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10

You raise a number of issues. How to fill an irregularly shaped hole? To cut drywall (or any panel) to an exact shape with non parallel sides is hard. So what we usually do is make the hole regular. You can trim away some of the remaining drywall, preferably so the edge runs along the middle of a stud, parallel to another stud or the corner. Then cut a ...


5

There may or may not be an easy answer to your question. I would start by calling the grout and tile manufacturers to get their opinion. In general though... You should reasonably expect to get the quality of service you contracted and paid for. Bottom line is do you think you're getting what you paid for. Not what you think you paid for. If you hire the ...


5

If you're not happy with the job or you have concerns, you should talk to the contractor. Make sure it's very clear what quality level you expect, and that you're concerned that this does not meet that expectation. You may find that there was a reason the tile was installed in this way, and that the experienced tiler knows you'll never notice the flaws in ...


5

I think your third idea will work and look the best. First fill the void with expanding foam, allow the foam to cure, then cut it off flush with the face of the existing door trim. Then cover the area with whatever molding/trim you find most aesthetically pleasing. You may wish to miter or cope the corners to get a more finished appearance.


4

You will want to clean the area first. Scrape and moderately sand any peeling paint. Afterwards use a latex caulking which you can find at any home improvement store. This caulking is paintable which is the main reason I would use it and also shrinks and expands with temperature and moisture changes. Once the caulk is completely cured according to the ...


4

If you want to fill a large gap with caulk, the first thing you do is fill the gap with a caulk "backer rod" that's made of foam. They come in various diameters are are typically found near the weather stripping in a home improvement store. You shove the backer in with a putty knife (not too deep, just enough to be below the surface), and then cover with ...


3

Drywall compound by itself might not be the best solution since its not really a great gap filler; it requires a backing to adhere to which is why you use either paper or fiberglass tape when putting up drywall. As tester101 suggested, you could use crown molding or quarter round to cover it up. I would imagine that filling it with mortar might give the ...


2

It is hard to tell from the picture how wide it is. If it is 1/8 inch or less I would caulk it. If it is bigger than I would go over it with wood putty. You can paint over each. Also if you use wood putty chances are it will eventually form a small crack (expansion) and need to be caulked.


1

I'll both disagree and agree with @RedGrittyBrick's comment. The best solution is to treat the existing floor as a subfloor and lay a tight new floor over it at right angles or diagonally to the existing boards. Pulling up an existing floor is almost never the best (especially when cost is an object, and it usually is) solution unless it's rotten.


1

I have used bondo successfully for several such repairs, with a foam backing. You can get minwax wood filler but bondo will work just as well. You can paint to match after applying.


1

If you have access to the same tiles that you used, you could cut them to size (you may want to consider using a good cutter or wet saw). That way you can caulk the space in between the tile and the acrylic shower base. If you don't have any extra tiles or can't find any more of the same type, you could find a nice complementary looking small tile and ...



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