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If this is a cold climate, keep in mind you will want insulation. Also need to consider issues of condensation or wicking. You will want a moisture and vapour barrier between any wood and concrete. Also consider foam insulation between metal and wood to avoid moisture from condensation when water vapour in the air meets cold metal. Other than that there ...


0

Using treated lumber, you can attach the framing using a combination of suitable adhesive and concrete anchors like tapcons. Consider, though, whether you'll have moisture issues between your plywood (or finished surface) and the concrete. How do you plan to seal and insulate, or do you?


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The reason why 2x4s are faced thin side out is: The other way would mean you would use a 2x2 base which would be too wobbly, even for non-loadbearing walls. The wide side is more prone to warping issues. Can you imagine trying to get plumbing/electric/whatever through the wall if it were framed like this. It is fine to have a board facing like this ...


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You have a few options. Frame around the beam. This is probably the easiest method, though it changes the dimensions of the room slightly. Simply build your wall either in front of, or behind the beam. Attach the top plate to the joists. Weld studs to the beam You could weld threaded, or non-threaded rods (studs) to the bottom of the beam. Then drill ...


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Notice that sill plate sitting on top of the beam? Held on with some nails hammered part of the way in, then bent over the flange? Do the same with your top plate. The sill plate has the advantage of gravity holding it in place, so you'll probably want to put more bent nails in, especially if you'll have kids down there playing who may be running into it. ...


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How easy this project is, will depend on the underlying framing. There's two ways these corners could have been framed. Side walls to the end This will make what you want to do fairly easy. Top down view of the framing End walls to the side This is the more likely of the two. Which means you'll either have to build out the corner, or lose 3 1/2" ...


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If you want to do it then you can do it! For professional results a cabinet builder will be the right person to give you ideas and an estimate. For DIY you could measure the clear opening height, width, and depth you will be left with once you remove the header and front returns (side walls) and research pre-built options that will fit. I am not a huge fan ...



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