New answers tagged

0

I don't see why your idea would not work. Yes, you will need to remove the siding where your ledger attaches. You will have several important considerations: water intrusion at ledger board location. You will need to ensure that area is properly flashed and sealed, and try not to damage the waterproof membrane under your existing siding. roof slope and ...


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This is how it ended up. Hope it speaks for itself and thanks to everyone for their input.


3

It's hard to provide a "straight answer" with the information given. Bearing wall vs. gable wall, rambler vs. two-story. Window position and wall height. There are many factors. I can tell you that triple-member headers are not common except where limited height is available. We built nearly all our exterior headers with doubled 2x10s in a U configuration, ...


0

Exterior walls are load bearing walls. You can place a header over jack studs to bridge the overhead load to the bottom but for that to work properly the jack studs do need to go all the way down to the lower plate.


0

It sounds like you need to support the 2x6 or 2x8 from below with a load bearing wall or beam. If you will be walking around up there, then you should build it like floor not a shelf. Nailing floor joists to the ceiling trusses would probably be slightly less optimal than not nailing them together because flexibility of the joist is part of the strength, but ...


2

First you need to determine the weight of the items you plan to store. If the trusses were designed under the IBC/IRC or the UBC (and maybe the BOCA and SBCCI) codes, then they should of been designed with a 10 psf live load on the bottom chord. If you keep below this loading you should be okay, but you might want to check out the code requirements for your ...


6

Aside from electrical and plumbing interference, you can do pretty much whatever you want with the framing. That wall is mostly decorative (it saved some money by not requiring the cabinet makers to finish the backs of the cabinets). If you have smooth walls, open the drywall enough to work. Frame in your opening, replace the drywall, add corner bead or ...


1

I would probably still use wood for the beam across the bed opening because it is so much easier to work with. The picture you posted shows a good 6 to 7 inches of space from the platform surface down to the top of the bed opening. This should be more than enough room for beams that can carry the weight. If your current plan is only allowing for a 3" beam ...


1

You are correct. Framing a wall or floor the two outer studs or joists are moved in to compensate for the end of the interval. If you are going for an exact dimension divisible by 4'. This makes placing 4'x8' sheets of OSB come out nice and even with no waste. Good luck!


-1

They are called rafter ties. Rafter ties are needed for resist tension when ceiling joists are perpendicular to the rafters. You may be able to take them out if your ceiling joists are parallel to the rafters.


5

You have a complicated question here and the best (and most legally-correct) answer will probably come from talking to your local building inspector. Preferably before a lot of work has already been done... First, the question of which building code is even applicable is not clear to me. The International Residential Code ("IRC") only applies for 1- and ...


3

According to Table R602.3(1) of the International residential code (IRC), you have to use two 16d (3 1/2" x 0.135") fasteners to end nail the top or sole plate to a stud. If the studs were toe nailed to the sole plate, then either three 8d (2 1/2" x 0.133") or two 16d (3 1/2" x 0.135") fasteners would be required. International Residential Code 2012 ...


0

There's no problem whatsoever with angling your framing gun nails slightly to face nail through the studs and into the ends of the blocks. Do this if you prefer the blocking to be on a single line for sheathing seams or whatever. Otherwise, stagger them on a centerline as Ben Welborn suggests and again face nail them with the framing gun.


0

Use the full size nail gun. Cut the blocks so they fit tight, get them into a spot where they're about 1/4 inch from where you want to be, and toenail through about 1 1/2 inches of the block into the stud. Support the other side of the block with the handle of your hammer if you have problems with them moving too much.


0

Since you have a palm nailer, use that. However, I think it is worth mentioning that in lieu of a palm nailer, an electric screw driver, (which is more commonly owned by DIY folks than a nail gun), is easier to use in this situation than a regular hammer and nails. Oh, and the way to nail them in is to stagger the blocks. Edit: Please excuse me; for ...



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