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6

Aside from electrical and plumbing interference, you can do pretty much whatever you want with the framing. That wall is mostly decorative (it saved some money by not requiring the cabinet makers to finish the backs of the cabinets). If you have smooth walls, open the drywall enough to work. Frame in your opening, replace the drywall, add corner bead or ...


5

You have a complicated question here and the best (and most legally-correct) answer will probably come from talking to your local building inspector. Preferably before a lot of work has already been done... First, the question of which building code is even applicable is not clear to me. The International Residential Code ("IRC") only applies for 1- and ...


3

According to Table R602.3(1) of the International residential code (IRC), you have to use two 16d (3 1/2" x 0.135") fasteners to end nail the top or sole plate to a stud. If the studs were toe nailed to the sole plate, then either three 8d (2 1/2" x 0.133") or two 16d (3 1/2" x 0.135") fasteners would be required. International Residential Code 2012 ...


3

The right way to fix this is to have a local engineer size a LVL (laminated veneer lumber) beam for you (solid wood lumber won't meet modern standards for a span that long). It'll likely be taller than your current beam. You'll need to temporarily support all the rafters with a framed wall on each side, using double top plates. Keep them a few feet away from ...


3

Means either the base wasn't flat or they cut their studs too short. You really shouldn't shim load bearing studs but we do it all the time with non load bearing. Ooops.


3

It's hard to provide a "straight answer" with the information given. Bearing wall vs. gable wall, rambler vs. two-story. Window position and wall height. There are many factors. I can tell you that triple-member headers are not common except where limited height is available. We built nearly all our exterior headers with doubled 2x10s in a U configuration, ...


2

First you need to determine the weight of the items you plan to store. If the trusses were designed under the IBC/IRC or the UBC (and maybe the BOCA and SBCCI) codes, then they should of been designed with a 10 psf live load on the bottom chord. If you keep below this loading you should be okay, but you might want to check out the code requirements for your ...


1

I would probably still use wood for the beam across the bed opening because it is so much easier to work with. The picture you posted shows a good 6 to 7 inches of space from the platform surface down to the top of the bed opening. This should be more than enough room for beams that can carry the weight. If your current plan is only allowing for a 3" beam ...


1

You are correct. Framing a wall or floor the two outer studs or joists are moved in to compensate for the end of the interval. If you are going for an exact dimension divisible by 4'. This makes placing 4'x8' sheets of OSB come out nice and even with no waste. Good luck!


1

The rule, at least here in the US, is a cantilever can extend no more than 1/3 the supported length (so, you could go ~3 feet further). Personally, I try to keep cantilevers no more than 2 feet, regardless of total supported length: while it might be OK structurally, it will likely sag the further you go, and can feel bouncy. To do the best job, get some ...



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