Hot answers tagged

6

The reason for a rough opening is so that it CAN be rough in dimensions. Your opening should be no problem. Rough openings are made larger to accommodate headers and floors than out of level, adjacent studs that may be out of plumb, framing lumber that has thickness variations, openings that are slightly out of square and maybe some other things I've not ...


2

There's a built-in gap in the height and width of the opening. so trimmer/king plumb parallel to the wall's length isn't crucial (to a degree). It's far more critical to get the wall itself plumb perpendicular to the rough opening. Nearly everything else can be shimmed out later, assuming reasonably accurate dimensions. Using a level of adequate length (to ...


2

Generally for interior doors the RO (Rough Opening) is 2 inches wider than the door slab. This gives 3/4" for the jamb and 1/4" of 'play' for each side, for you to adjust the jamb to make the door operate properly. So if you've got 29 13/16 instead of 30, you'll end up with a little over 1/4 of play total instead of 1/2. Still should be plenty if your jacks ...


2

If you look closely at the boards on the inside, you will see they are overlapping, the top edge being behind the bottom edge of the board above (behind when viewed from the outside). This is standard clapboard type construction (although many modern clapboards have a tapered upper edge and the overlap is much greater). Rain tends to drip off the lower edge ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible