Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

I'd use 3 good ones in an 8 foot run; more if they don't feel solid. (Since it's not structural, all you're really trying to do is hold the wall to the floor and resist any after-the-fact warp/twist issues.)


6

Not critical at all. There are best practices. Like making sure corners have stud surface on both sides, making all studs 16 on center, make all studs plumb. Does it matter? No. Do inspectors care? No. Now I wouldn't suggest making your studs further than 16 inches but back in the day they were generally 24 for basements. I have seen people do them ...


2

An inch out is not that big of a deal, though an inspector might not want to see it. If you can Add a stud, Can you not just fix it so it is straight? I will use construction screws with pre-drilled holed when I have a tricky placement that needs a bit of finessing. Attaching a second stud to it would also make that one out of plumb, but would suffice the ...


1

With steel sheetmetal studs fastened to sheetrock or plywood, the wall is plenty strong enough to securely support 200+ pounds—provided the load is attached and distributed properly. Either one alone (plywood or studs) can hold that weight, but in combination they are much stronger than the sum of their capacities. Note that the floor will carry most ...


1

The sill or bottom plate you are securing to the concrete will likely not take any impact itself, but will have to accept impacts from studs attached to it. This question shows a typical 2x4 can expect to hold well over 300 pounds of evenly distributed force over a 6 foot span with no issues. It will handle sudden impacts of significantly greater magnitude ...


1

My rule of thumb is one at each end, and then every other stud. Every other stud may be overkill, but it's easier to overdue it a little than under do it and have to repair the job later. Structural fasteners around the top and bottom plates tends to be done as close to a stud as possible, to leave lots of room for utilities that are being drilled through. ...


1

If you've prebuilt the wall, one per stud bay will provide sufficient clamping. (6 total for 16inch stud spacing) If you are stick-building in place , I like two at each end (staggered by an inch and countersunk). Then 3 more at 2 ft intervals. (7 total for 16inch stud spacing) I use the 1/4 inch vs the 3/16 version for more strength. The 3 1/2 x 1/4 are ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible