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22

I'd use plywood with a thicker piece of hardwood glued onto the front edge. This gives you very good strength. Here is an online calculator I use to find what kind of materials you can use and the amount of sag you will have. Here's a good quote from the author of the site. “The eye will notice a deflection of 1/32″ per running foot.” The sagulator


20

I've built this desk twice. It costs me ~$100 USD in materials: And here is my version of the desk: You can adjust it, but it is a little difficult. However, you can fit a modified treadmill under it as you can see in this video of me using the desk. I'm able to type comfortably while walking at 2.2 MPH. If I may presume that the reason you want a ...


19

This is just my opinion, but I think you might be hard pressed to build one cheaper than you can buy one. If you're just looking for a project, it might be a challenging one. But if you're looking to save money building your own, I don't think you will. If you own your own fabrication shop and have lots of scrap to use then this might be an interesting ...


13

If you want to make a non-traditional desk you could have four posts fashioned together into a frame that goes high in the air. You could then "hang" the desk using an easily adjustable pulley system to raise or lower the desk. The surface could then be on a track system to keep it secure. There would be plenty of caveats but something like this could work ...


13

The short ends you pictured are the cross grains of the board. What I see is that you have used a too course sandpaper on these edges. This should be easy to fix. You need to step down the grit of the sand paper. any final sanding should be done with 220 or 320 paper. On these end details, use fine paper, break it's (paper's) back so it is flexible, and ...


12

Strong and light and cheap? Take a look at torsion box construction. Granted it's not exactly thin but as @Joe mentioned, getting all four of those qualities is a tall order.


12

I recommend Kim Stanley Robinson's Bibliography, fleshed out with some Frank Herbert, and a large solid hardback for the top; I'm using 'The Pythons' in the case, but gardening and DIY manuals are equally good candidates. Fine tuning can be done with Asimov, Van Vogt, Niven, or Simak. You may be tempted to use Ian Livingstone and Steve Jackson, but ...


10

If you don't have a lot of material to remove, you could use a belt or palm sander to gently sand it down. Be very careful not to press too hard so you don't damage the wood, if you take your time it should work just fine. If you have to remove a bit more material you could use a circular saw, just make sure you get a saw blade with lots of teeth. For ...


10

I don't think there is specific universal height as people aren't manufactured in a specific universal height. Googling for "workbench height" returns many results asking the same thing: what is the best height for a workbench. This page suggests the following method: A good rule of thumb is to make the workbench table the same height as the distance ...


9

The velcro type product you posted looks like it has adhesive on both sides. The velcro itself would probably be plenty strong if the straps are large enough, but I suspect that adhesive on the wall would not work out well. It could fail too easily by simply ripping the top layer of paint off. Or, when you do want to move you are going to rip a big chunk ...


9

A more typical way to strengthen a miter joint is to use either splines or biscuits. Splines can be oriented in one of two ways. It's probably easier to show pictures than to explain in words: a) Spline running the entire miter. With this method you can also make the grooves stopped so the spline would not be visible at the edges. If you are working ...


9

There's no real answer to this - it depends on how tall you are, what you are using the bench for and if you are standing or sitting (and then, are you using a chair or stool?). The use for it might also play a role. Things like electrical soldering work require you to be a lot closer to the project then wood working. The simple solution to this is to ...


9

There is a large body of information about what size furniture and tools should be. The field concerning sizing furniture to individuals and populations is called Anthropometrics and information about safety and ease of use is called Ergonomics. If you are building your own workbench for your own use, then you should size it to yourself unless you expect ...


8

I just had another random thought on this ... hollow door blanks. Yes, it's thicker, and you'd have to get them just the right length, as you can't trim 'em down too much, but the construction would make it quite stiff ... it's actually similar to the honeycomb idea ... the honeycomb isn't to give strength, it's to make sure that the top and bottom layer ...


8

You could try a plywood shelf with a run of EMT or other rigid pipe underneath. Hang the pipe with some closet flanges, and then lay the shelf on top of those. To cover it up, you could paint the pipe, and cover the front of the shelf with a face frame.


8

You want strong and cheap and light and thin? You're asking for a lot. You can get lighter by making a laminated shelf with honeycomb in between ... but it won't be that cheap, or all that thin. You can get cheap and light by adding a couple of stringers along the bottom as stiffeners, but it won't be all that thin. You could use something other than ...


8

I bet you could eliminate a lot of the engineering and fabrication work in making something like this by making a desk that has only two positions, standing and sitting, vs. trying to make one that's continuously adjustable anywhere between its highest and lowest setting. I'm thinking of something using a four-bar linkage on each end of the desk to keep the ...


8

I fixed my metal bedframe by putting leather patches between parts that are rubbing. Wooden frame is a bit more tricky - not so easy to identify where the parts are rubbing, but this is the first initial step. I'd say check all the joints and see if you can tighten the bolts or add glue to moving parts. Basically, the noise comes from parts rubbing on each ...


8

Although similar to the tooth pick trick, a real good and solid fix it to drill out the stripped hole to a size 1/32 inch smaller than a piece of hardwood dowel. Apply a good wood glue to the dowel and tap it into the clean drilled out hole. After the glue has dried, flush cut and sand the dowel smooth to the wood surface. Now drill a small pilot hole and ...


8

Dowels are probably your best bet for this fix because the tool cost is much lower for the case that you need to purchase tools to do this repair. The cost of a doweling jig is much lower than a biscuit cutter. Drilling the dowel holes is easily accomplished with an electric drill. If you end up with just a one inch wide repair strip added in then I would ...


8

Bolts going into a slieve like RedGrittyBrick suggested is the best answer for appearance and strength. Another option for speed and simplicity are Tapcon screws: No affiliation, and no direct experience, I'm just aware of the existence of this product.


7

Simple solution. Materials: Plywood sheet. Quilt batting, Upholstery foam, or similar. Fabric. Fabric glue. [Optional] Buttons and heavy thread. Procedure: Cut a sheet of plywood to the proper size. You'll want it to start below where it will bolt to the bed frame (about an inch or so), and extend to your desired height above the bed. and you'll want ...


7

You would need to mount wooden strips along the walls that screw into the studs. Then the desktop sits on top of those strips and is fastened from the underside to the strips. To achieve a more sleek look you could also consider the use of some lengths of aluminum angle iron that is screwed into the studs and into the bottom side of the desk surface. ...


6

If you don't want to use electric tools, you could wrap sandpaper around a block of wood or a sponge and try to sand the top down so that it fits. If this is to be a permanent installation, you could also try to remove part of the ceiling. If it is drywall it will probably possible to cut with a razer knife. If it's plaster, you are probably better off ...


6

Put shelf boards on horizontal rods of steel which are set into drilled holes in the wall, with the rods perpendicular to the length of the shelf. Grooves may be cut in the bottom of the boards to fixate them on the rods. Depending on the thickness of the boards, you may even be able to hide the rods. Yay! Magic Shelf! This will only work if your wall is ...


6

There are a number of online calculators related to the problem in the answers & comments to an earlier question about building shelves: What are cheap ways to build strong shelves with a large span? References included: The Sagulator (sag calculator for different types of wood & related materials) Elastic Beam Deflection Calculator (can handle ...


6

Lateral support is probably very important. Over time your bolts will not grip as strongly, and the legs will start to wiggle. Bracing the legs to each other or to the top of the bed will counter this rotational tendency. You'll need to fasten each leg at two points to make this work right, so you might consider the following options for securing each leg to ...


6

I have read that an iron can help lift those water marks off the table. If I remember correctly... Lay a dry cloth over the mark Heat the iron with the steam turned off Briefly iron the spot, gradually increasing the length of time you apply the heat I haven't tried it myself, so try it at your own risk.


6

This sounds like a bad plan. 550 pounds (or more, likely) is just way too much weight to try to hack something together. Even if you put a support in the middle, then you need to make sure it's perfectly balanced or you're going to crack the aquarium at the pivot point — the glass tank is going to be very unforgiving of an uneven surface. Plus, think of ...


6

As Chris Cudmore states in his comment, it is most likely a leveling issue (the other, but less likely cause could be misaligned hinges). Place a level across the top of the front of the unit. Note whether it is level or not. Then do the same across the top of one of the sides. If the unit is tipped, but only front to back (the front test was level), you ...



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