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-1

No apologies needed. To determine the structural strength of that side of the house, get 50 pound bags of concrete and just keep adding them until something cracks or buckles. Then count the bags and fix the broken part of the house. So, for example, if it took 250 bags before it broke, then it means you can add an additional 12,500 pounds of dead weight. ...


2

If what you're saying is the tub will be on top of 2x10 at 16" on center spacing, with a span of 9 feet between bearing points that continue down to the foundation, you'll be fine. A drawing of the complex framing you seem to have would help out immensely. I still recommend doing the drawings and getting permits: I have a lot of experience framing houses, ...


0

Trus-Joist Corporation has an informative .pdf that addresses some of these problems. It's here: www.woodbywy.com/document/tb-821/ (I found this link by Googling the phrase 'I-joists as wall studs'.) One of the main problems I noticed in the document is securely attaching the studs to the floor. What they describe is to add stiffeners to the OSB web at the ...


2

The foam insulation itself is combustible, hence the requirement for a thermal barrier. According to the 2012 IRC: R316.4 Thermal barrier. Unless otherwise allowed in Section R316.5 or Section R316.6, foam plastic shall be separated from the interior of a building by an approved thermal barrier of minimum 1/2 inch (12.7 mm) gypsum wallboard or a ...


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Nobody uses fractions in the USA for small measurements, either. Typical machinist measurements are in thousandths or ten thousandths of an inch. ) Engineers and surveyors often use feet and tenth of a foot. Even carpenters don't always use standard fractional inches. A framing square has rules divided in 16ths, 8ths, 10ths, and 12ths. Use the most ...


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Is it possible to bolt a steel angle to the concrete with a short leg under the overhanging plate to support it? Difficult to diagnose without seeing and of course bolting a steel might look a 'pigs ear' depending on where it is and what the options are to 'hide' the steel. This is of course assuming that you don't want to shutter up and pour new concrete ...


1

Sometimes concrete just doesn't cooperate. I'd say up to an inch out of play is the carpenter's job to deal with. Two and a half inches! is possibly a problem for lawyers... Had the distance been fudged to one and a quarter inches on both sides, (harrumph) maybe that'd be OK... I'd be interested in what the permissible 'fudge factor' for sill plates ...


2

I would be concerned. Have the general contractor figure out who is out of specification and have them fix it. (My guess is that the concrete is to blame, but I'm not there with a measuring tape.) I strongly suggest that you don't let the house be built out of square. Among other things, it'll cost a bit more at just about every step.


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It might sound crazy, but you can order a window like you mentioned, although only about 1/2-1" smaller in height. Then place backer rod, round foam, in the gap as a filler, and finally caulk with high quality flexible exterior caulk, or mastic, and scrape the caulk with a putty knife to make it smooth to fill the uneven gap.



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