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2

Particularly if you have an oversized boiler already, extending the hot water makes more sense. It's not terribly difficult to insulate it properly - especially for a mere 10 or 15 feet. Use 1" PEX and build an XPS (waterproof styrofoam insulation sheets) box, keeping the lines (supply and return) separated with insulation, polyurethane foam it to fill and ...


2

Your panel is a 12/24, so every space can have a tandem or even quad breaker. That's what 12 space, 24 circuit means. In the panel schedule you may even see a line or dotted line through the middle of each breaker space. A single 20A breaker can certainly have all that on it, but the question is should it? It all depends on what you will be running ...


0

Have you considered adding a drain and rigid metal drain pan to the water heater in its current location. That's likely to be a much saner approach? To move an electric water heater, the new location needs the following: 220v outlet on its own circuit with heavy-gauge wiring rated for an electric water heater. This is doable. If there isn't already such a ...


1

There are a lot of questions to ask before an answer can be given: What climate are you in? Is the garage heated or insulated? Is the hot water heater gas, electric, oil, solar, nuclear, gerbil-powered? Are going to do this yourself? You can probably get some pretty good, free advice on this by calling one or two plumbers to come out and give you a quote ...


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My solution was to grind the high side down with a diamond wheel on an angle grinder until the surface was reasonably level, apply an epoxy filler, and cover the floor with an epoxy chip floor that will cover any further imperfections.


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I would say that you'll be okay with a 4" screws and a shims through the top shelf. 3 sets one on each end and a set in the middle should prevent your shelf from falling over. The top is where you'll get the most pulling force so if you screw the shelf up there you'll end up stopping it before it gains any gravitational force as it falls. Lag bolts will ...


1

I'd go two screws per wall stud thru the top and middle shelf. The weight of the thing is supported by the structure itself so all you need to do is keep it from falling over. Use a 4 1/2 inch timber tech or a 5/16 lag with a washer and you'll have two inches of screw into the stud which is adequate but a minimum. Make sure you install shims or a spacer to ...


4

I assume you are in the USA. The heater is probably a pure 240V load with no need for the neutral (white) wire. you should simply cap the white wire with a wire nut and tuck it back into the electrical box.


1

Depends on how much load the rest of the house is putting on the service at the same time... but if the total demand stays under what your service is rated for, and you use wiring that can handle the 50A demand, you theoretically should be OK. Run the numbers. (My electric drier plugs into a 220V outlet fed by a pair of 30A breakers, and I have only 100A ...


0

This question really begs to have the analysis done by a structural engineer. That being said I can venture to suggest two ideas that may be suitable to your situation. A) Probably the best way to provide adequate support for the drywall on the ceiling would be to screw flat 2x4's at right angles to the existing rafters onto the bottom of the lower rafter ...


4

The easiest is to get an extension cord for the low voltage cable on the AC adapter. Most likely the adapter comes equipped with a 2.1mm or 2.5mm center pin barrel type power plug. Extension cords for these are readily available. One would look like this: The extension cable would allow you to power the router from within the same room from an electrical ...



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