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I have used wet rags / towels and a heat gun if I take two long in making bent wood "butcher block" counter tops. With bad 2x4" I will use them in shorter pieces for fire blocks (ok now 2x6) or find other uses because if not dried straight they may twist again if only anchored at top and bottom in a wall. If you have a large number I did see 1 contractor ...


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If the 2x4 is not too twisted, then you can probably just use a clamp or a block. Start by fastening one end of the stud in place, and then use one nail to fasten the other end. The nail should be placed such that one of the edges of the stud is centered (as it should be). The other edge (lets call it edge B) will not be on center until a clamp or block is ...


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The tree will generally grow larger in diameter centered around the existing trunk....at least for the foreseeable future. Larger / older trees may at times grow out more to one side versus another but the factors that cause them to do that are probably complex and may have more to do with how the canopy of the tree develops or how the tree gets damaged or ...


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You're going to want to remove the trim joist, and let the new joists rest on the support beam. The other end of the joists will rest on whatever new support structure you add.


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The purpose of a ledger board is to give you surface onto which you can nail/attach the rest of the deck (and flashing to keep water out of a house- usually). Your question is, do you need it for attaching two decks. I think the answer to this is a decision for personal convenience, tools, or need. I personally don't undersand the use of a ledger board here ...


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Think of it like 1) taller joists, or 2) the second level of a house (without the added load of a second floor). There's no reason why the load from the upper level can't be transferred through the lower level to the footings. As to size, the upper deck can be as large as the lower deck, and if there's no cantilever on the lower deck the upper can extend ...


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Not sure what you are asking, but the footings supporting the deck structure are in the ground under the posts that hold up the beams. Footing size, post size, beam size, joist size are all engineered to support the weight of the structure,and any distances spanned. If you look at some of the other photos on the website they show posts under the outer edge ...


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I think you have misinterpreted the picture in your posting. The OSB is not really on the "inside" of the soffit. Instead that part of the soffit in the picture was constructed using some I beam structural members that are made with OSB material notched into upper and lower 2x4s (or possibly a 2x3s). The fact that they show the flat 2x4 over the splice ...


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Putting the sheathing to the outside makes hitting backing easier when hanging drywall, etc. On the other hand, it may be easier to hang the verticals pre-assembled if the sheathing is to the inside, as you can then screw through the 2-by into the joists unobstructed. From a structural standpoint it does the job equally well inside or outside. Do whatever ...


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I generally agree with Ed Beal regarding lumber quality. My personal standards wouldn't allow use of such lumber. Regarding your question... For field studs, as little as half an inch should be fine. Much smaller than that and the sheet will begin to deform around the sharpened edge of the lumber when the screws are set, causing waves in the wall and ...


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"Wane" is the area on a edge of a board where the bark may have been but flaked so the edge is not a full flat surface. In today's high recovery saw mills the lower grades may have wane on all 4 sides of a 4x4" because the tree top was not much larger than that. Not all lumber is safe for building it should have a stamp on it stating the grade. In my state ...


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I'm not sure if ipe is a great choice for this, but I think it deserves an honorable mention because I've never seen insects eating it. The trouble with it would be needing to predrill holes (because it's so hard), and it's a bit more expensive than oak. Regarding insect control, use borates. That's the only think that will really work out in the long run. ...


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you could always use hemlock. it holds up well outdoors and is strong as hell


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Solid Composite Decking (plastic) (source) I've no idea of its compressive strength, but I think it'd do just fine. It is expensive though.


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Go to a drywall and metal stud distributor and get some 3-5/8" 18ga track with a g90 coating. Might get a bit of surface rust over the years but it won't rot or be eaten by pest.


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There are many species of wood that are naturally insect and moisture resistant. Redwood comes to mind. People used this for decks long before pressure treated came along. Just install it as you would PT wood with a sill plate gasket. Good luck!


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I don't see why your idea would not work. Yes, you will need to remove the siding where your ledger attaches. You will have several important considerations: water intrusion at ledger board location. You will need to ensure that area is properly flashed and sealed, and try not to damage the waterproof membrane under your existing siding. roof slope and ...


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It's hard to provide a "straight answer" with the information given. Bearing wall vs. gable wall, rambler vs. two-story. Window position and wall height. There are many factors. I can tell you that triple-member headers are not common except where limited height is available. We built nearly all our exterior headers with doubled 2x10s in a U configuration, ...



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