purpose; it prevents a good seal when they're putting the gas meter together. Depending on your gas company's policies, painting the gas meter could be a violation of ...


6

Your question concerns me. I'm a general contractor and have had many new heating systems installed for customers and have NEVER had this complaint from anyone. As a matter of fact, I just had a complete change over from oil to natural gas done at my private home two weeks ago. I have never smelled any residue from cutting oil used to thread pipe. My sub ...


6

Get the 220v outlet while you can. With that wiring, you can run two 110v circuits in the future or install an electric oven if you change your mind. Running another line in the future would be much more difficult, so now is the time to have it installed. The only change you'll likely have to make is replacing the double breaker with two single breakers if ...


5

It's got to do with the volume of gas delivered to each appliance. The gas coming into your home is at some standard pressure, through a large-diameter pipe (2 inch or so diameter, perhaps). That means that some particular volume of gas can come into your home per second. Each appliance has a certain volume of gas per second that it needs to operate, but it ...


5

In rural locations in the US, propane is often used as a fuel for cooking and heating. The gas is stored in an outdoor tank and piped into the house. Propane burns hotter than methane ("natural gas"). Therefore you may need a special stove to use propane, and if you want to hook up appliances such as a water heater or clothes dryer, you will definitely need ...


5

Most furnaces have an AC component that is powered on when it is running. Put a ac clock in parallel with this. For up to 12 hr this will tell you the time the device is running. Other types of timers will go for longer. Most furnaces run at two speeds stop and full.


5

As Tester101 mentioned, a flexible hose is not suitable for concealing in the wall. Similar to plumbing that is in the way, the pipe needs to be re-routed and moved. Depending on your location, this might be something that is permitted by the home owner or it might require a licensed technician to complete. Unlike water where a small leak is unlikely to ...


5

Water heaters have a dip tube on the cold water side that puts the cold water into the bottom of the tank. If water pressure is lost on the cold water side, the tank can siphon down through the cold water inlet till it reaches the bottom of the dip tube. Then since there's no water in the tank to absorb heat, the dip tube can melt and the tank can be ...


4

Can you look at the furnace during the time it is blowing cold air and see if the flame is on? The thermostat has the ability to control the fan, but typically the thermostat sends a "turn heat on" signal to the furnace and the furnace controls are setup to turn the flame on for a X amount of time (to warm up the air) and then turn on the fan once the timer ...


4

In the UK, it's not legal (quite correctly, in my view) for householders to work on gas pipework or fittings at all. If a buildings inspector or surveyor spots pushfit fittings on gas you can expect plenty of trouble down the line... to say nothing of the risk of a pinhole leak or if there's another fire nearby that melts the fitting. While you might save ...


4

look at page 22 of the manual: http://www.heatilator.com/downloads/installManuals/4031-551.pdf using a multimeter, check the voltage being sent to the valve while the fireplace is on, which should be the green and orange wires. the re-check it after you turn it off and the pilot is still on. if the on and off voltages are different, then your gas valve is ...


4

I don't think it's as dire as all the comments are making it out to be. Some people are just afraid of gas, just like some people are afraid of anything involving electricity. If you think it's just a loose coupling, you can turn the gas off, unscrew the coupling, apply pipe dope (not tape) and re-attach the coupling and turn the gas back on. If it still ...


4

Your flue should always be open when the fireplace is operating. It is a fire and smoke risk to close the flue while the fire is lit. When not burning, the flue should be closed to prevent heat loss.


4

On the other side of the wall is a large closet with the air conditioning system, water heater, and what I think is the gas shutoff valve. What do the pipes connect to inside that closet? Trace from where the pipes penetrate the wall back. Do they connect to the water heater or other water pipes? Compare the pipes coming out of your water heater (at ...


4

Corrugated pipe is generally intended only to be used as the last connection to an appliance, in a living space where it not vulnerable to banging or jostling (usually behind or in a space at the bottom of an appliance), but where it can be seen and accessed if work is being done. It is not intended to be buried in a wall, where it could be pierced by a ...



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