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1

That's not the problem. The zone valve is not working. Zone valves stick either in the open or closed positions when they go bad. In your case bc heat won't go off its stuck in the open position. Need to replace zone valve


0

Here's how sizing/capacity work from a system design standpoint. This is the standard but I see a lot of cases where it either wasn't done or wasn't done properly. Ductwork first. If it's a new construction job, then the ductwork is designed to provide enough airflow to the areas that need it. If we're replacing a furnace, then usually the ductwork in ...


2

This is an edited answer After reviewing the additional information provided above along with relevant information obtained from this post: What is wrong with my gas furnace? I have entered my answer below. The "something red hot" in your furnace is apparently a "hot surface ignitor". The red hot glow is produced by passing current through the ignitor and ...


1

Unless there is a valve in the line that's shut off, you probably either have an air blockage (which either means you need to find a bleeder you haven't yet, possibly hidden under the baseboard cover, or you need to cut the pipe and add one) or you have a frozen pipe (surprisingly common with the way some baseboard systems are installed, especially in older ...


0

As a general rule, if the device has two wires that are indistinguishable, it won't matter. Where there's some physical reason in the construction to differentiate between "hot" and "neutral" on the wiring, the distinction is made - and sometimes it's made on things where it really doesn't matter to keep questions like this from arising. But it's ...


2

I have a Lennox too and I hate the filter situation with a fury of 1000 suns: It's just sitting in the furnace against the return duct - previous owner left a VERY dirty one taped with aluminum tape that took me a long time to peel. I've been using masking tape. One of these days I'll find time to fabricate a filter box to sit between the return duct and ...


0

It's more likely to short cycle from over-heating due to insufficient airflow. Overheating will contribute to premature over-temp limit switch failure. Short cycling puts a little more hurt on everything that has to start and stop. I wouldn't worry unless you notice it acting funny; cannot reach set temp, continually starts and stops (keeps reigniting) ...


0

You certainly could have someone come out and rebalance your furnace ducts to compensate for the lower airflow. However, if you in the (very common) position of thinking that closing off ducts "strains your furnace blower" you happen to have it exactly backwards (and you have lots of company) - closing off ducts in fact reduces the load on your furnace ...


1

Modern residential systems frequently have the filter located at the return-air grill. Look for the large grill where blower air is pulled in from the house; if the grill has small latches and hinge tabs, where it can swing open, it is probably designed to have a slim furnace filter installed behind the grill.


0

I'm not sure where you got the idea that your furnace will self-destruct if you don't run it as much, but it's not going to. Unless the second unit is insulated, you'll probably just end up heating it anyways.


0

Yes it would be possible to install a filter. You would need some sheet metal and know-how, or you might get lucky and find something pre-made. A qualified HVAC technician could make one easily. You might also consider getting your ducts cleaned to help reduce the dust.


0

Obvious possible issues are: -- your circulator pump isn't working (and the heat can't get out of the furnace) -- Your aquastat in the furnace is set too low -- this would cause the furnace to fire until it reached the water temperature listed, but the house would still be calling for more heat.


3

I'm going to suspect poorly insulated ducts running in unconditioned space as a first guess. I don't know the layout of your system, but it's very common to take duct runs up into the attic, and even if they are wrapped with duct wrap (R3-5 typically) that's abysmal. If the ducts are poorly wrapped or not wrapped in spots, it gets worse. R-50+ is far more ...


2

There should be a nameplate on the unit, which among other things will list the expected temperature rise across the heat exchanger. This value tells you how much the furnace should be expected to raise the temperature of the incoming air. Furnaces do not put out an exact temperature air, the outlet air temperature is always based on the inlet air ...


1

Most blower motors are 3 or 5 speed motors, though it varies by manufacturer. Typically they come with heat set to use LOW, cool and fan set to use HIGH. If it's a 3 speed motor, the HVAC tech is limited to only adjust to MED. Whereas if it's a 5 speed, the HVAC tech has more flexibility. In most cases the factory settings are adequate.


0

Interesting problem, I encountered something similar and will relate it as it might be something to look into: The client complaint was intermittent shutdown of gas burner and pilot, requiring the client to re-light the pilot light. I discovered that, occasionally, when the thermostat called for the gas valve to open gas to the main burner, the pilot flame ...


0

Based upon the description, the hazard of asbestos has been present on the property for many years and most likely through multiple owners. To date the current owner has not moved to mitigate the hazard, either through ignorance of its presence or due to disregard for the potential harm that may result. As renters, the meaningful options are really: ...


2

First ensure the guy doing the inspection is actually licensed; it's not uncommon for someone to go around with an invalid or expired license and basically committing fraud. Make a call to the agency who manages the license to double check. You may be able to find a list online of everyone who has a license in your area. Besides the issues you mention there ...


2

No warranty is generally provided. A record of inspection is provided, with notes about what was checked and the readings that were recorded at the end of the adjustment procedure. If you have been (as it would appear) in the habit of adjusting your furnace yourself, the fact that a licensed and insured service technician has looked at it in no way protects ...


0

Most furnaces; yours included it appears, do not change the speed of the motor during normal operation. The motor typically has three or more speeds (high, medium, and low), and is hard wired to use different speeds based on what mode the furnace is in. For example, in heating mode most blowers run at low or medium speed. While in fan or A/C mode, they ...


1

If you're tripping the high limit, then I'd say it's not back to normal. Sounds like you're not pushing enough cool air through the heat exchanger, which means it can't dissipate the heat fast enough. With a conventional gas furnace, you should be at about 140°F-170°F at the supply plenum. A high efficiency furnace will be lower, around 110°F-140°F. ...


-4

A single phase motor has a power factor. The formula for power of a single phase motor is voltage time current times power Cosine of the power factor. The power factor for a motor is determined by the manufacturer but I do not know what a typical power factor is for a single phase blower motor. If you can find this out and measure the voltage and the ...


0

Since in your case, one side of the transformer is grounded. You can simply use a fork or ring terminal, to connect the C wire to the chassis. Though it appears there's already a wire that's attached to ground, and comes right over near the thermostat wiring. I'd just put my C wire in with the other two wires, in that twist-on wire connector near the bottom ...



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