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9

In general, there is no problem in screwing drywall (or most other materials or light weight fixtures) into any framing members. This includes 2X studs, beams, steel studs or other variants on these. There are restrictions on notching and drilling large holes. Dimensional lumber is most forgiving of these modifications, but manufactured beams have ...


3

I agree with Tester101's comment. The current "header" in each closet opening appears to be just one flat 2x4. You will want to install a pair of 2xX framing members on edge that can span the total new opening width without sagging. The ends of this should sit on top of the jack studs at the sides of the opening. A convenient way to make this header ...


3

LVL is laminated veneer lumber. The numbers 1.9 and 2.0 refer to the Modulus of Elasticity which is a measure of the stiffness of the beam. I would seriously doubt that there is any meaningful difference between 1.9 and 2.0 rated beams.


3

Fastening schedules are quite straight forward. You look up what you're connecting together, and it tells you what size fastener to use, how many to use, the spacing between fasteners, and where the fastener should go. There are no exceptions based on how the fastener is driven. For example: According to International Residential Code 2012, if you're ...


2

That looks like nearly 3/4 inch in a 2 foot run. That is a lot of angle, and I think most carpenters would consider it unacceptable on a new framing job (unless there were some underlying issue, like a pipe or an old beam preventing a square outcome). But it also sounds like your contractor is challenged when it comes to getting something square. You can ...


2

Removing the vertical post and finding some other way of supporting the roof beam will be complicated, specially since there is very little space between the window top and where the roof beam enters the wall. This is where you would need to insert a cross beam or similar to support the load from the roof. Needless to say, it will not be pretty and would ...


1

Framing like that looks fine and is standard. Just put a single 2x flat at the top of the jamb instead of 2 and nail up into the cripples above it. As for the screwing into the floor, the closer you can get a screw or nail into the floor the better. We usually shoot some nails at an angle (toenail) at the bottom plate on each side of the opening. Other ...


1

I would put a small header across the entire 78" opening back nailing the header through the existing king studs, then put a single jack stud on either side at the exact width I need.


1

How much load can 2x3's or 2x4's attached to concrete block support? Typically a 2x on end can handle about 1250 PSI for doug fir. This is about 6,000+ lb for a 2x4, 4,500+ lb for a 2x3. Crushing wise, it depends on how often it is braced. You anchor a 2x4 into a concrete wall every 6" for 5' and I am sure it will actaully hold those loads. Is ...


1

In my opinion this should be done 3 times per span at a minimum. So really it depends what you are building with. If you use your stock 2x4s that are 8 feet then 3. But If you get longer 2x4s I think you can also go with 3, given there are no breaks. (This is also assuming that you can fasten the bottom every couple feet)


1

1 king and one jack per side, assuming it's not an unusual load above. If your header has space above, make the jack continue up to the plate. Only caution is that even though the 6" fill looks good on paper, the slightest fatness in your framing materials coupled with a tiny bit of "out of plumb", might mean your door is a tight fit. Buy the dryest 2x ...



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