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12

Personally, I'd prefer my garage door opener to be outlet powered so that I can unplug the thing when I need to do something with it, instead of going to find a breaker. Other than ease of disabling, I don't think there is any compelling operational reason to do one or the other. Of course, if your next opener can't be hardwired, that might be a reason to ...


10

You could swap the emitter and detector units so that the emitter is on the sunlit side. It doesn't matter if the emitter is being blasted by sunlight; only the detector needs to be protected. Of course you might just be changing the time of day of your problem if the other side of the door is sunlit at a different time. :) Don't forget to swap the ...


10

It sounds like the controller needs to be reset and the remotes reprogrammed. Usually this requires physical access to the opener, but if you have a hardwired remote it might be possible to pair it via the keypad. Check the manual for your opener. But back to the problem of how to open it. If the garage does not have an alternative access there should be a ...


9

You probably only have to shield the sensor just enough to put a shadow over it (and not let the sun hit it directly). I would think a small piece of cardboard taped to the side or top (or both) of the sensor that is getting hit with the sun should do it. Another way would be to block the sun from outside of the garage by maybe planting a shrub (test it ...


8

This is most likely due to the auto reversing function. This is where the door will reverse open if it hits an obstacle when closing. One possible cause is that there is an obstruction on the floor where the door meets the floor. Look for any irregularities on the floor and on the bottom of the garage door. You might find something stuck to the bottom ...


7

First unplug the opener. Now look in the light socket. See if the small metal tab at the bottom is nearly flat. Carefully pull it up a little bit so it applys more spring tension to the bulb. Also, they used to sell "rough service" Incandescent bulbs for openers, but I have had OK luck with compact fluorescents.


7

Vibration is still a good guess. Try a "rough service" bulb, usually sold for the work lights that you hang under the hood of your car. You can also try a 130V bulb; cheaper bulbs are rated at 120V, and so don't tolerate line voltage fluctuations as much. Another option is an LED bulb. A 40W-equivalent is in the $10 range, and they are supposed to be very ...


7

Powered graphite will be very messy. I still recommend spray on white lithium grease or garage door lube from PB Blaster. Both products are great for the chain, rollers, and roller channels. Never use WD 40 or any type of oils.


7

There are several things that could cause a door opener to not work properly. Tester101 put most of them in his comment, but most of those would at least result in the opener visibly and audibly trying to open the door, and then giving up. This may sound counterintuitive but my first priority would be getting the light working. Most garage door openers use ...


5

Most garage door openers need just a few inches above the garage door to work. If you have 6 inches above the opened garage door you should be fine. Some garage door openers need more space above the motor than others. Chain drives with the chain sprocket on top come to mind.


5

Carefully determine where the wheels of the bottom of your door stop being used. Any point below the bottom of the wheels when the door is completely down should be safe to remove. The track shouldn't have to go all the way to the ground. I would not paint the track, for fear that it will interfere with smooth motion. If anything I'd use grease to lube ...


5

Check your sensors. The sensors could also be very dirty or blocked by something. Openers also often have cutout sensors that will stop the drive when the load gets too high on the motor. It may be that the load in your case may be too high due to wear, dragging rollers, bent track, lack of lubrication, or rusty chain/screw. Look for these things and ...


4

Most garage door openers have a feature that when they encounter too much resistance, they will reverse. This is to prevent the door from trapping/crushing something that didn't get out of the way (a car, person, or your dog). It sounds like the door isn't jamming completely, but it is just "rough" in one spot of the travel, which kicks the the opener into ...


4

You are essentially building a self-supporting flat-roofed shed inside the garage, not adding interior walls to the garage. You should be able to screw a 2x4 sill plate onto the garage floor. The sill plate is mostly there in case the concrete is uneven. It could be pressure-treated in order to resist rotting from moisture on the floor or in the concrete. ...


4

In some countries (Sweden for one) it's illegal to hardwire electrics unless you're an authorized electrician. So, outlets are simpler & safer to work with. Hardwiring looks better, OTOH, and can't be tampered with as easily. :)


4

Some, especially Craftsman have limit switches mounted on the chain rail. These have a bad habit of creeping, and would cause this problem. Otherwise, the problem is probably with the sensitivity adjustments as mentioned in last post.


4

The sensors (the "eyes" that are on both sides of the door opening) are probably "out of whack". If the sensors are not aligned properly, the doors won't operate. They could of been kicked by accident.


3

I found the answer at http://www.thathomesite.com/forums/load/garages/msg0321575526348.html?38 - here it is: First off you don't have to replace the worm gear. Second, you need to make sure that the bushings in the gear kit are not worn. You can tell by looking and the very top of the unit, you will see ground up metal, or on the top of your drive gear will ...


3

if sunlight on the sensor isn't causing the issue, then the problem is either bad opener, bad wiring or a bad sensor. when the sensors are not working, use a multimeter to test the voltage put out by the opener. if that's not right, then you might have a bad opener. next i would try disconnecting all of the wires at both ends, cutting off the exposed ...


3

Lower wattage bulbs don't last as long as higher wattage bulbs. If your garage has a high ceiling the longer braces between the tracks and the ceiling allow for more vibration than in installation with a lower ceiling. When I had problems with frequent bulb changes, I used one of these in place of the bulb: Bulb socket outlet adapter Then I mounted one ...


3

Placing a tube around the sensor/emitter might work, but it sounds like that would easily break if kicked or struck by something passing by. Perhaps a polarized filter for a camera would be taped or somehow fixed to the unit. Amazon has this one for $11.99.


3

Do you have a button switch on the wall to open - close? There are usually two wires going to that. I don't think it will hurt to short those wires momentarily to test it. If it did, Lift Master would get a lot of returns because I'm certain many people have shorted the wired pair upon installation. My Craftsman has two wires going to a multiple switch ...


3

If it's doing this without the opener connected it sounds like the torsion springs need to be adjusted to balance the garage door properly. The balance point of the door should be about half way open--when the opener is disconnected and you give it a push open or closed it should naturally stop about half way. The springs have to be adjusted under tension, ...


3

What is the condition of the batteries in the remotes? Make sure that you have good fresh batteries so that a strong signal gets to the garage door opener base unit. Also evaluate if it is possible that something has changed in the area around the garage door main unit. Have you recently placed some large metal object nearby that may affect the RF signal ...


3

If you have an older style garage door remote, before they used rolling codes, you could very easily have some people driving by activating it accidentally. I had a similar problem, so I ended up unplugging the remote control portion of it, so the wall mount switch still works, and the whole unit is going to be replaced soon anyways (electric eye sensor, ...


3

The garage door will automatically reverse if it encounters too much resistance or if the sensor beam is interrupted. To check for resistance, start with the door closed and pull the red handle. Then open and close the door. The movement should be fluid with no tough spots. If you encounter difficult spots, you likely have a bent track or a broken wheel. ...


3

Garage door openers are subjected to a lot of vibration in normal use. There are even special garage door opener incandescent light bulbs which have a stronger filament than usual, to resist breakage from shaking. Since you've tried different bulbs, the next most likely issue is a bad connection at the socket. It could be in the socket itself. There is ...


2

Try a different brand of light bulbs. Another brand might have a slightly larger base or have a little bit more friction to prevent the bulb from loosening due to the friction.


2

I had the same issue. I tried shading both the sensor and the emitter with card board and toilet paper rolls. Sometimes it worked and sometimes it didn't. Today it wouldn't cooperate at all. I even tried re-aiming the sensors. I was able to prove that it was the sun causing the issue by closing the door, disengaging the door from the opener, and ...


2

I used an old pair of polarized plastic safety sunglasses that were $6.00 new. I cut one lens off and slid it behind the sensor so that it covers the lens: no more sun problem stopping the beam so the door now works.



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