Hot answers tagged

15

I assume you are in a cold climate, like Minnesota (where I am). I will address your question in three parts; the first two have to do with the humidifier. The "winter" setting on the duct in your photo: It appears from the photo that the duct in question goes from your humidifier around to the return (intake) side of your furnace's ducting. This needs ...


12

This is quite possibly an emergency. Call your gas utility company and have them come check it out immediately. Also, open some windows to draw fresh air into your home, if you have a gas or exhaust leak it can be a fire and suffocation hazard.


12

That is a thermally fused switch. There is a fuse in there that will cut off the power if the temperature in the room rises above a certain temperture. The wheel is to replace the fuse when it blows. There's one on this page, Beckett 12501, not sure if it's the same as yours: http://www.beckettcorp.com/product2/productdetail.asp?detailid=66


11

It's not necessary, they probably just put it in because it was easy to do and gives you the option of heating the garage if you want. I would keep the vent closed, and if you want an even better seal, the make magnetic pads that you can put over the vent as well


10

There are various degrees of a "zoned" HVAC system. A simple zoned system will include motorized dampers in the ducts to direct air where it is needed. e.g. If one room is too cold, but the other ones are fine, the system will shut the dampers to the other rooms, and then fire up the heater so just the one room is heated. More sophisticated zoning systems ...


10

Insulate the pipes. You are likely losing a lot of heat into your basement if they aren't insulated. Unless your basement is finished (and therefore you want the heat there) you want to keep as much heat in those pipes as possible so that it gets into the main part of your house. The heater (and other similar equipment like hot water heater) should heat ...


10

Wiring Diagrams Locate the schematic In most cases, a wiring diagram can be located inside the HVAC unit. Typically, it will be on the inside of the access cover. Find the transformer on the schematic Once you've located the diagram, you'll want to look for this symbol. Or the actual text that says "Transformer", which may be labeling a crudely drawn ...


9

As far as I know, as long as the electric and gas lines don't actually touch, there's no more reason to be concerned about the gas and electric being 2 feet apart as there is 20 feet. If you have a gas leak from the furnace, the furnaces own ignition system (pilot light or electronic sparker) has as much chance of setting off a blast as the dryer.


9

Necessary? No. More efficient? Yes. When the HVAC is centrally located the warmer/cooler air has less overall distance to travel to cover the entire house, as it's radiating out from the center. If you have noticed that one side of your house is less comfortable than the other, it may be worth the relocation. If the house is generally comfortable year ...


9

Where to find the specifications Listed on the furnace Somewhere inside the service panel of the furnace, there should be a schematic for the furnace. This may list the electrical specifications of the blower motor. If not, the blower motor itself will have a label on it. It should list the voltage, amperage, horsepower, etc. Using an Ammeter An ...


9

Bleeding radiators is quite simple, and can usually be done by homeowners. All that's required is a radiator key, a towel and/or bowl, and a bit of time. Why Bleed Radiators Even with closed systems, air can still find its way into the system. When it does, it will collect at the highest points available (the top of radiators). Trapped air can cause ...


9

Okay, so I think I figured out the reason, and I learned a lot about HVAC in the process. The answer is that a ceiling fan is moving air at basically zero "static pressure." Static pressure in an HVAC context means the amount of resistance that the air has to moving. In a free environment, that's zero, or close to it, but in a tightly restricted system of ...


8

The concern that I know of is about the size of the pipe and all appliances that can be running at the other end. So if they ran out of a larger dimension pipe (or just had a lot of the smaller dimension) this would almost make sense. But I'd think any normal installer would try to minimize the parts cost and split it closer to the appliances. However, if ...


8

Some of the more advanced thermostats will track how often they are running. I have a Filtrete Wifi-Enabled Progammable Thermostat. It gives you a per-day total of how often the heat and A/C are run. You can also download an hour-by-hour export of the usage in CSV format. I am in no way affiliated with this company. It is simply a product I have ...


8

PVC is relatively inexpensive so the main cost is installing it. If your furnace is near an exterior wall, they'll simply make a hole in that wall and run the lines directly out. If your furnace isn't close to an exterior wall, then you need to run the lines through the ceiling, preferably in the direction of the joists, until you reach an exterior wall. If ...


8

The filter sits between the air return duct and the heat chamber, BEFORE the cool air enters the furnace. The air flow arrow almost certainly will point at the furnace, not away from it. If the filter sat after the furnace, there would be potential hazards associated with it, like possibility of fire (hot air hitting a cardboard frame) and release of nasty ...


8

For the ducts, the setting indicates where you should set the switch based on the season. If your house has separate air return ducts on different floors or even multiple ducts on the same floor, changing the setting changes which ducts pull air from the house, allowing lower ducts to suck cold air out in the winter and higher ducts to suck hot air out in ...


7

I have an ancient oil-fired steam boiler with a "tankless" hot water heater. I built an Arduino-based board that connects in parallel to the thermostat wires at the furnace. It uses a MID400 AC optocoupler to detect when the thermostat is calling for heat (24VAC when not calling for heat, 0VAC when it is), and then sends that to a computer via an XBee ...


7

While this won't specifically isolate your furnace from the rest of your energy usage, I'd recommend getting a Blue Line PowerCost Monitor (or the Black & Decker branded version, which is cheaper) their WiFi Gateway, and a free Microsoft Hohm account. Current Amazon links and prices: Black & Decker EM100B Energy Saver Series Power Monitor, $43.99 ...


7

As best I know, a fire rated utility room isn't required by any code for a single family structure. And for multi-family (e.g. condos), this requirement is to isolate each residence from each other and from common/utility areas. So the below advice is completely overkill. For the room itself, you can use fire rated drywall. This is usually 5/8" thick, and ...


7

Whether or not they remove the fill line, depends on how the tank is decommissioned. There are three ways an abandoned tank can be handled, as explained in this PDF The 1997 Uniform Fire Code, adapted by WAC 51- 44, requires that heating oil tanks out of service for a period of one year shall be decommissioned by using one of the following ...


7

WARNING: Furnaces are expensive, complex pieces of equipment. If you don't have the proper tools and/or knowledge, it's often best to let the professionals handle maintenance and repair. Gas Furnace Ignition Sequence: Thermostat calls for heat. Pilot gas valve opens. Ignition control starts (spark or glow). Pilot gas ignites. Flame sensor detects pilot ...


6

Any time you have heating ductwork in an unheated area, it is very wise to insulate it. There are several products, but I tend to go with the high density, foil backed fiberglass wrap most of the time. The exact type differs depending on the shape of the ductwork. (round vs rectangular) I always seal any seams in the insulation with foil tape. To solve the ...


6

As Tester101 mentioned (and he really should've made it an answer, because it's at least a partial one), the filter could restrict airflow to the point where your furnace overheats. Hence the 'Limit' error. But wait! Trying a cheaper filter, or running without a filter, isn't a good answer. You'll shortly find that the furnace won't run at all, with or ...


6

I have the same setup, and this appears to be the industry standard for high efficiency gas furnaces. What I have done is take a piece of plastic screen, and hose clamped it over the end due to a couple of 5 year old hooligans that run around my back yard and find such outlets very attractive for the experimental dropping of pebbles and other small items. ...


6

Is it expensive? Well that depends on your definition of "expensive", the amount of work you need to do, and who you get to do the work. 90% efficient furnaces require PVC venting directly outside, as opposed to using a chimney like the older 80% furnaces do. The extra expense is entirely dependent on how easy it is to route these pipes from your furnace to ...


6

Can you do this? ABSOLUTELY NOT!! Aside from (likely multiple) code violations you will never filter the lint out and will create a dangerous situation inside the furnace plenum, aside from clogging the furnace filter probably weekly.


5

It turns out the problem was that the zone valves were installed backwards. They closed in the opposite direction of the flow of water. Since the zone valves were fighting the flow of water, it was causing a great deal of vibration and banging. I had the heating company come back and reverse the zone valves so they operate in the correct direction. The ...


5

There should be zero difference in the safety between the least and most expensive furnace. The major differences will feature related. Any modern furnace purchased in the US meets the appropriate ASTM, NFPA, et al, specifications. More expensive furnaces will features like: Humidifers, multi zone heating ability, economizer, multiple heat exchangers for ...


5

Yes. I was building a new home in Baytown Texas (completed in 2006) and searched far and wide for thermostat controlled dampers - was told by many HVAC companies that "they" remove them weekly - this isn't true. I found one installer in Houston that would do the system the way I suggested - he listened and so did I. We compromised on 2 units with 3 ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible