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11

Here is a pretty quick explanation. Starting from where the water will enter the drain and ending where the water will flow out, dig a ditch that's about 10 inches deep and 6 inches wide. Keep in mind that you will need to dig deeper if your starting point slopes upward. Lay about 2 inches of rock into the trench before placing the pipe lengthwise ...


9

A power trencher, or Ditch Witch, is a fairly easy machine to use. Most are self propelled. You may check some local rental stores as well as HD, as you will probably need a trailer to transport the machine and most rental stores include it in the price. Before you attempt to use one of these monsters, be absolutely sure to call DIG SAFE @ 1800-digsafe. You ...


8

I don't think packing popcorn will work. I'd think it would compress and leave at best a spongy spot in your yard. Most likely you'll end up with it collapsing as soon as any weight is applied over it. The material shown in the two products you listed is a polystyrene aggregate. I don't think packing peanuts are the same exact material.


6

Here's another article about a French / Trench drain: Basically the same idea, except he doesn't recommend lining the ditch with fabric or putting a sock on the pipe. He does recommend using rigid perforated pipe instead of the corrugated pipe with slits in it.


5

Tim Carter at AskTheBuilder.com has a lot of articles on French/Trench drains. He likes solid pipe and I agree. You are correct in that the holes point DOWN. Here's why - the water won't magicially find the holes if they are pointed up, but if they are down, the water can fill the trench and then flow into the pipe. Put a cleanout on the upper end if you ...


4

In addition to @shirlock's answer: Gravel doesn't compact much. If you fill with soil to grade level today, in a year you'll have a shallow trench. Gravel supports the load of traffic, distributing and dispersing it, so your drain tile won't collapse. Gravel gathers water from a wider area, keeping things dryer. (Soil that doesn't percolate well will hold ...


3

Your basic plan sounds workable. I assume your crawl space is adjacent to a full basement area? I have a couple of questions. Where does the existing drain tile system empty? Is there a difference in level between existing basement floor and footings of the crawl space? the answers to these questions may change my answer to you. But basically, adding a ...


3

I assume you are talking about this. I have seen this product used twice before in this type of application.I have never used it in a french drain, however, I packed some into the end of a downspout so the water wouldn't drill a hole into the ground. I have also seen it used as a substitute for rock in a drainage ditch along the outside wall of a house. ...


2

For the first part, as it's in answer form: Many hardware stores that sell perforated pipe also sell filter fabric already made into a tube that neatly fits over the perforated pipe; if it's a warehouse store (not one where you get a ticket and then go out to a lumber yard), it'll likely be kept near the perforated pipe. As for the chance of clogging -- I ...


2

The best thing to do is not to have it drain under the patio -- when you change the moisure content of soil, it can compact differently, or wash out, both of which could cause the problems you're seeing. If you can, change the drain there so you're using non-perforated pipe, and run it out further to a drainage field past the bricked area. The problem is, ...


2

Concrete is an wonderfully easy product to shape. For your scenario, all you really need is make a form for the concrete that matches the concavity of your drain, and to set it in place when you place the concrete. It's not clear when you say curved if the drain itself curves along its length or if by curve you refer to the concave portion of the drain. ...


2

You could certainly perforate the lower section of the sump basin with small holes (1/4 inch/6mm or less would be my preference, but some might go twice/3 times as large - depends in part what you are bedding it in) Outside the basin, you'd want washed stone (depending on soil type, possibly filter fabric and washed stone) Inside the basin, a concrete ...


1

I had to draw a small diagram to see how the area was around the house. I drew a swale in to show what is there already, or hopefully something that can be created What looks troubling here is the concentration of runoff heading to the house IF there is no swale there, that is why I hope there is one there, if not you really need to get the flow away form ...


1

These materiasl will work. Lining the trench with landscape fabric and wrapping it over the top (of the rubble) will keep silt from clogging your drain. For higher volume flow, I'd add a perforated pipe at the bottom, but it's surely overkill for just a sink. Definitely make your rubble somewhat uniform, for best support for the overburden (assuming you ...


1

You should be able to use a corrugated tee/wye fitting such as the ones here: Lowes & Home Depot. The product description notes "adapts to fit 3 in. or 4 in. corrugated pipe and 4 in. PVC pipe".


1

There are 3 potential moisture issues: standing water leaking in via the wall/footer moisture migrating through the slab high humidity You need to first figure out which of those 3 is happening. If the water is leaking in, that's an issue of gutters, grading, draining, etc. That needs to be fixed on the outside, first. If moisture is migrating through ...


1

My first thought is that laminate flooring on top of concrete is seldom a good idea, especially if you're in an area where basements are common. There are ways to make it work, all of which require some subflooring and a waterproof membrane, but one of the cardinal rules of carpentry is that wood does not touch concrete, for exactly the reason you are ...


1

Sorry, I have to disagree to solid pipe. Regardless of what type of soils surround the trench, the back fill for the drain must be pea stone or gravel. If you use solid pipe, how is the water going to enter the pipe to be drained? Solid pipe would be fine for a floor drain etc, but by definition, a French drain is a continuous porous downhill drain. Use ...


1

If the French drain is between your basement slab and the exterior walls, it may be the source of most of your radon. Sounds like a small suction from the drain sump to the outside is a good plan. A small fan with its own exhaust pipe shouldn't be a problem for the water heater or furnace but a CO detector is never bad for closed rooms with gas appliances.



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