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6

Unless you know how to unload the tension on the torsion spring, this is not safe for you to do yourself. There are plenty of videos on the internet that show you how to do it, but be aware that the consequences ofusing the wrong tools or doing it wrong will likely result in serious injury, such as broken bones or amputated limbs, or death. You should ...


5

Metro does not seem to sell an appropriate foot leveler. But a common carriage bolt will fit just fine. The rounded head compensates for the slope far better than the flat factory foot, and you can file the raised numbers off easily: Or find a 3/8" 16 pitch "Combination Leg Equalizer" such as the Rockler #24315, which will spread the load more evenly: ...


4

Depends on overall design and load, and, in terms of screw/nails, it depends on what will be anchored to what. A floor plan annotated with fastener locations would help. If you are notching in order to transfer load to the 4x4, a 1/2" deep notch is all that is necessary. Notching will take shear stresses off the associated screws/nails/bolts. EDIT: Great ...


4

You're looking for Duct Wrap. It's actually an insulation in it's own right, being one side foil, and the other side fiber insulation. I see no reason why you couldn't apply it over top of the existing insulation, provided everything is dry. http://www.homedepot.ca/product/reflectix-duct-wrap-12x25/902353


4

You'll need to check your local codes. In the US, most building code sections begin with a list of definitions, and I assume it's the same elsewhere. If the difference between a shed and a garage is legally significant then they probably define it. It could be based on size, intended use, access to utilities, proximity to other buildings, access to a ...


3

Yep, the 120 year old houses do make life more interesting (and expensive and/or colder.) Use an air barrier that is NOT a vapor barrier. More commonly known as housewrap. Vapor moves through, but bulk air movement is reduced. For insulating inside the floor joists, either blown-in cellulose (which supposedly has very little issue with vapor, due to having ...


3

My answer is almost always the same when talking about garage subpanels. 60 ampere double pole breaker in the main panel. 6 AWG copper wire (x4) for a run less than 75ft., 4 AWG copper wire (x4) for runs less than 150ft. 60 ampere subpanel with 60 ampere main breaker. Unless you're running a whole bunch of stuff at once, a 60 amp panel should serve you ...


3

if you really only need to be able to operate this from inside the garage door, a simple sliding lock may fit the bill. they install on the door and the bar slides into a hole on the garage door track.


3

I would insulate it and drywall it. You are already losing some heat from the house walls and the second floor into the garage. If you insulate it, your garage will be warmer - at least, after the door has been closed for a while - and you will lose less heat. It won't be super-warm, but it will help. You do not need 5/8" drywall for the garage walls. In ...


3

I would not waste the insulation on an outside wall unless your garage door was getting insulation. Drywalling has benefits though... First you need to use fire resistant (5/8) in most places in the US for garages, a fully drywalled and painted garage will be deemed nicer by those wanting to give you money for your house, white flat walls reflect light the ...


3

I love that you're putting a subpanel in your garage. When you go to buy wire, check the price of aluminum. Last time I did this, I went looking for #8 copper, and got #2 aluminum at 1/2 the price. That was a bundle of 2-2-2-4 SER (service entrance) rated for direct burial, but I put it in conduit anyway. Your finding that #3 copper will carry 100A looks ...


2

Step one would be to check with your local inspection authority. Gas work by non-licensed professionals is prohibited in many jurisdictions. If it's not prohibited, they may offer advice on material and installation requirements. You can also talk to the employees at a local gas supply store. A good option for your project would be a direct burial flexible ...


2

I built some garage shelving like the second drawing (without notches) some time back. I used 2x4 instead of 4x4. I screwed 2x4 rails to it. Honestly, it was very strong shelving. I put some very heavy loads on it in excess of 250kg. I do think notching it would make it effectively like a 2x2 in the notched sections and reduce it's strength in the ...


2

If you have an older style garage door remote, before they used rolling codes, you could very easily have some people driving by activating it accidentally. I had a similar problem, so I ended up unplugging the remote control portion of it, so the wall mount switch still works, and the whole unit is going to be replaced soon anyways (electric eye sensor, ...


2

If the lock is separate from the handle and turns freely, my guess is the handle is the issue, not the lock. Overhead garage doors almost always latch by extending pins through the tracks on either side of the door. It is likely that one of these just got bound due to expansion, contraction, ice lifting, or whatnot. I'd try a couple things before doing ...


2

The professional service you need is that of a structural engineer, in combination with a contractor or builder. Each professional has a contribution to make and can enhance the work of the other. Internet advice does not suffice for altering structural members in a home. You can get general advice on feasibility by posting photos annotated with ...


2

It sounds like the chain might not be on the sprocket that drives it. Get up on a ladder and look at the top of the unit. You should be able to easily see if the chain is off the sprocket. Try running the opener while you are up there too. If the chain has come off you will need to loosen the chain tension, place the chain back over the sprocket and ...


2

As recommended by wallyk and yurly, add another circuit or two. There is usually no way to tell exactly how may outlet and switches etc., are on the same circuit. If there is no spare breakers in the breaker panel, use tandem breakers. This will allow two circuits to reside in the same space as one. There are tandem breakers available by all manufacturers, ...


1

You're basically asking how to build a free-standing deck. According to this calculator, you need 2x12 joists on 12 inch centers. If you don't already have one, I suggest buying a deck building book from the hardware store. It will tell you exactly what you need to know.


1

Or: A completely different approach to the problem. If the compressor is really the only thing driving you to want more power in the garage, and the electrical service in the garage, as it stands, would suit your needs adequately otherwise...move the compressor. Build it a "doghouse" in the yard where you can run a dedicated (and shorter) electrical line ...


1

tl;dr - if you are going to all the work, and a subpanel, you presumably want a bit more than 20 amps (think it needs to be 30 amps minimum for code these days, and 60 amps is probably better.) You'll have to dig a ditch. At that point, my opinionated opinion is that you should go ahead and put in conduit, and an additional conduit for any current or future ...


1

Your garage drain could go anywhere--it could be tied into your septic system or sewer connection, or it could go to a separate exterior drywell or leach field. It could even head into a sump pit to be pumped out by a sump pump. Its impossible to know without a whole lot more information about your specific circumstance. As to how to unclog it, your best ...


1

Yes, use pressure treated wood. There would often be anchor bolts cast into the wall to hold the 2x6s, these can be reused. Sometimes powder actuated fasteners are used. Besides needing a special tool to install these, they often do not penetrate well into old, well cured concrete. You can install new expansion anchors by drilling holes with a hammer drill. ...


1

Most likely you want to use window glaze more then caulking. eHow has an 'ok' article on the differences, but is lacking some better detail. However, there was a similar question on yesterdays contractor.com and the answer from Billy NY is excellent. He covers the main reason to use glazing over caulking in certain situations, primarily when mixing ...


1

I have three Genie garage door openers. Two years after installation one started opening and closing on its own. I took the batteries out of the transmitters, shut off the switch on the door button, and reprogrammed the open/close limits. Nothing worked. When checking the door button/wiring for a short, I found that one wire from the wall button connected ...


1

My own (not) special blend of herbs and spices. Specifically, 1.5 cups warm-to-hot water (warm water mixes better) .5 cups sugar 1.5 tablespoons 20 Mule Team Borax Mix vigorusly. The method of delivery I used was soaking a cotton ball in the mixture and placing the cotton ball on juice bottle top or something similar, and placing this in (a) strategic ...


1

Just do it!! Don't let the neigh-sayers ruin it. It can be a fun little project. Use a tilting door built into the wall of the kitchen or to replace a cabinet, use a spring loaded hinge so that it closes by itself (it could look like a normal cabinet door). Use a sufficiently large aluminum duct (like for HVAC) to act as the cute and position a bottomless ...


1

When you say ventilation windows, do you mean operable glazed windows or small permanently open screened openings? Either way, fuel burning appliances require adequate free openings in enclosures to ensure proper exhausting of combustion by-products. Electric water heaters do not require such openings. Your local building authority probably has specific ...



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