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In my last house a daylight basement the original sheetrock was glued to the cement walls with liquid nails that worked very well. I did pull it all out and add furring for electrical spaces. (I don't like exposed conduit and surface boxes in a room that became my man land). If you are worried about cracking at the sill add a accent trim over the gap.


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If there's enough headroom above the basement stairs, I could consider building a staircase over the existing basement stairs. Then you get to pick a height that works for all directions.


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One possible solution (there are no doubt others, and I'll be interested to see what they are) is to set a strip (4 to 12" wide) of 1/2" cement-based tile-backer board at the bottom edge of the drywall.


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Here's your best bet: Build a landing outside the door basically where the current top level is, but shift it a bit to come out at a 45 from the corner to the right of the door (where the exposed stud is). This gives you more clearance when you're carrying groceries in through the door. Bring one conventional step down to the left, square with the wall. ...


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I would acid etch the old cement with a strong muriatic acid solution to clean and make the surface rough. Then add a adhesive promoter like Moos milk painted on the slab that will help the cement bond and reduce cracking. I have done this on floors as thin as 3/4" and as thick as 2" with good results. With a thin slab a fine aggregate like 1/4" will also ...


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Sorry to combine many parts of the other answers, but none so far have all the components to fully satisfy your question. First, you definitely need a pulley near the ceiling to remove yourself from the ladder permanently. If you can mount a pulley on your wall perpendicular to the direction of the canoe hoist, you could use this unit. If you need to be ...



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