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Similar to Mazura's second answer, the Ductwork from the from the return can and should be really long. If you have the room where the ductwork for the return is, make it really long and zigzag it. Mine could be a Direct shot of 10', though I think they installed over 30' of ductwork and it curves all around the place. You can detach it from either end, ...


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Fiberglass Duct Liner: (industrialinsulation.com) Fiberglass duct liner is designed to be installed inside sheet metal ductwork and plenums. Fiberglass duct liner absorbs noise and contributes to indoor comfort by lowering heat loss or gain through duct walls. Or if you have the space for it, build some baffles out of 2x4' acoustic ceiling tiles ...


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Probably. You'd have to inquire of the furnace maker if it is or is not. Speculating, since we have no information about what make or model furnace you have, it probably runs the burner until the heat exchanger is too hot, shuts off the burner until it's too cold, and starts it again. Very few furnaces have any ability to modulate the flame, so it's either ...


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Maybe. It depends on your climate, comfort range, and behavior. You may be able to get away without supplemental heat sources if you can tolerate temperatures 10ºF or more above or below the setpoint and if you keep the bedroom doors open most of the time. Are you planning on installing an HRV or ERV? If so, that will help with mixing. Cooling can be more ...


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You've asked several questions here. Checking if it's 24V AC First of all, by far the vast majority of furnaces use 24VAC for control wiring. However, it's always better to be sure rather than make assumptions, so there are several ways to do this: Look at the spec sheet or manual for your model Look for labels on the control board, probably where the ...


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I have a lab at work right next to water heaters and air conditioning unit. I got the space for free and the "good" space is production stuff. I have not even thought about the units until your question, and will soon forget about them. They mean nothing. Pretty much there are three things to worry about. Temperature, humidity, and drastic changes in ...


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I think that no matter where you put those servers, whether in a storage room or near to your actual computers, you should really do something about the heat generated. There are proper cooling systems that you should have in place to make sure that your electronic bits are kept cool and don't overheat.


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It can be tested with a volt/ohm meter this most likely has a board on it if so the limit switch serves one purpose to turn of gas valve when the unit gets to hot to keep it from over heating. It would have to be a old fan limit switch to turn blower of coz is should always be the last thing to shut down. They only use 24 vac on furnance that would be in ...


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The 40,000 BTU furnace is almost certainly sufficient. It doesn't take a gigantic amount of heat to heat an 1100 square foot house, even if the house is relatively poorly-insulated. If your goal is to improve your house's thermal envelope with more insulation and better windows, a 40,000 BTU furnace may even be oversized once you're done. To make sure, do a ...


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You did not give enough information (see my comment). But here is a guess for you anyway: 5 PSI is equivalent to 11.5feet of water. To me that means your radiators are filled to that height above the gauge and no more. (i.e. if the boiler is in the basement probably only the bottom of the radiator has water.) So no wonder they are cold - there is no water ...


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What is happening, you have diagnosed correctly, in my opinion. How to fix it, not so well. The standard projection for chimneys from roofs is "2 feet above any part of the roof within 10 feet", or in this case, 2 feet above the ridge. You need to extend the "actual chimney" to meet this (IMHO) not cut down the sleeve to meet the "too short chimney." The ...


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Your A/C unit on the roof should only start running if it's heat pump, and it definitely shouldn't be running at the same time as the gas furnace. I'll take a guess that your thermostat is wired incorrectly, and it's running the air conditioner and furnace at the same time.


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According to the installation instructions in your link, the Honeywell CT87A requires only two or three wires (R,W,[Y]) to operate. The Nest compatibility checker shows that a system using those wires is compatible. You should be good to go.


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Which blower? If it is the flue blower, that is managed by the electronic controller. Cycling power (by flipping off the circuit breaker for a few seconds) to reset the logic is worth a try. Otherwise, there is a fault in the electronics which is probably best fixed by replacing the control board. If it is the ventilation blower, first check the room ...



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