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If one broke the rest are next. Fix this one and do the same thing to all of them before they do. Drill pilot holes (red dots) and attach with short screws (be careful not to punch though the side of the cabinet). Since this one is broken it needs some screws where the blue dots are too. On the rest of them, I'd do screws in the two red places and one ...


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It is hard to tell from the picture if the rail is made of plastic or pot metal. In either case it is possible to repair the rail. The idea is to glue in a piece of metal into the channel of the rail. Several things to consider: If the rail is pot metal with a brown paint or plastic covering that should be removed from the channel before trying to glue in ...


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This is a simple "barrister's bookcase" door mechanism. There are several versions on the market; a bit of searching may find a match for yours, or you may need to replace the hardware completely.


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I have found that OSB plus Redgard is really really a good combo. The redgard is kind of thick and can't really be sanded so use is kind of all or none but it does have high functionality/durability and you can paint it.


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There is a related question over in Woodworking. There are some great suggestions here.


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I'd tend to fall in the "OSB furniture sounds like a terrible idea" camp, but anyway... Two steps come to mind - one is to seal the cut edges thoroughly using either a thin epoxy or a varnish/polyurethane type of product, to both bind small slivers and prevent or at least slow moisture intake and resultant edge swelling. The other is to sand the edges (you ...


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Using a router with a good carbide/carbide tipped bit, preferably a spiral cut one makes incredibly nice edges on most surfaces. Some companies even make some specifically designed for OSB, Laminate, formica, and harder materials. I think a good sharp bit, running at an appropriate speed will leave you with the finish you're looking for.


1

I'm sure you will be a lot happier sleeping on your home made design if you add some diagonal braces -- one across the back and one on each side. Professional furniture designers know how to construct strong joints using hard wood and proper brackets, but with the materials and techniques available to us amateurs it is wiser to overbuild a little.


4

It seems like you are actually asking several questions here, so I'll break down my answer: Is spruce appropriate? short answer: yes. A softwood like spruce will be relatively inexpensive, and plenty strong enough if you use thick enough pieces. Be aware that it may dent more easily than a hardwood. For a project like this, almost any kind of wood will be ...


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I would use an old solid tableleaf. ThankYou


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As @ JPhi1618 has stated try adding a second clamp on the top of the shelves. Before trying that I would try bolting the shelves to the smaller hinge pin hole. For visual appearance sake I would try either a carriage bolt or a flat head screw that is counter sunk.


3

Your problem is there's nothing holding the 4 posts in place. The fix is to attach the shelves to the posts as tightly as possible - they can't just set on the posts. What you've basically done is tried to create a large version of these common steel shelves: If you've ever put one together, the strength and stability comes from the wedge anchors on ...


4

The key to a mortise and tennon joint is the glue surface. Often, in a manufacturing environment, when the joint is assembled, they will shoot a nail into to hold the joint until the glue dries instead of putting it into a clamp and waiting for it to dry. This speeds up production and takes up less space. There is nothing wrong with that method, but it ...



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