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It sounds as though you are ready to remove the door to get past the problem, if so replace it with an outswing door. I am not really crazy about out swing doors, since they weather badly, if a nicely designed small roof is over it, it would hang in there better. You would not need to lower the base either.


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Another alternative is to build out one side of the wall that is away from the brace side. For example you could attach 2x2s to the edge of each stud to open up the wall cavity to another 1.5". This actually removes only a small amount of finished space in the room. If done all the way across one wall surface you would probably hardly realize that that one ...


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One thing you could look into would be flat oval ducting: You can get it as small as 3" in the smaller dimension, but it will likely be a lot harder to find and a lot more expensive. Also, it will compound the issue @iLikeDirt pointed out in keeping it clean, especially if you have transitions to round pipe anywhere. I would also limit yourself to one ...


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I definitely agree with iLikeDirt, but if you have no choice you can use oval duct such as this: http://www.deflecto.com/products/pc/Skinny-Duct-Aluminum-Dryer-Vent-br-4-Oval-Duct-Adjustable-27-48-4p445.htm If anything, as a safety precaution you should foil tape ALL joints and even elbows. I do this as standard even for exposed duct work. DO NOT use ...


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I wouldn't build it that way in the first place. Hiding a dryer duct within a wall and venting it through the roof (I'm guessing here, but that's what it looks like to me) is just begging for nobody to clean it until it eventually catches fire and burns the house down. I recently re-did my utility room and discovered an in-wall rigid steel duct just like ...


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I would knock that sucker out with impunity. If it is to serve some purpose, it most likely would not be code compliant. Fire blocking is the first thing that comes to mind, but it is only in one stud section.


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You are most likely referring to Cross bridging or blocking. They must be installed to keep the joists from twisting.


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It's quite easy to check that something is at a particular angle. Just put the appropriately sized block on your level at the appropriate distance, and make your level (with the block) level. Your off-level surface makes a right triangle with respect to an imaginary (or provided by your level) level surface. The level is the "adjacent" side of the angle, ...


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It's much easier to check that something is level than to check that something is 6 degrees or 1/4 inch higher. Build it level. Then add a 1/4 inch strip of wood (a length of lath or trim) across the inside edge of the horizontal framing member. You are correct that the sleeve will be sitting on two edges, the added trim strip and the outside edge of the ...


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At 23 feet, there is no way to build it with a continuous sill or plate. i would also assume in that 23 foot span there may be a few doors? The first step would be to lay a sill plate on the floor on a chalk line and secure it with framing nails or screws. Now you can lay out where your doors are going to live. If you really want to build the walls on the ...


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A continuous top and bottom plate are preferred, and longer 2x4 or 2x6's are available for this. If you need to breakup the wall, then make two separate walls and nail them together, to the floor, and with a staggered top plate. When possible, you want to end the wall near a corner to give the joint more support. Also try to stagger top plates near corners ...


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You need to box off that floor joist. You can remove an section of the joist in the way. You then build a box connecting the ends of the cut off joist to adjacent joists with perpendicular ties of the same dimensions of lumber. 2X10's for example. These ties transfer the load to the adjacent joists and give you an opening for plumbing or duct work.


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Not unless they are 2x12 floor joists and it goes exactly through the center. The maximum permissible boring in a floor joist is limited to 1/3 of the height of the joist (with a 2" minimum). See IBC 2308.8.2. Sistering the joists would not effect this restriction, as it is an issue of the structural integrity of the framing member - not an issue of the ...


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As a home inspector, I can tell you that sheer existence of those damaged joists are going to be a RED FLAG at any time you decide to sell and move on. If they are badly burned, they are not structurally sound and should be removed. Install a few temp supports on ends of adjacent joists, then remove and replace them one or two at a time. Use proper joist ...


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Fine if you leave them just consider covering burner or smoked wood with a kilz primer for no after smell or effects.


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Build a quick temp wall inside about 3' in so you got room to work. If the ceiling rafters don't bear weight on it just try and bridge over temp.wall to keep.things up. The temp wall is top and bottom plate and 2' centers with a stiff back 2x4 nailed a cross at center. Maybe a angle brace 2x4 0n the other. Put temp wall.in place and demo your wall. The wall ...


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The weight of the roof will be so little in that area, that if you have a fascia board, that will hold it together in a straight line for the short time while you are adding the header. If you have aluminum wrapped fascia, you will most likely have 2X material for a sub fascia, that's even better, unless it is a cover over an existing 1X fascia. Even if it ...


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Based on your description of the loading, I wouldn't be too concerned about supporting it at all unless you're going to leave the framing out for any significant period of time (days for example). If anything it might sag a fraction of an inch, but you'll true it up when the new header goes in. You'll want to remove the old one first and re-frame that ...



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