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9

In general, there is no problem in screwing drywall (or most other materials or light weight fixtures) into any framing members. This includes 2X studs, beams, steel studs or other variants on these. There are restrictions on notching and drilling large holes. Dimensional lumber is most forgiving of these modifications, but manufactured beams have ...


7

Framing is structural, not cosmetic. So wood splinters and rough cuts are not an issue as long as they are carrying the load above and provide a good nailing surface at the correct locations. The part of the home you see, drywall (particularly the mudding), cabinets, flooring, etc, is where you make sure it looks good for appearance, but those looks don't ...


7

I'd use 3 good ones in an 8 foot run; more if they don't feel solid. (Since it's not structural, all you're really trying to do is hold the wall to the floor and resist any after-the-fact warp/twist issues.)


6

Not critical at all. There are best practices. Like making sure corners have stud surface on both sides, making all studs 16 on center, make all studs plumb. Does it matter? No. Do inspectors care? No. Now I wouldn't suggest making your studs further than 16 inches but back in the day they were generally 24 for basements. I have seen people do them ...


5

It looks to me like the proper fix for this is going to end up being a lot more work that what you probably want to hear about. If I was the contractor recommending the repair scenario I would be saying to remove whole upper structure and replace it anew. Such a flat roof is always a recipe for a mess like this. It it was at all possible to rebuild the ...


4

Have him re-frame it, as it almost certainly won't pass inspection. Not sure what the code specifies in you area, but the International Residential Code is really specific as to the requirements: R603.7 Jack and king studs. The number of jack and king studs installed on each side of a header shall comply with Table R603.7(1). King, jack and ...


4

Now that I've seen the photos, it's clear to me that at least the jack studs should be replaced; fortunately, their replacement should be fairly easy. The one on the latch side could be replaced by a 4x4, but it should have a tiny "sill plate" attached to half its bottom end with contruction adhesive because otherwise it'll overhang the existing sill plate. ...


3

In the UK, house construction is divided into separate stages "first fix" and "second fix" first-fix includes carpentry that the eventual occupier of the house won't see. For example the woodwork inside stud-walls. It is expected and normal that this isn't finished to the standard you would expect of a second-fix carpenter and not to the standard you would ...


3

In addition to what Michael said, I see an another problem: this roof structure is a moisture trap if you live somewhere that's not a desert and where it ever gets cold. Moisture-laden interior air that's trying to get out will migrate up through the ceiling drywall and the air-permeable fiberglass insulation until it hits a cold surface. That cold surface ...


3

In the United States, most building codes require a minimum dimension for wood studs in bearing walls is 2x4(nominal). The number of jack-studs varies with the size of building, the width of the opening, and the ground snow load from 1 to many. It is common for building codes to allow the use of approved framing anchors, in lieu of jack studs when only one ...


3

I don't think this is a great idea. The cabin kits you've found have the following major drawbacks that I can see: No insulation. You'll have unnecessarily high heating and cooling bills unless you plan to build where it's 75 and cloudy year-round. No real protection from water. When those boards get wet, so will the interior side, eventually. As soon as ...


3

I recommend that you should insulate this room like a basement: with rigid foam covering the exposed masonry walls, with the seams and edges sealed off to make it an air barrier. No need to frame anything at all if space is at a premium. I wouldn't frame anyway without rigid foam here, since the thermal bridging of the studs will compromise the insulation ...


3

You have a few options. Frame around the beam. This is probably the easiest method, though it changes the dimensions of the room slightly. Simply build your wall either in front of, or behind the beam. Attach the top plate to the joists. Weld studs to the beam You could weld threaded, or non-threaded rods (studs) to the bottom of the beam. Then drill ...


3

LVL is laminated veneer lumber. The numbers 1.9 and 2.0 refer to the Modulus of Elasticity which is a measure of the stiffness of the beam. I would seriously doubt that there is any meaningful difference between 1.9 and 2.0 rated beams.


3

I agree with Tester101's comment. The current "header" in each closet opening appears to be just one flat 2x4. You will want to install a pair of 2xX framing members on edge that can span the total new opening width without sagging. The ends of this should sit on top of the jack studs at the sides of the opening. A convenient way to make this header ...


3

Fastening schedules are quite straight forward. You look up what you're connecting together, and it tells you what size fastener to use, how many to use, the spacing between fasteners, and where the fastener should go. There are no exceptions based on how the fastener is driven. For example: According to International Residential Code 2012, if you're ...


2

This is a bad idea. If you span more than 6 feet the T&G boards will flex alot. It will not hold weight of roof. You would need to use 4x4's to be strong enough to hold roof and to have shear strength Wood will expand and contract and you will get gaps for water and cold air to get in. T&G boards are expense and will cost more or very similar to ...


2

Your hunch is correct - the anchor bolt in the picture obviously isn't doing a whole lot. If the scabbed on 2x4 bothers you, just remove it, cut the existing anchor bolt off flush with the concrete, and put in a new anchor through the center of the base plate.


2

The answer ultimately depends upon your local climate/weather (heavy wind loading?), but generally the way to handle that situation is to span the joists at the top plate with a "rim joist", then toenail all the joists to the top plate. BTW... you might want your top plate to extend over the top of that corner post instead of nailing to its side. ...


2

if the post is within the line of the walls: Blue is existing, red is nailing strips, green is bulkhead...


2

The only reason not to frame everything up would be logistics. If it would be hard to get the bathtub or drywall into the basement because of a framed wall in the way. Cost could be another factor. You would be staggering your project in a possibly inconvenient manner. It may also require extra sets of permits and inspections from the local gov't due to the ...


2

There is okay sloppy, and there is bad sloppy. Bad sloppy has an impact on the finish of the house. For example, if you don't crown your joists correctly, your floor will be a bit wavy. If you don't choose good studs for your kitchen, it will be harder to hang cabinets and they won't look as good. Neither of these violate building code, but you can notice ...


2

Tear it all off and rebuild a roof that's not made out of 2x4's. To fix-at-it, tear off all the ceiling drywall. Temporarily support the beams and remove the sisters (the tacked-on LVL's). Insert new 2x4 sisters that go the entire span, tucked above the header that would of been behind you while taking that picture, short enough to slip up into the ...


2

An inch out is not that big of a deal, though an inspector might not want to see it. If you can Add a stud, Can you not just fix it so it is straight? I will use construction screws with pre-drilled holed when I have a tricky placement that needs a bit of finessing. Attaching a second stud to it would also make that one out of plumb, but would suffice the ...


2

You can't frame out in 1x3 especially in a basement. It is just too flimsy and and warping with probably make it brittle. If you want to save an inch or two (which you will never notice) then please frame in 2x3. You won't have any issues with 2x3s (other than having to install shallow electrical boxes in some cases). Note: Watched the video on the ...


2

You can notch a joist up to 1/6 the depth of the joist. For example, a 2x10 can be notched 1.54166" deep (9 1/4" / 6). However, you cannot notch a joist within the middle 1/3 of the joists length. The notch can also only be 1/3 the depth of the joist wide. Again with the 2x10 example, that means the notch can only be 3.0833" wide (9 1/4" / 3). Since ceiling ...


2

How easy this project is, will depend on the underlying framing. There's two ways these corners could have been framed. Side walls to the end This will make what you want to do fairly easy. Top down view of the framing End walls to the side This is the more likely of the two. Which means you'll either have to build out the corner, or lose 3 1/2" ...


2

Notice that sill plate sitting on top of the beam? Held on with some nails hammered part of the way in, then bent over the flange? Do the same with your top plate. The sill plate has the advantage of gravity holding it in place, so you'll probably want to put more bent nails in, especially if you'll have kids down there playing who may be running into it. ...


2

The reason why 2x4s are faced thin side out is: The other way would mean you would use a 2x2 base which would be too wobbly, even for non-loadbearing walls. The wide side is more prone to warping issues. Can you imagine trying to get plumbing/electric/whatever through the wall if it were framed like this. It is fine to have a board facing like this ...



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