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You may be able to find some NOS (new old stock) pulls of the same type on eBay or Etsy. I recently did the same thing for an old writing desk that was missing one of the pulls. I couldn't find a match for the missing one, so I replaced the whole set. If you want them repaired, then they will probably need to be brazed and re-tapped. That is a job that you ...


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If I don't have kids or pets and live outside a quake zone, is there furniture that doesn't need to be attached to the wall? Yes, anything made out of real wood that has a foot at each corner or generally, anything not from [expletives] IKEA.


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That changes when you live in earthquake country I live in earthquake country (Tokyo) Every home center here has an entire aisle of brackets, braces, anchors etc. designed to hold things up without drilling - useful as most apartment walls are bunker-grade concrete. However, nothing in our place is attached. We deliberately pack it bottom-heavy, don't ...


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As a landlord I would say it's not the putting holes in the walls that I don't like, it's the leaving holes I have a problem with. As long as it's a normal sheet rock and paint wall, not paneling, finished woodworking, or masonry, that's a different story. A few holes for a noble cause (keeping your bookshelf from crushing a toddler for example) is not an ...


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Do they prohibit you from nailing pictures to the wall too? If so, that's ridiculous. If not, then do this: Use a stud finder to find a stud. Drive a 2" drywall screw through the furniture anchor and the drywall and 1.5" into the stud. Anchor the furniture. Plan to move out in a few years. Patch the hole with a dab of spackling compound. The hole you'll ...


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I have never fastened freestanding furniture to the wall, until recently when I had children. I have never had a dresser or shelving unit tip. I don't live in an area where earthquakes are common, and I'm guessing you don't either if the landlord won't let you fasten furniture to the wall. However, in defying the manufactures instructions you are doing ...


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It is good practice to anchor any piece of furniture which could topple [or for that matter anything which could topple]. Some reasons furniture might topple: Seismic activity: Beyond moving, this is out of a person's control. Improper Loading: e.g. bookshelves with heavy items on upper shelves above light items on lower shelves or file cabinets with full ...


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You could remove the brace, drill holes into the other bars that are thiner and move the brace up closer to the glass. Obviously the closer you get to the top the less steady it will become so only allow enough room to where you are comfortable. I actually use to have the same desk in black. The glass makes it heavy so as long as one side is braced correctly ...



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