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9

Can't say for sure why they did it in your situation, without knowing a bit more details. Typically blocking is installed to prevent framing members from twisting or warping, and to stiffen and add strength to the wall. Though it's also common to install blocking, where fire stops are required by code. Blocking can also provide an attachment point for ...


6

The blocks are known as Dwangs or Nogs here, and was confused about what blocks you were asking about. But they are used for stiffening the wall and attaching drywall, as well as mounting points for basins etc. Not heard of them being used for firestopping, and does not make a lot of sense to me. Recommendation from BRANZ (local building regulation ...


6

Typical of firestopping, so that (when sheeted with drywall) flames cannot run the full height of the wall inside the stud bay. It would be better to move (up or down a few inches), rather than remove the blocking, for that reason. While it may be unfinished at present, the builders presumably intended that it be ready for drywall if/when you or some other ...


6

The rule is that the studs in any exterior or load-bearing wall may be notched, but no deeper than 25% of the width of the stud, or a hole no bigger than 40% of the width of the stud may be bored in it (you could pass the conduit or cable through the stud). There's an exception that you can notch 60% of the depth if the stud is doubled and no more than two ...


4

Horizontal blocking IS used with 2x lumber on edge for non-structural reasons: grab bar blocking, plumbing fixtures (notably freestanding wall sinks) and kitchen cabinets. Its usually shifted to the front of the wall, just behind the drywall. For sinks, 2x6 is usually used, allowing a range of mounting heights, ditto for grab bars in baths and showers. ...


3

You're using the wrong type of screws. It should be a #7 Pan-Head And Not the self tapping. The self tapping is good for thicker metal studs but the the sharp tip works best for those angle shots you're having trouble with. Use #8 self tapping for the tougher thicker steel studs


3

it doesn't matter, because the stresses on between-stud blocking is 100% horizontal compression. The vertical orientation of the deep face absolutely doesn't matter...though having it horizontal, spanning the full width of the studs would help to prevent torsion/twisting forces, and thus would be ever-so-slightly preferred.


2

Gravity. Everything pulls down. So props that hold things up resist gravity. Vertical members hold things up. Headers are spans that sit on things (jack studs) that hold things up. The header isn't the support, the studs (hopefully tied eventually to foundation elements) are. So, vertical members, including vertical blocking, are the real support. But if ...


2

It's not a "roof frame"; it's a truss. Its purpose is to keep the beam below it straight.



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