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1

Unfortunately, the Aquastat you're using does not expose a C terminal. The transformer is likely soldered directly to the board; so unless you're good with a solder gun, you're going to have to buy a different thermostat. The red wire attached to the T terminal, should be connected to the R terminal of the thermostat. The white wire attached to the T ...


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If those red and white wires are wired correctly, the +24v 'R' terminal should be the red wire in the upper right, that is under the 'T' screw. Do NOT mess with either of the (12g) wires in the upper left, under the L1 and L2 terminals. Shut the power off to the unit before you go poking around in there. The C terminal you're after does not seem to be user ...


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There is a chemical added to natural gas (ethyl mercaptan) so you can smell leaks. However, this chemical burns, otherwise you would smell it when using a gas stove -- so it will not warn you of a leak after combustion, which is where the Carbon Monoxide (CO) hazard exists. You should probably inform company B, and your home warranty company, that their ...


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I would check your ignition sensor or your flame sensor. There are also heat switches that "melt" and shut off to stop the furnace from catching fire. I had a similar problem when I bought my house that was a foreclosure. The furnace sat for a while and the sensor got covered in dust and burnt out when I turned the heat on. The best way to figure out what's ...


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Yours may be different, but generally high temp limit switches look like this: Order the correct replacement online (if you can figure out the right one to get and have verified it has failed by testing for broken continuity) or take it to your local appliance parts supplier. Bring the model number of your unit with. "well 4 blinks is an open limit or ...


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There should be no problem connecting the C wire from your thermostat to the C terminal in the furnace. Take a look at this diagram, which is a rough approximation of your system. Notice the cable going to the condensing unit has a red wire connected to the Y terminal in the furnace, and a white wire attached to the C terminal. When the thermostat calls ...


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You have a bad high limit switch, or the furnace is overheated. The high limit switch is in place to make sure the furnace doesn't heat up to the point that it damages itself, or anything around it. If the furnace gets too hot, the limit switch opens. When the switch opens the burners turn off, but the blower continues to run in an attempt to clear the heat. ...


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The air filter should slide in the slot between the return air duct, and the furnace. The filter should have some markings on it, to indicate which way the air should flow through it. Make sure when you install it, you install it in the proper direction. Supporting Documentation The installation instructions shows the location of an optional external ...


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It looks like you're out of luck. It appears that the transformer is inside the hydrostat, and it doesn't expose a C terminal. You could contact the manufacturer, and ask them if there's a workaround. Based on the documentation, there's no obvious way to connect a WiFi thermostat to the system.


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You could tandem a thermostat upstairs, but you will always be wasting heat downstairs. The proper solution is two furnaces or space heaters upstairs. I have a separate zone upstairs with a thermostat, but because we mostly only use one room up there I heat that room with a space heater.


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While those answers may apply to some degree, I know the plate does create a restriction, which causes a slight vacuum in the blower section. This vacuum is used on some furnaces to actuate the diaphragm pressure/vacuum safety switch. If you have a diaphragm switch hose leading from the blower housing, then you'll find the furnace will not start gas flow ...


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Does the ratio of static pressures between two stories differ at different blower speeds? That's a very interesting question, but I believe it's a moot point. Any dramatic difference would mean your system isn't balanced correctly in the first place. (needs zoning, split systems, or an actual balancing) Stack effect will cause plenty of heat to go upstairs, ...


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If the vents are blowing the room temperature air weakly, then it sounds like there may be a duct disconnected somewhere that's blowing most of the hot air somewhere that's not useful (into a corner of the basement, into an unconditioned attic, etc). I'd trace the duct path from the furnace to a register and see if you can see where any disconnections might ...



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