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21

No, it's not ok. For one thing, by the time the city inspector looks at the fully framed building, it will be a little too late to fix it. Secondly, the builder's attitude seems very questionable. Either his framing crew or the concrete sub messed up. At the very least their job is not done in a workmanlike manner. They shouldn't wait and hope things 'slip' ...


17

If this is a load-bearing wall you'll want to frame the pet door in, just like you would a window. This will allow you to properly carry the load down, and around the pet door. The king studs should go all the way from the top plate, down to the bottom plate. The header will be made up of 1/2" plywood/OSB, sandwiched between two 2x4s. If you don't want ...


10

OK this is easy. The answer is NO. The construction has issues: There are no bolts for the sill plates. 2.The sill plates should be spaced on the slab so that wall plus exterior finish meets slab. It looks like this house is getting brick or thick stone given the 3 inches or so from the edge. I am not sure about your situation. You are having a ...


9

You could use one of the many variations of the mortise and tenon joint, depending on the look you're going for. Though I agree with HerrBag, that the strength of a mortise and tenon joint should not rely on glue. Tusk Tenon This is a through tenon variation, where a wedge is used to lock the joint together. Fox tail (Wedged) Tenon This is another ...


8

The brace is providing lateral support. If you build a wall with the top and bottom plate plus some studs, it's easy to shift the wall out of square and turn it into a parallelogram. Under load, a house would take an 8' shift to one side and flatten to the ground. With the brace, the wall remains square and holds perpendicular walls plumb. In typical ...


5

I have to say that I am no fan of cordless framer nailers. I have had two different ones, a Porter Cable and a Pasload. Both were gas fired. The PC was a disaster. Had lots of problems with the propane cells seating properly and nails jamming. Got the Pasload, worked OK, but slow and the smell was so bad that I only used it outdoors. The gas cells are ...


5

Mortise and tenon joints do not need glue to be strong. If they fit tightly and are oriented properly to carry load through the post (like a stud) and the tenon stabilizes lateral loads, it only need to be secured with a peg or screw. Tester101's tusks would be good for the slats. I was envisioning table type aprons for the corners.. This photo shows ...


5

The wall seems to have 'full dimension' studs and the markings of old lath and plaster. I don't see plywood sheathing on the exterior walls. All in all I'm guessing that your house was built prior to WWII and is either 'post and beam' or 'balloon frame' construction, both of which are radically different in terms of structure and loads from modern ...


5

It's much easier to check that something is level than to check that something is 6 degrees or 1/4 inch higher. Build it level. Then add a 1/4 inch strip of wood (a length of lath or trim) across the inside edge of the horizontal framing member. You are correct that the sleeve will be sitting on two edges, the added trim strip and the outside edge of the ...


4

This is bracing that is needed for a shear wall. This provides lateral support, which is needed in areas prone to hurricanes and earthquakes. Typically, the plywood sheathing and drywall is all that is needed to provide shear support low risk homes. This kind of bracing is often turned on its side and let into the stud framing (notching the studs) rather ...


4

There are probably various limitations per region and per type of code. It also depends on what we mean by 'conventional' framing. For stick framing (platform) it appears the limit is 5 stories primarily due to fire code: Source


4

There are general guidelines for dealing with cuts in wood framing. For load bearing the basics are that you can notch 25% of the stud or 40% diameter for a hole. Note: Notches should not be square - this provides a weak point in the stud. Half circle your notches if you can. Now there are ways around this if you need a bigger notch or hole. In my ...


4

Shear walls resist lateral loads like from an earthquake or hurricane. They are important parts of the building structure, even if they do not support any of the weight of the building in the traditional "load-bearing" sense (although they might). If that really is a shear wall, you must not modify it without the approval of an engineer or other qualified ...


4

I know you already accepted, but I disagree with @bib on a few points that don't fit in a comment, so I'll provide my own answer. So long as you build a solid frame and connect it well, once installed there is really no chance of existing drywall being "crushed" by the frame. To crush the connecting drywall after installation, you'd need a very serious ...


4

As a home inspector, I can tell you that sheer existence of those damaged joists are going to be a RED FLAG at any time you decide to sell and move on. If they are badly burned, they are not structurally sound and should be removed. Install a few temp supports on ends of adjacent joists, then remove and replace them one or two at a time. Use proper joist ...


3

The condition you outline is not uncommon. It usually results from humidity changes. Typically, the tolerances were a bit too tight when the house was built, not exactly squared or the door framing was not secured as tightly as it should have been. Here are a couple of things you can do now to mitigate the problems. Replace the center screw of each hinge ...


3

As this is a 1x board, I take it this is a ridge board and not a true beam. If this is in an attic and there are ceiling joists below the rafters making a triangular structure, the ridge board has little structural value, it just serves to tie the rafters together, it does not support any vertical loads. In that case, nail/gluing patch blocks on each side ...


3

As I understand your question, you do not want to run the inside wall all the way to the ceiling so that you can keep the wall space above the new knee walls. If so you will certainly want to cap the space at the top of the knee wall to leave a good grounding for a finished surface. One way that you can do this is to attach a 2x2 to the inside of the ...


3

Rough openings are exactly as they are called, rough. Yours sounds extra rough though. All rough openings are made to have space to add shims, sometimes the rough openings, because of conditions, can only take shims on one side or the other. As a rule of thumb I usually do not use no more than 2 shims on a side. If the rough opening (RO) has need for more, ...


3

You need to box off that floor joist. You can remove an section of the joist in the way. You then build a box connecting the ends of the cut off joist to adjacent joists with perpendicular ties of the same dimensions of lumber. 2X10's for example. These ties transfer the load to the adjacent joists and give you an opening for plumbing or duct work.


2

No, this is not correct. When the slab was poured, the architect should have specified on the blue prints that 1/2" all thread rods should be placed every so many inches (I don't recall what the US Building Code states at the moment, but I think mine was every 18 or 24 inches when I built my room addition). You are then supposed to take a washer and a nut ...


2

My answer about the construction is that it depends: In New Zealand for instance, you MUST have the bottom plates beyond the edge of the slab (as some of yours are) for weather-tightness reasons. The cladding is often then run down past the level of the slab. The idea is that the framing has a waterproof layer (a.k.a "building wrap") then an air gap to the ...


2

I am guessing that this is an exterior wall which means it is load bearing. You will probably have to put in a stud on each side of the dog door and carry the load of the stud you are cutting to the outer two studs... So then you will generally have to rip out a small section of drywall and do a little work - frame like installing a window. This is ...


2

There is no specific limit on the number of sequential studs, as the 7/8" limit is intended to reduce the potential stresses, however, given the choice, I would rather drill than notch: 2308.9.11 Bored holes. A hole not greater in diameter than 40 percent of the stud width is permitted to be bored in any wood stud. [...] and In no case shall the edge of ...


2

It might be good to consider a sliding dovetail. Edit 11/16/13 To assemble your bed frame, the M&T joints with captured bolts with nuts to hold the corners together with the legs. Just as a mention, a good hardwood needs to be used for the assembly. regular 2X4, 2X6s and other similar materials used in the construction of homes will be too soft, and ...


2

I have worked with engineers on shear walls in florida. I have seen many examples of the amount of shear protection. I have never seen a diagonal 1x6 used in an interior wall. For example just some cross bracing would provide much better protection. A layer of plywood under drywall would be better. My point is that unless we are missing something in the ...


2

OK. You were right in all of you assertions. Really basic picture of a properly framed window. The contractor should not step foot in your house again. He is a moron. He can't even make a good excuse. Also and this is worse than the improper framing technique. The current layout is in no way set at right angles.


2

From looking at your pictures I can say that it was not done correctly. Sad part is that it is so easy to do it correctly when the studs are all open. There really should be doubled headers above and below the window. They should, in both cases, be resting on the top of studs that extend from the ends of the header down to a bearing surface all the way to ...


2

Drill a hole, or a recess, into the bottom plate of the prefab wall, so the bolts holding the sill plate to the concrete just slide right in/through. Or, drill a similar recess into the sill plate, recess the nut into the sill plate (probably with a washer to spread the load over the thinner wood), and grind/cut the bolt off level with the top of the ...


2

Considering that you have a relatively high sideboard/headboard and footboard arrangement, that can be used to help strengthen the headers around the perimeter. The strength of a piece of 3/4" plywood, 21 plus inches tall on the sides alone with a small ledger to support the joists and bed slats is sufficient if all is glued and screwed together and has a ...



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