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11

Here is a pretty quick explanation. Starting from where the water will enter the drain and ending where the water will flow out, dig a ditch that's about 10 inches deep and 6 inches wide. Keep in mind that you will need to dig deeper if your starting point slopes upward. Lay about 2 inches of rock into the trench before placing the pipe lengthwise ...


9

A power trencher, or Ditch Witch, is a fairly easy machine to use. Most are self propelled. You may check some local rental stores as well as HD, as you will probably need a trailer to transport the machine and most rental stores include it in the price. Before you attempt to use one of these monsters, be absolutely sure to call DIG SAFE @ 1800-digsafe. You ...


8

I don't think packing popcorn will work. I'd think it would compress and leave at best a spongy spot in your yard. Most likely you'll end up with it collapsing as soon as any weight is applied over it. The material shown in the two products you listed is a polystyrene aggregate. I don't think packing peanuts are the same exact material.


8

Tim Carter at AskTheBuilder.com has a lot of articles on French/Trench drains. He likes solid pipe and I agree. You are correct in that the holes point DOWN. Here's why - the water won't magicially find the holes if they are pointed up, but if they are down, the water can fill the trench and then flow into the pipe. Put a cleanout on the upper end if you ...


6

Here's another article about a French / Trench drain: Basically the same idea, except he doesn't recommend lining the ditch with fabric or putting a sock on the pipe. He does recommend using rigid perforated pipe instead of the corrugated pipe with slits in it.


4

Use the solid pipe -- two feet of clay soil will be very heavy, especially when wet, and I can see the flexible pipe deforming as you fill in the trench, potentially causing a blockage in your nice new French drain.


4

In addition to @shirlock's answer: Gravel doesn't compact much. If you fill with soil to grade level today, in a year you'll have a shallow trench. Gravel supports the load of traffic, distributing and dispersing it, so your drain tile won't collapse. Gravel gathers water from a wider area, keeping things dryer. (Soil that doesn't percolate well will hold ...


4

I had to think about this one for a bit. The real reasons for a porous backfill are to easily track water, give depth to protect drain tile from freezing, and keep it in place so it won't float in the water. As long as those goals are met you should be fine.


3

Your basic plan sounds workable. I assume your crawl space is adjacent to a full basement area? I have a couple of questions. Where does the existing drain tile system empty? Is there a difference in level between existing basement floor and footings of the crawl space? the answers to these questions may change my answer to you. But basically, adding a ...


3

I assume you are talking about this. I have seen this product used twice before in this type of application.I have never used it in a french drain, however, I packed some into the end of a downspout so the water wouldn't drill a hole into the ground. I have also seen it used as a substitute for rock in a drainage ditch along the outside wall of a house. ...


3

Well, a (concrete slab) floor is just a floor, supported by its substrate. You may have some subsidence afterwards, so I'd advise my tips here, especially the one about undermining it a little to lock it all in place once you re-pour. Rebar is a must. Done right*, I have no concern for the foundation. I'd be worried that there's a pocket under the slab ...


3

I'd consider fiber cement trim board. Almost all of it is Class 1 (A) fire rated, it's easy to find at the big box stores in a variety of dimensions, and it will most likely pass for baseboard if it's thicker than the "plasterboard or decently-thick plywood".


2

I rented a trencher at Home Depot that had a large wheel with teeth. Simpler than the ones you've shown. I only needed a 1" wide trench for 3/4" PVC pipe. I found it very easy to use.


2

For the first part, as it's in answer form: Many hardware stores that sell perforated pipe also sell filter fabric already made into a tube that neatly fits over the perforated pipe; if it's a warehouse store (not one where you get a ticket and then go out to a lumber yard), it'll likely be kept near the perforated pipe. As for the chance of clogging -- I ...


2

The best thing to do is not to have it drain under the patio -- when you change the moisure content of soil, it can compact differently, or wash out, both of which could cause the problems you're seeing. If you can, change the drain there so you're using non-perforated pipe, and run it out further to a drainage field past the bricked area. The problem is, ...


2

If the French drain is between your basement slab and the exterior walls, it may be the source of most of your radon. Sounds like a small suction from the drain sump to the outside is a good plan. A small fan with its own exhaust pipe shouldn't be a problem for the water heater or furnace but a CO detector is never bad for closed rooms with gas appliances.


2

Concrete is an wonderfully easy product to shape. For your scenario, all you really need is make a form for the concrete that matches the concavity of your drain, and to set it in place when you place the concrete. It's not clear when you say curved if the drain itself curves along its length or if by curve you refer to the concave portion of the drain. ...


2

You could certainly perforate the lower section of the sump basin with small holes (1/4 inch/6mm or less would be my preference, but some might go twice/3 times as large - depends in part what you are bedding it in) Outside the basin, you'd want washed stone (depending on soil type, possibly filter fabric and washed stone) Inside the basin, a concrete ...


1

Depending on the area , and your costs, you could also just buy a prefabricated french drain and save yourself some times. Your BIG local hardware store would have something like this:


1

I believe it will fill in. My house had a 4" PVC pipe from the foundation to the septic tank, about 10 to 15 feet away. Apparently, a plumber was out probing for the pipe with a steel rod (standard tool for this), and pierced the pipe without realizing it. The pipe eventually filled in, and I had a whole lot of digging to do to fix it.


1

Possible? Yes. But I wouldn't be out here doing it as I like my back too much. A walk behind blade or skid steer would be the fast option. If you're committed to doing it by hand, find some nearby teens and pay them to help. There is always a surprising amount of dirt with a project like this - be sure you have a plan for what to do with it all.


1

No. I have not personally used any of the trenchers listed at that rental store. There a variety of trenchers available for rent. Many of the Home Depot stores will rent a smaller Barreto 18" trencher that, depending on local code, can accomplish much of what the homeowner may need done (irrigation systems etc). However, if you want to trench deeper ...


1

Admittedly guesswork, but... I would expect that, over time, the flagstones would settle into the gravel and mostly stabilize themselves (outside of frost heave and similar issues). There still could be tripping hazards, though, just as there can be with bricks after frost heave and tree roots lift them... Note that the french drain doesn't have to be ...


1

The water table around my house is very high with a lot of surface water due to clay subsoil. My experience of 25 years in my current house (boat?) is adding a french drain around the house is a patch to a larger yard grading problem. I've done this and eventually they clog and need maintenance. Over time I've regraded most of my yard so water flows away ...


1

Given the willingness to devote time and energy to the project, sure you can regrade it, but looking at the photographs it may not solve the root problem. It appears that water will sheet flow down the driveway and directly into the building...that's why the drain is there. The presence of the french drain suggests that the problem predates the gravel ...


1

The problem with this approach is that using a sewer auger in the corrugated drain can actually damage the soft plastic drain tile. The cutting edges on the auger can tear into the pipe and then allow the collapse of the drain. The corrugated pipe is used because it is cheap and quick to install. Solid PVC pipe with holes is a better choice if you want to be ...


1

It would depend on soil type and the load on the foundation. As a very rough rule of thumb, the soil actively supporting a foundation spreads at a 45 degree angle downwards from the outer lower edges of the foundation. You should be able to dig outside this section with impunity. If you encroach upon it, if you only excavate something like 15 foot sections ...


1

I had to draw a small diagram to see how the area was around the house. I drew a swale in to show what is there already, or hopefully something that can be created What looks troubling here is the concentration of runoff heading to the house IF there is no swale there, that is why I hope there is one there, if not you really need to get the flow away form ...


1

You should be able to use a corrugated tee/wye fitting such as the ones here: Lowes & Home Depot. The product description notes "adapts to fit 3 in. or 4 in. corrugated pipe and 4 in. PVC pipe".



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