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11

Strangely enough, I have had to deal with this same problem a few times. Short of raising the garage or pouring a second higher floor, the solution is in the driveway. We had to excavate apx 6 feet of asphalt and create a gradual dip draining away from the house and garage to exit water. Obviously, they screwed up big time when the driveway was installed. ...


11

The rail from the garage door should be lubricated with White Lithium Grease, whether it's a chain or a screw type. Run a bead of grease along the top of it, then run the garage door up and down a few times. The wheels, track and spring should be lubricated with your favorite lubricant oil -- not WD-40, which is a cleaner and penetrant, not a lube -- but ...


9

Depends if it is a swinging door (California) or a roll up door. The roll up has one spring that runs across the header. If you mess with this you are messing with death. It's that simple. The California style that swings out has two springs on each side of the door. These springs can be changed as a DIY. Open the door, which will be very hard, and ...


9

I've replaced my own garage door torsion springs twice, and I'm still alive to talk about it; it's absolutely doable. I learned how to do the replacement from Richard Kinch's exceedingly thorough page on the subject, so I'm going to quote heavily from it; all credit goes to him. I'm going to provide the highlights here, but read and re-read the information ...


9

The sensors are a safety requirement. Excess sunlight may be saturating them to the point they cannot pickup the signal from the other one. I would suggest adding some kind of shade or hood around which one is picking up light from the other. An empty toilet paper cardboard roll might work, depending on how the sensor is placed around the door track.


9

In addition to the other ideas suggested you may want to investigate installing a driveway drain that is a trough cut across the driveway and covered over with a grate. This way any water that comes to near the garage enters the trough and gets shunted to the side of the driveway. The shunted water can then pour into a large french drain or could be diverted ...


7

One of the custom door manufacturers should be able to make you something. Yes, it's not a typical application being that small, but there's no major issues in the design. Doors are assembled from panels, so they can select the right size and quantity. Track frequently has to be cut down to fit anyways. Custom springs are no big deal (a surprising ...


6

Unless you know how to unload the tension on the torsion spring, this is not safe for you to do yourself. There are plenty of videos on the internet that show you how to do it, but be aware that the consequences ofusing the wrong tools or doing it wrong will likely result in serious injury, such as broken bones or amputated limbs, or death. You should ...


5

Carefully determine where the wheels of the bottom of your door stop being used. Any point below the bottom of the wheels when the door is completely down should be safe to remove. The track shouldn't have to go all the way to the ground. I would not paint the track, for fear that it will interfere with smooth motion. If anything I'd use grease to lube ...


4

Create a trough to a sump hole and put in a sump pump. It won't keep the water out, per Se, but will manage it so it doesn't get any farther than the entrance.


4

Is the garage door made out of steel? Here is a good article on repainting rusty steel: I think the key is to prep by washing the area and then removing as much rust as possible by scraping and then using a wire brush (or even sanding). Prime the area with Rustoleum. The topcoat should be high quality latex exterior paint.


4

These look nice You could probably build a simpler version pretty cheap. Also if the doors are large enough, and you are ambitious enough you could put a smaller "man" door in one of the doors. That way when you go in and out you don't have to open the large doors, but you still have the large doors for getting large projects/lawn tractor in and out. ...


4

Turning a cold space into a warm space is absolutely doable, but the trick is doing it the right way to avoid creating longer term health or structural problems later. The proper way to create a warm space is to create two different kinds of protections against the elements - a thermal break to hold in heat, and a moisture barrier to hold in water. The ...


3

Insulating a garage is fairly straight forward, however keeping it constantly above freezing in an area of sustained cold temps is more involved and potentially expensive. You can easily put batt or roll style insulation in the walls, no brainer... You could install batts or roll between the rafters, but that creates a much larger volume to heat. It would ...


3

most of the major door manufacturers have a low-clearance kit. When mine was installed, i found it to be mostly a set of special hinges for the top door panel; whose operation depressed the arc of the top door panel.


3

To summarize the comments -- this is not a job that should be done by yourself if you are an amateur do-it-yourselfer. The springs in question are very powerful and the risk of injury is high. Call a professional.


3

Genie makes a lubricant specifically designed for their screw drive openers. I used it at my old house and it seemed to work fairly well. You can buy it any major home centers. I believe they came in packs of 3 tubes and each tube was designed for one lubrication. I lubricated mine about every 6 months.


3

You should check the operation and safety mechanisms of any automatic garage door opener probably twice a year or so, to ensure that they are operating safely. If you place a 2x4 flat on the floor, the door should reverse when it hits it. If you remove the 2x4, the door should close fully but not try to close after it's closed (the opener should not be ...


2

Unfortunately, this is a very difficult question to answer without knowing the specific make and model of your garage door. For instance, with my Garador model, replacing the springs is very simply, easy and safe, if you are careful. In fact I've replaced both springs over the last couple of years, after they snapped (they are now around 40 years old). In ...


2

since you already have a 2-3 drop-off, take advantage of that and install a french drain inside the garage, but on top of the garage floor.


2

you might consider a roll-up garage door. check out http://www.buydoorsdirect.com/


2

Typically, garage openers have a release pull that hangs down from the track. When closed, this release will be close enough to the door to get if you drill a 5/8 inch hole about a foot under the where the opener attaches to the door. Fish for the line with a wire coat hanger and then pull to release. It will take a couple of tries but you should be able ...


2

Another thing to try, as mentioned earlier is to divert the water, Option 1: - install a better rubber seal to prevent water from entering the garage Garage Door Hump - Rubber The other option (although quite rough in the example), is a cement hump that will divert the water away from the garage. Although, in my opinion, I would rather place the hump ...


2

If the lock is separate from the handle and turns freely, my guess is the handle is the issue, not the lock. Overhead garage doors almost always latch by extending pins through the tracks on either side of the door. It is likely that one of these just got bound due to expansion, contraction, ice lifting, or whatnot. I'd try a couple things before doing ...


2

It sounds like the chain might not be on the sprocket that drives it. Get up on a ladder and look at the top of the unit. You should be able to easily see if the chain is off the sprocket. Try running the opener while you are up there too. If the chain has come off you will need to loosen the chain tension, place the chain back over the sprocket and ...


1

As you're using your garage for storage, and not a vehicle, you could replace the door with shed-style doors ... but it will decrease the resale value of the house, and they don't seal against the weather quite as well. Depending on the neighborhood, it may also violate your covenant. update: oops, missed the part below the picture, where you said it ...


1

The lock is a standard household door lock, not really designed for doors that slop around as much as garage or barn doors do. You'd have to do a bit of jury-rigging, since they are virtually all designed for modern-style roll-up garage doors, but a garage door style lock will have considerably more slop and adjustability. You'd probably have to mount either ...


1

Is the weather seal screwed in? I would recommend removing the weather seal and replacing it with new. Install the top piece first. Do not cut it long so you have to force it into place; cut it to fit tight at the ends but you should not have to force it into place. use ring shanked colored nails and nail about every 6-9". Do not over tighten the nails, ...


1

If you disengage the garage door opener and lift the door up by hand, is it an effort to lift it? If you let go of the door in mid-air, does it stay there? if not, then you probably need the springs re-tensioned. I recently had my springs re-tensioned on my garage door which is quite large (14'x11.5') and heavy. The door wouldn't stay up on its own and I ...



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