Hot answers tagged

12

Looks badly done - grass should have been removed before paving, grade fixed if needed so water won't run from driveway into garage. For a crude fix, place a slot drain right up against the garage to divert water, and infill with lots of "cold patch" to make the slope inbetween as smooth as possible, rather than this huge drop at the end of the pavement. ...


8

Wrap the edges of the tarp around a 1x2 and then screw through the 1x2 and into the garage frame. The more times you can wrap, the better. EDIT - just saw the last photo. You could screw a 1x2 against the side of the stud that the tarp is currently wrapping around.


8

If the canoe is getting in the way, can you not put a second pulley wheel with the cord over it off to the side so you can pull the cord from the ground? Then you can just use a standard cleat.


7

Anything with sensitive electronics is more susceptible to damage due to power surges. Receptacles don't have any electronics (unless they're GFCI or AFCI receptacles), and it's doubtful that a shop light has any either. If a surge is not large enough to trip the magnetic protection, or long enough to trip the thermal protection, then the breaker will not ...


5

Use a jam cleat or a cam cleat mounted to to the wall. Or you could use the horn cleat that came with the prior system. You wrap the rope around the cleat in a figure 8 pattern, and then tie it off. Alternatively (and this works specifically for canoes), you can put loop of nylon webbing on the ceiling with wire around the top to spread it open, and a ...


4

There's a few ways to do this, though service conductors cannot pass through another building, so all the methods will have to avoid that. One option would be to install a service disconnect, and then branch from that to the panels. With this method, you'll handle all the grounding and bonding of the neutral in the disconnect. So you'll install 4 wire ...


4

Rust is only really a concern if there is water or very high humidity. Temperature doesn't have anything to do with it. In fact the Northeast gets quite dry during the winter so you should have no problems (assuming the garage does not leak). Proper care of your tools will help prevent rust. E.g. for hand tools you can give them a quick wipe with tool oil ...


4

Consider a subfloor system like DriCore. These types of systems combine a subfloor base with a water barrier that has channels underneath to allow small amounts of moisture to drain or evaporate. Images and links for illustration only, not an endorsement of goods or sources.


4

The answer is fairly obvious to me. For one thing, 55 parts per million isn't "high". When cold engines first start, they run rich," Greiner said. The catalytic converter is cold and not converting deadly carbon monoxide (CO) to carbon dioxide (CO2). Concentrations in the exhaust can be more than 80,000 parts per million. Concentrations so large fill ...


3

The sensors are needed because automatic garage doors without them (or with malfunctioning ones) can and do kill people, including children. If your current opener has no photo-beam sensor, you should toss a 2x4 on the flat side on the floor and close the door - if it does not stop and reverse by itself when it hits the 2x4, then it also lacks (or is ...


3

Why not simply construct a series of 8' long workbenches? This will give you more flexibility later on, if you need to deploy them differently (e.g. in an "L" shape instead of end-to-end. HTH.


3

If you watch the back of the opener starting at around :54 in the video, you'll notice that the LED indicator flashes 4 times. For Craftsman openers, this is almost always the code for an issue with the interrupt sensors. Make sure that they are clean and getting power (no wire breaks, etc.), and then follow the instructions in the owners manual for ...


3

I'm assuming since this question is over a year old you've probably found the help you need, but i'm here so here's my answer. The framing should be a consistent 16 inches from center to center of each board, if your rafters don't allow for this sort of layout the MAX i'd suggest would be about 18-20 inches, any more than that and you'll run the risk of the ...


3

Fiberglass is an option. I would go roxul though with your climate. However insulation is the least of your worry. If you want to run lines to an area of your house in your climate it must be a conditioned space - meaning it needs heat. Really the only option you have in Denver is to run your lines to a shared wall with the inside of your house and ...


3

If your budget permits, why not go with spray foam insulation? On top of that, you might also consider adding foam panel insulation to the garage door (if yours is not already a solid core garage door).


3

I find that stucco homes have this problem because of the metal mesh in the walls act like a faraday cage. You may be able to extend the antenna to the exterior of the garage and it will work better.


2

Heat tape will keep the hose from freezing (where it's attached) but there are other freezing risks... e.g. where are the pipes coming from? Do they go into the uninsulated wall? Also there is still water inside the washing machine itself that can freeze. Frankly installing a washing machine in a cold, unheated garage was not a great idea. I think you need ...


2

Instead of a space heater, try some pipe heating cable. This is a simple electric resistance heater that is designed to be wrapped around pipes in order to prevent freezing. The good ones have a thermostat built-in, so they'll only kick on if necessary. You wrap the cable around your pipes, apply insulation over the wrapped pipes, and plug it in. This ...


2

2x's laying flat as opposed to on edge are going to bend or break when weight is suspended from it over time. The longer the board the faster it will compress or fail. To remedy this problem you must add support to the existing framing members. I think the simplest way is to install additional 2 x 4's (on edge) attached against the edge of the original 2 x ...


2

Water plays a major role when maintaining the surface of your driveway. It can have drastic effects on concrete surfaces. When it is absorbed or flows into a hardscape, water will start it's damage by an expansion and contraction cycle. This is accelerated in climates that are prone to freezing weather. Hot weather and exposure to direct sunlight (UV rays) ...


2

the arrow (triangle) always points in the direction of air flow (from the compressor to the tool). In this case you would attach the filter (arrow side) to the air line usually after a valve (but not always) and on the opposite side a hose (or whatever accessories there may be). Use Teflon tape on all threads And don't use paste which may clog tool ports. ...


2

Breaker Be certain you are using a double-pole 20A or two handle-tied 20A breakers for your 12/3 multiwire circuit. Share the load, Frodo! What I have drawn can essentially share your potential loads equally between your two branches if you wire half the garage receptacles to the LOAD side of one GFCI and the other half to the LOAD side of the second ...


2

8' benches are worth considering for a couple of reasons: the sheet goods you use on top will be that length. You'll get a slightly shorter span between legs, which will lead to more stiffness. That said, if you need 132", there are a few options: find a better lumber supplier. (Don't know where you are, but you should be able to find a lumberyard ...


2

You really should remove the stuff that was mixed overly wet - that tends to make cement products very weak. As a result, it should be easy to remove - might even come out with a stiff broom, if not, stiff wire brush might well do it. Check the labelling on your paint - in most cases you should wait at least 30 days before painting (or attempting to paint) ...


2

Yes, saftey sensors are quite important. You could build a shield or guard to protect them from bumps. There are covers available, but I can't speak to how well they work. International Residential Code 2012 Chapter 3 Building Planning Section 309 Garages and Carports R309.4 Automatic Garage Door Openers Automatic garage door openers, if ...


2

These outlets will need to be GFCI protected if the garage door opener outlet isn't already that way, but yes -- there isn't a limit on how many receptacles can go on a general receptacle circuit. Do double check to make sure that your circuit doesn't serve something else funky though.


2

I have a few comments: That is a pretty enormous car but looking online it seems like you should have about 2.5 feet on either side. That seems like enough. I assume you'll get more comfortable about maneuvering in the garage once you've done it a few times. If you are concerned about the length, the are a variety of tools that can help you pull in far ...


2

@ArchonOSX's answer is good, as long as the local drainage is good enough. If not, I'd install a trench drain that extends further down the slope to where it can discharge back onto the sidewalk, but that depends on the situation. I'm guessing the door is 8' wide, and the sidewalk falls 5" across it, which means the sidewalk has about 1/2" per foot pitch. ...


2

To answer your main question, having the wiring cross is not in itself a problem. However it sounds like you may just have romex / NM strapped to the underside of the ceiling, that isn't likely up to code. In a workshop, I might err towards caution and pipe it all up. This is not as much trouble or expense as you might think in a single open room. In a ...


2

I had this happen to one of my garage doors. The sensor "eyes" are attached to the rails. Over time the bottom of one of the rails worked itself a little loose and I found that the vibration of the door coming down would rattle the rail and disturb or misalign the sensor to the point that it would read an interruption and the door would reopen. I found other ...



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