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3

Ed Beal is right. Assuming something like #10 or #12 screws (as opposed to 3/8" lag screws, for example), even if they collide the second will merely glance off the first. It's not an issue. To avoid the situation altogether, simply offset by 1/4" or so.


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This is the typical structure of a hip-roof: As you can see, the ridge board, or ridge beam, is holding up the "jack rafters" at the top of the incline. Arguably the 4 diagonal boards - the hip rafters - are holding up the ridge board on their own, but simply for load bearing purposes, place supports under the ends of the ridge board (and possibly one in ...


2

Studs are vertical. They are present to transfer the weight from the top plates (which are the top pieces that frame the wall) to the bottom plates, all of which then gets transferred to the next level down. Beams and top plates are similar in function but beams carry more load over a wider span, and usually rest on either solid walls (foundation walls) or ...


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What about just drywalling the faces of the 2x4s and letting it hang off, to fill that 2.5" gap? E.g., use a 6" wide strip. You should probably plywood the bottom sill for safety (yours and the cat's) before you drywall it. Use corner bead and mud it for a 'temporary-permanent' solution, after you do shove a little more insulation back there.


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This would depend on if you're building a dog house, shed, home or villa. You are asking for specific answers about an obscure subject. Gather your information about the project and speak with a Qualified and Licensed Engineer in the jurisdiction that you will be doing the work.


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When you drive the first screws, drive at 1 times your measure and 2 times your measure. Turn the corner and drive at 1 1/2 and 2 1/2 your measure of your measure. (Pick your measure to fit your space). For example if you have a five inch space to fasten, screw first 1 and 3 inches from the bottom, turn the corner and screw 2 and 4 inches from the bottom


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I have used wet rags / towels and a heat gun if I take two long in making bent wood "butcher block" counter tops. With bad 2x4" I will use them in shorter pieces for fire blocks (ok now 2x6) or find other uses because if not dried straight they may twist again if only anchored at top and bottom in a wall. If you have a large number I did see 1 contractor ...


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If the 2x4 is not too twisted, then you can probably just use a clamp or a block. Start by fastening one end of the stud in place, and then use one nail to fasten the other end. The nail should be placed such that one of the edges of the stud is centered (as it should be). The other edge (lets call it edge B) will not be on center until a clamp or block is ...



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