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Regardless of how the nail is being driven or at what bangle the bottom of the nail head should, at a minimum, be in contact with the framing member. A slightly counter sunk nail head will stand a better chance of working it's way loose due to wood movement. When using an air-nailer attached to a compressor there should be a depth setting which allow the ...


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Few people use 2-3/8" nails for framing with lumber. They're commonly used (in ring-shank form) for subfloors, sheathing boxes (think fireplace surrounds and soffits), and other light-duty uses. Just as that size isn't truly an 8d (eight-penny) nail, 3" framing nails aren't truly 16d. They're thinner and shorter than a traditional 16d sinker. For that ...


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So long as one side of the heads of the nails are touching the studs, there is no problem. These nails merely keep the stud from slipping to one side or the other, and nails angled in from each side will do the job with no difficulty, even thought he heads are not fully flush. If, for some reason, you had to drive a nail into the narrow edge of the stud ...


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Most framing nailers will accept a variety of nail lengths. For example, mine will take nails between 2" and 3.5" (6d to 16d equivalent) and from casual searching this seems to be fairly typical. That said, you'd be much better off screwing down the sub-floor with decking screws. It's a little bit more work, but you won't have to worry about the nails ...


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End nailing into the brace will not be a useful and strong joint. Instead do something like the following where the brace is made of 2x lumber. Notch it as shown and set on edge and toe nailed from each side. Much stronger.


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Blocking is required wherever a fire or draft can pass from horizontal plane to a vertical plane or vice versa. In otherwords, where the wall meets the floor and the floor meets a ceiling. If fire can pass through one section and travel to another, it needs to be blocked. The 2012 IRC code says that a 16" section of fiberglass insulation will suffice as ...


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In all the nail sizes specified in the charts, 10D (3") nails are also an option. In the building trade, that is the size pretty much used everywhere when it comes to nailing up framing in anyplace. In answer to the 8D question, 4 nails will easily fit into the bottom of a 2X4, yes they will cross each other, but only in the plate where the split resistance ...


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I have no idea what you are talking about. I get both coated and standard from big blue and little orange. They don't carry a ton of different ones at the store because why would they? They are really heavy, hard to stock, the boxes break all the time (ones with a lot in there because you know you want thing cardboard for nails naturally), and there ...


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All guess work: That wall is an edition. If it was original to the house as a stiffener, it would be sitting directly on the lath. The little 'blue' pieces raise the 2x4 above the plaster lobes. If scraped completely flat, the ceiling below would have got all messed up. Even then, it's likely to pop the plaster off the lath, with what little is left ...


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If there is a wall directly below it is most likely the "top plate" that the walls studs are nailed to. If there are no studs attached it then is most likely a "stiffener" for the wood lath underneath it. In this case it would be keeping the lath strips in-line and level in order to prevent bouncing or flex. It has been installed there with a purpose unless ...


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I'm not sure of the exact formulas as I'm sure they're fairly complex but the John Bridge Deflect-o-meter is a good place to start: http://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/deflecto.pl


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I know this is old but when renovating the first thing you should do is move this over to PVC. Second bolt some pvc collars to the side walls so you don't have the metal guides hanging down. Third build a 3/4 box around it and sandwich roxul against wall and around pipe. The roxul will insulate and it will also keep much more sound out than foam.


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That's an extremely long span for 2x8s, even tripled. Do you know whether there was ever an intermediate post? Most would suggest that you have a engineer look over your situation. Existing framing isn't always a good indicator of what to use. At any rate, a pair of 1-3/4" microlam (or laminated veneer lumber--LVL) beams will almost certainly suffice. The ...


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These nails are not meant to sink even with the wood. If your framing is done right these nails should provide nothing more than bump resistance for the wall. Your framing should be very snug to joists and let the wood get itself straight. Meaning that the nails at the plates don't do much. When I am framing a basement I usually put in 3 per 8' board. ...


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If this is a base plate on the floor for a wall, you're fine as is and it pretty much happens to everyone. The nail is embedded in concrete, the floor keeps the base plate from moving lower, the nail's job is to keep it from moving side to side, and the wall you build on top of it is what will keep it from lifting up the small distance you see there. I ...


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I will guarantee you that plate will stay there until somebody pulls it up. There is a good bury on the nail point, you could strike it with a hammer if the plate is stable. If plate vibrates, there is a strong possibility that the nail will blow out a big chip and the nail will loose what hold it had. To solve it, use a red load, that should get it down ...


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I always seem to have this problem with powder setting. I have one of the hammer actuated ones like this one (it quite possibly is that one -- I haven't had it out in a while): What I usually do is load another charge in the gun and fire it over the same nail to set it. As far as the safety of doing this with any particular tool goes, my disclaimer is ...


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Fire rated drywall, if the ceiling is required to have this installed, must be installed for the entire ceiling of the given room. This helps provide a means of slowing a fire from reaching the room above it. Make sure you understand, by no means will this stop a fire from advancing it will only slow its progress in order to give occupants more time to exit ...


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Drywall (or sheetrock) on the ceiling is installed tight against the wall framing with hopefully less than 1/2" gap. Any gap larger than this removes the support you'll provide later. The drywall installed on the walls is next installed on the top half of the wall pressed against the ceiling drywall which gives it support. Then the bottom half of the ...



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