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I saw interference mentioned on a couple of responses. My hardwired buttons worked every time. None of the remotes (including the punch code one) worked. Climbed on step ladder and noticed crackling noise and flickering Compact Florescent Bulb CFL. Took out CFL. Good bye interference Everything works. Thanks


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I'd focus first on the mechanical condition of the doors. I have some huge industrial doors (drive-through for semi's) with enormous power openers. They were very distressed from 40 years of abuse, I overhauled them. With such burly openers, I assumed it would be humanly impossible to open the doors by hand. Nope! They threw open easily. And then I ...


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What can suffer on some designs is the cables. They fray and effectively stretch, reducing the assistance from the spring (they can go almost completely slack when the door is shut). The good news is they're not hard to replace.


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No, they don't measurably stretch. The reason is that, by design, the springs are not extended beyond their elastic limit at any point in the open/close cycle. The amount of "annealing" that takes place over your lifetime is too small to worry about -- or measure.


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Why not grab some interior standard outlet (120VAC), plug a 3 VDC transformer/converter in, and feed the battery connections directly inside the keypad? That guarantees plenty of power and avoids a rather messy job (installing a mechanical momentary keyswitch).


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To hardwire this -- assuming your opener has thge terminals fgor doing so -- you would want either a double-momentary keyswitch, or a housing which takes a lock cylinder and uses its tailpiece to actuate a pair of momentary switches, plus appropriate mounting hardware and wires. The latter gives you more flexibility in picking a cylinder that, eg, matches ...



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