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18

Jonathan, your problem is very common. Do you know what is in the floor for insulation now? Assuming there is some f/G batts or something similar, it would be hard to try to add anything else, such as high density cellulose directly into the cavities. As much as you probably don't want to hear it, the best way is going to remove the sheetrock from the ...


15

Rooms above garages are often done improperly. It's amazing, because it really isn't all that difficult, but a lot of people seem to mess it up. Unfortunately, there's no "easy" way: You're going to have to remove some drywall to inspect and see how the insulation in the ceiling is done. There may or may not be a gap in the space, depending on how the ...


13

I just finished our garage this past summer and here are a few things I did. I insulated the garage door by cutting pieces of rigid insulation foam to fit into each piece of the garage door. You can glue them on and then seal the edges with expanding foam or caulk. On the side of garage door I installed weather strips and also on the top/bottom of the ...


12

Personally, I'd prefer my garage door opener to be outlet powered so that I can unplug the thing when I need to do something with it, instead of going to find a breaker. Other than ease of disabling, I don't think there is any compelling operational reason to do one or the other. Of course, if your next opener can't be hardwired, that might be a reason to ...


10

You could swap the emitter and detector units so that the emitter is on the sunlit side. It doesn't matter if the emitter is being blasted by sunlight; only the detector needs to be protected. Of course you might just be changing the time of day of your problem if the other side of the door is sunlit at a different time. :) Don't forget to swap the ...


10

Lots of things can be wrong with your garage door or opener: It could be something as simple as needing to replace the springs. If they are torsion springs, you're going to want to consult a professional, as they can store a deadly amount of tension. Consider it as dangerous as electric repairs. Some garage door openers operate on battery. You might need ...


10

You don't really need an "air compressor" in the sense that you don't need something that has a tank and is designed for use with tools. All you really need is sometimes called a "tire inflator", obviously it is actually an air compressor but it is very different from those listed by Jeff's answer. I have seen two basic types. There are 12V versions that ...


10

It sounds like the controller needs to be reset and the remotes reprogrammed. Usually this requires physical access to the opener, but if you have a hardwired remote it might be possible to pair it via the keypad. Check the manual for your opener. But back to the problem of how to open it. If the garage does not have an alternative access there should be a ...


9

You probably only have to shield the sensor just enough to put a shadow over it (and not let the sun hit it directly). I would think a small piece of cardboard taped to the side or top (or both) of the sensor that is getting hit with the sun should do it. Another way would be to block the sun from outside of the garage by maybe planting a shrub (test it ...


9

I have to ask, who gave you permission to drill into the wall? If you say your spouse, then maybe you need to take some home improvement classes at the adult education night school at your local high school! Just joking..... But seriously, if you have run into the concrete blocks, you need to use masonry bits with a hammer drill to bore the holes, and ...


8

You might find what you want by looking up bar sinks. They are made that small.


8

You may consider just replacing your garage door with an insulated one. It's definitely more expensive than insulating it yourself, but it will do a better job insulating, and especially if your door is older it will update the look of your house.


8

I personally wouldn't do it. Even if you could find a suitable hatch, you'd need a good way to clean it out regularly. When I lived in an apartment complex with a hatch, it was foul; it was bad enough that they'd spray for bugs every 3-4 months, and in the process, drive the bugs into other apartments (and mine was right next to the chute ... so make sure, ...


8

You just need bigger anchors ;-) The largest of these is 60" long with a 7" diameter.


8

Anecdotal I guess, but I've had a fire extinguisher out in my barn for years now and it's never been a problem. Being in Michigan, it regularly gets below 0F. Granted, I've never actually tried to use it, but I think the freezing point of the chemicals in there is way below zero. ETA: Looking at this page it seems like the operating temp of a typical ...


8

Your local fire department should take them off your hands and dispose of them properly (in an environmentally safe manner) and safely. I say the above, as I recently wanted to dispose of some old engine coolant in a responsible manner and didn't know where I could take it for disposal, so I went to our local fire station to ask them, they pointed me in the ...


8

Since the transformer says "Gaslight Conversions", that's a pretty strong clue that it's part of a lighting system from Gaslight Conversions, located in St Paul MN, which also matches what's written on the transformer. If you've ruled out all of your exterior lighting, it may be leftover from a low voltage lighting system that was replaced but never fully ...


7

The proper way to fix it is to dig- all the way down to 6" below the bottom of the foundation- then install drain tile & gravel. Coat the outside of the walls with tar, then install plastic protector sheets so it doesn't get damaged by the backfill. Condensation could still be an issue- perhaps installing closed-cell foam around the outside (say, 2-4" ...


7

They make garage door insulation kits. I have never tried one, but I have seen them in the stores. Owens Corning Insulation Kit:


7

" I'm in the woods, so it's largely protected from the wind, but I still want to make sure it stays put." Tie it to the trees. If you're willing to dig a little find a root, rope under the root, and tie the tarp to that. For a no-cement job try something like a 'snow anchor'. Tie your tarp down to a metal stake or a brick then bury that. The thing you tie ...


7

One of the custom door manufacturers should be able to make you something. Yes, it's not a typical application being that small, but there's no major issues in the design. Doors are assembled from panels, so they can select the right size and quantity. Track frequently has to be cut down to fit anyways. Custom springs are no big deal (a surprising ...


7

The simplest solution will be to install a larger door sweep on the inside. Sweeps come in a variety of sizes and styles. Check the out at any home improvement store. They easily attach to the door with a few screws and are adjustable so you can be sure they gently touch the floor and solve your gap problem


7

The easiest thing for you (still requires DIY though) is to buy these - or something similar. They are time delay relays - now you get several versions/modes. Something like this (PDF) On/Off Cycle - is what you are looking for i guess. You also get, Interval,Delay-On-Make, Re-Triggerable Single-Shot, etc Then say you got 5 lights you set and mark ...


7

That isn't how gravity works. Drains like sinks are typically gravity drains where the water is drawn down into the drainpipe... by gravity. This is in contrast to things like washing-machines where the wastewater is pumped out into standpipes. In order to drain your sink via a standpipe above the fixture you'll need a drain pump or drain into a sump and ...


7

Shelf construction If the shelf has its front open edge positioned such that at each four feet the cable would go up to a separate roof truss than I think that you have a workable system. Make sure that your 2x3's under the outer shelf edges are placed to that the nominal "3" inch dimension is vertical. Hardware Note that the lowest cost eyebolts, known ...


6

I would recommend an oil-filled radiator style rather than an open coil style. This should reduce the chances of fumes and sawdust igniting.


6

The minimum fire code for connected garage spaces common to a living area is the rating of 5/8" drywall, or 1 hour. If you have a crawl space from the garage, you will need to seal it with a fire rated door of the same time rating or cover the hole with F/R sheetrock. This also applies to any vents, though piping, common wall windows, doors etc.


6

Your attic definitely does need ventilation. However, it seems really odd to me that it is vented down into your garage. Is there any kind of gas powered appliances nearby? If not, I would: Install some roof vents and maybe an attic fan. Install soffit vents or some way for air to get in. (you want to create a FLOW all the way through your attic) ...


6

That article seems to still be correct. When running exposed cable, the main concern is protecting the cable from damage. Which means not running cable on the face of framing members, no horizontal runs below 8' (from the floor), and try to avoid perpendicular runs through rafters. When running cables between two receptacles, you'll want to run vertically ...


6

The answer is a semi-useless "It depends." Tank size, oil vs. oil-free, CFM, etc. Most compressors will come with a little kit (usually sells for ~$20) that has a length of hose, an air chuck, and some air tool fittings. CFM Rating I think the most important thing to pay attention to is CFM. This tells you how much total flow the compressor can provide on ...



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