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11

You could use one of the many variations of the mortise and tenon joint, depending on the look you're going for. Though I agree with HerrBag, that the strength of a mortise and tenon joint should not rely on glue. Tusk Tenon This is a through tenon variation, where a wedge is used to lock the joint together. Fox tail (Wedged) Tenon This is another ...


7

No, I would not recommend nailing through carpet. Whether or not you prefer to, cutting the carpet and pad and removing them (under the wall) is the only right way to do this job. Baseboards on top of carpet will look like baseboards on top of carpet. If that's not how the rest of the baseboards are done, they will indeed look "off;" especially in the ...


6

Mortise and tenon joints do not need glue to be strong. If they fit tightly and are oriented properly to carry load through the post (like a stud) and the tenon stabilizes lateral loads, it only need to be secured with a peg or screw. Tester101's tusks would be good for the slats. I was envisioning table type aprons for the corners.. This photo shows ...


5

The wall seems to have 'full dimension' studs and the markings of old lath and plaster. I don't see plywood sheathing on the exterior walls. All in all I'm guessing that your house was built prior to WWII and is either 'post and beam' or 'balloon frame' construction, both of which are radically different in terms of structure and loads from modern ...


5

It's much easier to check that something is level than to check that something is 6 degrees or 1/4 inch higher. Build it level. Then add a 1/4 inch strip of wood (a length of lath or trim) across the inside edge of the horizontal framing member. You are correct that the sleeve will be sitting on two edges, the added trim strip and the outside edge of the ...


4

There are general guidelines for dealing with cuts in wood framing. For load bearing the basics are that you can notch 25% of the stud or 40% diameter for a hole. Note: Notches should not be square - this provides a weak point in the stud. Half circle your notches if you can. Now there are ways around this if you need a bigger notch or hole. In my ...


4

I know you already accepted, but I disagree with @bib on a few points that don't fit in a comment, so I'll provide my own answer. So long as you build a solid frame and connect it well, once installed there is really no chance of existing drywall being "crushed" by the frame. To crush the connecting drywall after installation, you'd need a very serious ...


4

Rip some strips of 1/8 hardboard (masonite) and tack them on the new studs. Or you could use plywood, but hardboard is usually less expensive, and less prone to giving you splinters when you rip a bunch of it.


4

As a home inspector, I can tell you that sheer existence of those damaged joists are going to be a RED FLAG at any time you decide to sell and move on. If they are badly burned, they are not structurally sound and should be removed. Install a few temp supports on ends of adjacent joists, then remove and replace them one or two at a time. Use proper joist ...


4

International Residential Code 2012 Chapter 6 Wall Construction Section R602 Wood Wall Framing R602.7 Headers. For header spans see Tables R502.5(1) and R502.5(2). So if you're on the top floor, you can use 2 2x4's (unless the building is 36' wide, in which case you'll need 2 2x6's). If you have a floor above, you'll need 2 2x6's ...


3

You need to box off that floor joist. You can remove an section of the joist in the way. You then build a box connecting the ends of the cut off joist to adjacent joists with perpendicular ties of the same dimensions of lumber. 2X10's for example. These ties transfer the load to the adjacent joists and give you an opening for plumbing or duct work.


3

Rough openings are exactly as they are called, rough. Yours sounds extra rough though. All rough openings are made to have space to add shims, sometimes the rough openings, because of conditions, can only take shims on one side or the other. As a rule of thumb I usually do not use no more than 2 shims on a side. If the rough opening (RO) has need for more, ...


3

It might be good to consider a sliding dovetail. Edit 11/16/13 To assemble your bed frame, the M&T joints with captured bolts with nuts to hold the corners together with the legs. Just as a mention, a good hardwood needs to be used for the assembly. regular 2X4, 2X6s and other similar materials used in the construction of homes will be too soft, and ...


3

I would knock that sucker out with impunity. If it is to serve some purpose, it most likely would not be code compliant. Fire blocking is the first thing that comes to mind, but it is only in one stud section.


3

Any framing that directly contacts concrete should be pressure treated. So option 3. Sealing is an optimistic concept at best, .vs. ensuring that there is proper drainage outside the basement, but you could certainly put construction adhesive on the bottom of the soleplate, it won't hurt.


3

I think the big issue is the carpet. Keeping a padding and old carpet below 2x4 isn't something I would ever suggest but the chances are no one will ever know unless they take the wall out. Now the pad and carpet could make fastening the 2x4 to the concrete. That is something to think about. The most important thing is the carpet in the rooms. It was ...


3

Have him re-frame it, as it almost certainly won't pass inspection. Not sure what the code specifies in you area, but the International Residential Code is really specific as to the requirements: R603.7 Jack and king studs. The number of jack and king studs installed on each side of a header shall comply with Table R603.7(1). King, jack and ...


3

Now that I've seen the photos, it's clear to me that at least the jack studs should be replaced; fortunately, their replacement should be fairly easy. The one on the latch side could be replaced by a 4x4, but it should have a tiny "sill plate" attached to half its bottom end with contruction adhesive because otherwise it'll overhang the existing sill plate. ...


2

No, it's not ok to essentially cut a jack or king stud into two pieces. In addition to providing support to the wall from the door opening and closing, they are carrying all the load of the wall over the door via the header. You'll need to find a different location to run your drain line.


2

OK. You were right in all of you assertions. Really basic picture of a properly framed window. The contractor should not step foot in your house again. He is a moron. He can't even make a good excuse. Also and this is worse than the improper framing technique. The current layout is in no way set at right angles.


2

From looking at your pictures I can say that it was not done correctly. Sad part is that it is so easy to do it correctly when the studs are all open. There really should be doubled headers above and below the window. They should, in both cases, be resting on the top of studs that extend from the ends of the header down to a bearing surface all the way to ...


2

Considering that you have a relatively high sideboard/headboard and footboard arrangement, that can be used to help strengthen the headers around the perimeter. The strength of a piece of 3/4" plywood, 21 plus inches tall on the sides alone with a small ledger to support the joists and bed slats is sufficient if all is glued and screwed together and has a ...


2

One really strong option to consider is drawbore pegs. These use a slightly offset hole to pull the joint tight. They can be done fairly easily with home-center oak dowels. I found them to be reasonably easy as a beginner, and they even compensate for a loose joint if you don't quite get the fit exactly right. Google "drawbore joint" for all the details ...


2

Why? You are going to have to seal and finish the edges where the new wall meets the existing walls and ceiling. To do that, you are going to compromise the area of the existing drywall. Why not trim out a channel in the existing drywall the width of your new studs so that you can get good, tight firm attachment points. The problem with butting framing up ...


2

If you were to just frame up the current opening above the half wall, you're going to run in to problems with the wall flexing, possibly cracking the drywall. Therefore, at a minimum, I would put at least a doubled-up stud at the end of the half-wall that runs from the floor to the ceiling. (But first remove drywall and trim from the end and top of the ...


2

I wouldn't build it that way in the first place. Hiding a dryer duct within a wall and venting it through the roof (I'm guessing here, but that's what it looks like to me) is just begging for nobody to clean it until it eventually catches fire and burns the house down. I recently re-did my utility room and discovered an in-wall rigid steel duct just like ...


2

Roxul batts do not compress a lot, well not nearly as much as traditional fiberglass. They are also pretty rigid. They can definitely go 6 feet or so in a wall cavity. I have used them to do what you are doing, when there aren't things in the way. I am guessing you believe you don't have cross bracing or electric/plumbing or obviously this won't work. I ...


2

Substantial changes to a load-bearing wall really an engineer's review. The consequences of getting it wrong are unacceptable. When it came time to take out a loadbearing wall in my place, I hired a contractor, who brought in an engineer to calculate exactly what size parallam beam would be needed to span the gap and how to provide the necessary support ...


2

I would normally say yes but it appears the 2x4 on the right is heavily notched in a weird fashion. I would keep blocking across from this to make sure that vertical 2x4 is stable. Not really sure you need a piece that big though.


2

The recommended rough opening for a 36" x 80" door, is 38 1/2" x 82". So you're basically looking at something like this. Basically, you'll have to fill the purple area with framing. Which means you might have to either use thin planks on the sides, or cut into the walls to install framing. The rough opening (blue) around the jamb (brown) will be left ...



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