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From what I can see here, and assuming not a load-bearing situation, I'd do this: Remove the existing header. You may need to use a recipro saw to cut fasteners behind the plaster on the room side. Since you have access from the back side, run a new, full-width double 2x6 header. If you don't have trimmer studs or other support available, fasten the header ...


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If you look closely at the boards on the inside, you will see they are overlapping, the top edge being behind the bottom edge of the board above (behind when viewed from the outside). This is standard clapboard type construction (although many modern clapboards have a tapered upper edge and the overlap is much greater). Rain tends to drip off the lower edge ...


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I think you can do both, but framing walls on top of subfloor is less potentially less work. If you use a product like DriCore for the subfloor, they even explicitly recommend you frame on top of their subfloor product. They do, however, recommend you screw the framing through the subfloor into the concrete with something like 3" Tapcons spaced every 4 ft ...


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First, you'll want to place double studs on either side of your opening (currently you have some on the left but not right, as viewed from the kitchen). Then add horizontal members at the top and bottom of the opening, fastened into those studs. This will add a lot of rigidity by preventing the knee-wall studs from swinging left/right/out. Finally, add some ...


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With the "cable system", there are metal rods in the frame between windows that go the full height of the window and are tied into the frame. You connect a cable to an eye at the top of the window and run it back at an angle to the wall the window is installed in, above the window. The other end of the cable is fastened to a bolt that is securely fastened to ...


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Technically you're adding pin studs or trimmers under the header, and not kings, but yes. Insert the new trimmers before anything else and stand them vertical, then add the inner trimmers (assuming you want doubled studs for strength and trim backing). Move the trimmer pairs into position and toenail them to the header using either framing nails or ...


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Look like I found my own answer here: trex.com/trex/groups/content/documents/document/trex_004114.pdf as basically you could have 2.5 overhang and you can screw from bottom up at 45 degree angle. Interesting! If you the deck is totally not parallel and has more than 3 inches offset. I imagine the easy way to fix would be to "double" the trim joists with ...


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That brace is almost certainly not needed. Diagonal lumber braces are an outdated method from back when walls were sheathed with individual boards, and not with modern structural sheet goods. Also, modern, sheathed and engineered truss roofs provide substantial diagonal bracing where it didn't exist with hand-framed rafter and board roofs. You don't say what ...


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Besides safety and practicality mentioned by isherwood... part of the answer is money... the size of the hanger is related to the cost of the hanger. If you make or sell hangers in bulk, then every cent matters (customers like walmart and lowes will buy the hangers that are one cent cheaper per 100 boxes). If you only need to hold a certain weight, then ...


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Answer revised after realizing that the OP was asking specifically about top-mounted hangers. In the case of perlins, it's not usually a problem that they align slightly above the beam. Any subfloor or roofing should span that small gap without a problem. Why are the hangers not exactly 3-1/2" high inside? To give a slight margin for error with respect ...


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Simpson Strong Tie makes an "Adjustable Truss Hanger" THA-Series.


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Those are simple L-angle joist hangers. I'm not sure if it's appropriate to use them like that, though... especially if you plan to use the stringer to support something (other than itself). In other words, the ground-support should be directly supporting the stringer and the joists should be resting on the stringer- unless you will not be using the ...


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no - the LSU hangers sit over the end of a square cut joist or rafter. they wont work if you cut them on an angle.


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I think an easier solution is to not penetrate your current home. You have a system that works, so don't break it. I would: pour slab and use at least 8" posts for all four "corners. have the height of the post go about 2 feet higher than gutter. Run appropriate headers to carry roof load. Guessing these will be a good 9 feet in the air. the roof would ...


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It's not clear to me that you have enough height to attach the carport as you propose. Based on the garage door visible (probably 7' high) I think it will be very tight once you take into account the slope of the carport roof (1:6 if using shingles) and the depth of the carport roof rafters. But it may work. Also make sure you plan for the additional snow ...


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Those are not the correct nails, period. A "Box" nail is thinner than a "Common" nail, and unsuitable for framing. Per chart found here, 0.162" .vs. 0.135" which is 144% more steel in the common nail (review geometry if you don't get that.) Box nails, being thinner, are easier to bend, as well; but predrilling can help if you are not a skilled framer - ...


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For framing a deck where you cannot see the nails, an external product is desired. A galvanized framing nail will not rust where a standard framing nail will rust and potentially eventually fail. For areas you CAN see, I prefer screws, as they won't pull out and can be screwed flush. It may also be worth it to rent a compressor and framing nailer for a ...



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