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9

In general, there is no problem in screwing drywall (or most other materials or light weight fixtures) into any framing members. This includes 2X studs, beams, steel studs or other variants on these. There are restrictions on notching and drilling large holes. Dimensional lumber is most forgiving of these modifications, but manufactured beams have ...


9

Can't say for sure why they did it in your situation, without knowing a bit more details. Typically blocking is installed to prevent framing members from twisting or warping, and to stiffen and add strength to the wall. Though it's also common to install blocking, where fire stops are required by code. Blocking can also provide an attachment point for ...


8

So long as one side of the heads of the nails are touching the studs, there is no problem. These nails merely keep the stud from slipping to one side or the other, and nails angled in from each side will do the job with no difficulty, even thought he heads are not fully flush. If, for some reason, you had to drive a nail into the narrow edge of the stud (...


6

The rule is that the studs in any exterior or load-bearing wall may be notched, but no deeper than 25% of the width of the stud, or a hole no bigger than 40% of the width of the stud may be bored in it (you could pass the conduit or cable through the stud). There's an exception that you can notch 60% of the depth if the stud is doubled and no more than two ...


6

The blocks are known as Dwangs or Nogs here, and was confused about what blocks you were asking about. But they are used for stiffening the wall and attaching drywall, as well as mounting points for basins etc. Not heard of them being used for firestopping, and does not make a lot of sense to me. Recommendation from BRANZ (local building regulation ...


6

Typical of firestopping, so that (when sheeted with drywall) flames cannot run the full height of the wall inside the stud bay. It would be better to move (up or down a few inches), rather than remove the blocking, for that reason. While it may be unfinished at present, the builders presumably intended that it be ready for drywall if/when you or some other ...


6

When you start a wall, your first board is not supposed to be on 16" centers. You're right, the first stud will end up 15.25" center to center from the second stud but that is because you don't want you first stud to be centered on the edge of the sheeting (whether your sheeting it with plywood, sheetrock, or whatever you're using). Rather, you want your ...


6

Aside from electrical and plumbing interference, you can do pretty much whatever you want with the framing. That wall is mostly decorative (it saved some money by not requiring the cabinet makers to finish the backs of the cabinets). If you have smooth walls, open the drywall enough to work. Frame in your opening, replace the drywall, add corner bead or ...


5

I don't think those rafter ties will work for support. The width of the room isn't what's important so much as the span from support to support. I can't imagine a garage layout that would have a span short enough to make with 2x4's, even sistered. You'd also have to have the attachments to the top plate of the walls adequate to support the weight of the ...


5

Here is my suggestion. It is only part of the post in the drawing, but it is the same all the way up, the scrap pieces of plywood are about 1 ft apart 3 or 4" wide, can be wider, can be solid, done that too. Makes for a really strong corner for corner bead. If you don't use 1/2" plywood and need to use 1/4" it will still be really strong. Using a full piece ...


5

Unfortunately, as with most questions like this, you're going to have to talk to an engineer. A bunch of amateur DIYers on the internet, is not the proper resource for this type of information. You're making a major structural change to a building, and you don't want it to cause property damage or personal injury. The "correct" and responsible thing to do,...


5

You have a complicated question here and the best (and most legally-correct) answer will probably come from talking to your local building inspector. Preferably before a lot of work has already been done... First, the question of which building code is even applicable is not clear to me. The International Residential Code ("IRC") only applies for 1- and 2-...


4

Yes. This is called balloon framing: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Framing_(construction)#Balloon_framing The catch in 2015 is that it might not be all that easy to find 16' 2x4s that are all that straight. I'd personally go with 2x6's in this case for added rigidity, load bearing abilities, increased insulation space (important on that high wall) and ...


4

it doesn't matter, because the stresses on between-stud blocking is 100% horizontal compression. The vertical orientation of the deep face absolutely doesn't matter...though having it horizontal, spanning the full width of the studs would help to prevent torsion/twisting forces, and thus would be ever-so-slightly preferred.


4

Horizontal blocking IS used with 2x lumber on edge for non-structural reasons: grab bar blocking, plumbing fixtures (notably freestanding wall sinks) and kitchen cabinets. Its usually shifted to the front of the wall, just behind the drywall. For sinks, 2x6 is usually used, allowing a range of mounting heights, ditto for grab bars in baths and showers. ...


4

The bigger question is how many vertical supports and how long are they? 1/4" lags 2” into the 2x4 has 510lb pull out strength (255lb/inch) put 2 or 3 in each piece of strut and each one can handle hundreds of pounds. 5/16” lags 266lb/inch; 3/8"lags 305lbs/inch. You don’t need a very big lag bolt when using multiples. My examples have a small safety factor ...


4

I will guarantee you that plate will stay there until somebody pulls it up. There is a good bury on the nail point, you could strike it with a hammer if the plate is stable. If plate vibrates, there is a strong possibility that the nail will blow out a big chip and the nail will loose what hold it had. To solve it, use a red load, that should get it down ...


4

If this is a base plate on the floor for a wall, you're fine as is and it pretty much happens to everyone. The nail is embedded in concrete, the floor keeps the base plate from moving lower, the nail's job is to keep it from moving side to side, and the wall you build on top of it is what will keep it from lifting up the small distance you see there. I ...


4

The right way to fix this is to have a local engineer size a LVL (laminated veneer lumber) beam for you (solid wood lumber won't meet modern standards for a span that long). It'll likely be taller than your current beam. You'll need to temporarily support all the rafters with a framed wall on each side, using double top plates. Keep them a few feet away from ...


4

According to Table R602.3(1) of the International residential code (IRC), you have to use two 16d (3 1/2" x 0.135") fasteners to end nail the top or sole plate to a stud. If the studs were toe nailed to the sole plate, then either three 8d (2 1/2" x 0.133") or two 16d (3 1/2" x 0.135") fasteners would be required. International Residential Code 2012 ...


3

LVL is laminated veneer lumber. The numbers 1.9 and 2.0 refer to the Modulus of Elasticity which is a measure of the stiffness of the beam. I would seriously doubt that there is any meaningful difference between 1.9 and 2.0 rated beams.


3

Fastening schedules are quite straight forward. You look up what you're connecting together, and it tells you what size fastener to use, how many to use, the spacing between fasteners, and where the fastener should go. There are no exceptions based on how the fastener is driven. For example: According to International Residential Code 2012, if you're ...


3

I agree with Tester101's comment. The current "header" in each closet opening appears to be just one flat 2x4. You will want to install a pair of 2xX framing members on edge that can span the total new opening width without sagging. The ends of this should sit on top of the jack studs at the sides of the opening. A convenient way to make this header ...


3

You're using the wrong type of screws. It should be a #7 Pan-Head And Not the self tapping. The self tapping is good for thicker metal studs but the the sharp tip works best for those angle shots you're having trouble with. Use #8 self tapping for the tougher thicker steel studs


3

In every town that I have done building you would have to provide a landing area to put this door and the landing would need to be at minimum 36". I do not know how that would work on an existing staircase so I would say the answer is simply no for most towns. However your best bet is to call local inspector and ask them if they will allow anything or ...


3

A door is held up by hinges in the jamb (the broad boards surrounding the door, perpendicular to the surface of the wall). The jamb is thin material, usually a little over 1/2 inch thick, but it is firmly nailed to the jack stud, which gives it rigidity, as does any casing added between the jamb and the wall. The header also sits on the jack stud. While you ...


3

Studs in a wall are individual parts of a system. Unless you're talking about an unfinished load-bearing wall in a basement, for example, you have many studs, drywall or other sheathing, and possibly blocking or bracing all working together. Even cutting a single stud half way through doesn't substantially weaken the wall. There are many cases of 2" plumbing ...


3

These nails are not meant to sink even with the wood. If your framing is done right these nails should provide nothing more than bump resistance for the wall. Your framing should be very snug to joists and let the wood get itself straight. Meaning that the nails at the plates don't do much. When I am framing a basement I usually put in 3 per 8' board. ...


3

In all the nail sizes specified in the charts, 10D (3") nails are also an option. In the building trade, that is the size pretty much used everywhere when it comes to nailing up framing in anyplace. In answer to the 8D question, 4 nails will easily fit into the bottom of a 2X4, yes they will cross each other, but only in the plate where the split resistance ...


3

Blocking is required wherever a fire or draft can pass from horizontal plane to a vertical plane or vice versa. In otherwords, where the wall meets the floor and the floor meets a ceiling. If fire can pass through one section and travel to another, it needs to be blocked. The 2012 IRC code says that a 16" section of fiberglass insulation will suffice as ...



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