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30

There is a very simple answer to your question. Your dishwasher is draining into the side drain adapter on your garbage disposer. this was a common practice for many years. All the water draining from your dishwasher is being pumped into the upper basin side of the disposer. Solids from the dishwasher are blocking the drain in the disposer, so when you turn ...


15

The easy way: remove the large shards with tongs. If you're having a hard time, cut up an old kitchen sponge, make sure it's soft (moist) and put it in the tongs as a bait for all the glass shards. They'll stick in the sponge just like they would your hand. Then, just hope that the small pieces will go down the drain with time. The hard way: unhook the ...


14

disposals usually come with a small hex wrench that fits in to the bottom of disposal. This lets you move the shaft of the motor back and forth to loosen up whatever it stopping it. If you can't find yours, you can pick one up at a hardware store or plumbing supply shop.


10

This might be of interest. Air gap Many local building codes require a dishwasher to connect to an air gap before the connection to a garbage disposer. This keeps wastewater from backing up into the appliance. You must purchase the air gap separately. Mount in on top or next to the sink. Connect one flexible hose to the drain of the ...


9

The tong approach is good, and it is safe. Don't try with your hands. Ball up some duct tape with sticky side out and dob it around the bottom of the disposer. The smaller pieces will work themselves out with time. Putting some bread or other porous sticky organic material in there and running it will help gather the shards and pass them. Go easy on the ...


8

Yes, you'll need a 20 Amp 120V outlet with just the disposal on it. I don't see why you shouldn't be able to wire it up yourself. Something else to think about - is your house on a septic tank or a sewer system? Some city regulations don't allow a garbage disposal on a septic tank. Ours is kind of kludged with the switch under the sink because it was an ...


8

I personally wouldn't do it. Even if you could find a suitable hatch, you'd need a good way to clean it out regularly. When I lived in an apartment complex with a hatch, it was foul; it was bad enough that they'd spray for bugs every 3-4 months, and in the process, drive the bugs into other apartments (and mine was right next to the chute ... so make sure, ...


8

My guess is one of two things: 1) Damaged splash guard (the rubber flap pieces that hang from the drain) 2) Some object, or some mass of shredded food/etc, has become lodged in the disposal so when it's spinning, things hit and just get shot upward. Both could be a long shot, but it's worth checking in to both for sure.


7

A GFCI is a good idea because of the location of the outlet. However, I don't think that a GFCI that can simultaneously protect two circuits even exists (and I doubt one would fit into a single-gang box if it did exist), so I believe you have a couple of options: Install GFCI breakers on the dishwasher and disposal circuits, and use a regular outlet under ...


7

I've used a warmed, peeled potato with good effect to pick up glass. Also if you can get a wet/dry shop vac in there you can attempt to use that to bring the pieces out.


7

The manual for the garbage disposal I just installed says to use cold water because hot water could cause the motor to overheat.


6

Well, I have to admit I am not a Garbage Disposal Expert, but if the key turns freely and it is tripping the breaker, then I would think it is time to go shopping. Is it easy to install? That's pretty subjective and depends on your skills. But, in general, they are not difficult for someone who is use to doing DYI stuff around the house, especially if you ...


6

This project is fairly straight forward. You need to completely disassemble both sides including the in sink trims. You will need an adjustable wrench, a large pair of pump pliers or monkey wrench, screwdriver, nothing special. Be sure the electrical wire will reach the new disposal location, it not, you will need a j-box and some wire, you will also need ...


6

If you want to have power always on to a box that is downstream of a switch, you'll need to use 3-conductor cable between the switch and split the hot side of the outlet. At the outlet, break off the tab on the hot side only between the top and bottom outlet. Wire the red conductor to one of the hot screws, the black conductor to the other one, and then ...


6

Sounds like the drain after the disposal and connection to the other sink is partially blocked. I'd start with a drain cleaner that's designed for a partial blockage. In the kitchen, it's likely a buildup from cooking oils and grease that got into the drain. If that doesn't work, then you can remove the trap under your sink and remove as much crud from it as ...


6

Sounds like the chewed up gunk from the disposal has largely blocked the drain pipe. Try a plunger first (block all other connected drains) but that may or may not be effective depending on how far along the clog is. If the simple solution doesn't work, you'll have to open a clean-out (or the U-trap) and use an auger to break it out. You can rent a ...


6

Assuming that food waste disposers will include more grease going down the drain due to the variety of items being disposed, I've been told that cold water helps coagulate grease into chunks that wash down the drain. Somehow this helps reduce grease buildup in the trap. I would suspect that cold+liquid grease at the disposal gets broken up without gumming up ...


5

It could also be caused by a partially blocked drain pipe.


5

A garage will frequently have fire rated drywall, a vapor barrier, and insulation. The fire rated drywall prevents fires in the garage from roasting your home before the fire dept can get there (1 hour). The vapor barrier prevents exhaust fumes (CO) from getting into your home from any cars. And the insulation is because the garage is an unheated space. I'm ...


5

The receptacle that the disposal is plugged into is fed from the Load side of the GFCI receptacle, thereby providing ground fault protection to the receptacle. There is a ground fault somewhere between the GFCI and the disposal, which is causing the GFCI to do it's job and trip. You'll have to locate the fault, and fix it. If you don't have (or know how to ...


5

It is obvious to me that the main sewer line is restricted somewhere between the house and town line. In areas that allow storm drains to be coupled to sewer lines, it is important that these lines run freely. If yours is backing up with kitchen waste, there is only one solution. You need to have the line checked with a camera. you could have a simple ...


5

Dishwashers can be either hardwired, or cord-and-plug connected. Check the owners manual of the unit you have, but in most cases the decision is left to the installer. From a random Maytag Dishwasher Installation Guide (PDF) In newer homes you'll commonly find a 125V NEMA 5-15R receptacle supplied by a 20 ampere circuit, used to supply a dishwasher ...


4

You probably have one of two possible problems. 1) The disposer may be jammed. Check this by making sure the switch is OFF and the breaker is OFF. Insert the proper hex wrench into the bottom hex socket (center bottom of unit) and rotate it left and right to be sure it turns free and easy. If jammed, it may take a bit of forceful back and forth action to ...


4

As others have pointed out, the diswasher drain line probably connects to the top of the disposal. The diswasher drain line will dump dirty water and food particles into the top of your disposal. Do you run the disposal prior to starting the dishwasher? If you have crap built up in your disposal, that can be contributing to a backup. The manual for my ...


4

Pretty good advice so far. If it were a new install, then it would not be "J" boxed under the sink, but direct to the switch and GFI protected. But with the situation you have now, unless you want to fish wires up the wall to the switch, let's make it safe. Install a tamper proof GFI receptacle into the box as pictured and install a gasketed cover. ...


4

If you don't have the GFCI tester that KeithS mentioned, they are cheap and good to have. But until then, just hit the test button on the GFCI outlet in the kitchen and see what turns off. As far as wiring coming straight out of the box like that, I suspect it's against code. Every wire should go through a knockout in the back of the outlet in a secure ...


4

The answer to your question depends completely on whether this node in the circuit is GFCI-protected. GFCI protection is an absolute must for your disposer; it's a high-amperage electric motor hooked up to your kitchen drain. Since this J-box doesn't have a standard 3-prong outlet, you'll need to find another outlet on the same circuit; look for a ...


4

I only have 2005 NEC handy, but there's nothing there against using same circuit for both dishwasher and disposal. 210.23(A) Branch circuits, rated 20 or 15 amperes may feed lighting units, utilization equipment or combination of both. The rating of of any one cord and plug connected utilization equipment shall not exceed 80% of the branch circuit ampere ...


4

Your new disposal should be connected to a switched GFCI outlet. Verify that the outlet is not tripped. Using an outlet tester, verify that the switch properly powers the electrical socket. Many disposals have an integrated breaker. Locate this switch and verify that the disposal itself has not tripped. You could also try plugging the disposal into an ...



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