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22

Do you have any high powered magnets? like the rare earth neodynium magnets? If so you can probably rub one around the wall until it attaches to one of the nails in the studs. Or you can try thumping on the wall, a stud will sound alot less hollow versus empty drywall. That's how I've searched around in the past.


21

No, it's not ok. For one thing, by the time the city inspector looks at the fully framed building, it will be a little too late to fix it. Secondly, the builder's attitude seems very questionable. Either his framing crew or the concrete sub messed up. At the very least their job is not done in a workmanlike manner. They shouldn't wait and hope things 'slip' ...


19

A variation to the "educated guess exploratory hole method" is to use a small finish nail (longer than the drywall thinkness) and "explore" by nailing that in near the floor boads. If it moves free after hitting it in, you are not in the stud, move 1.5" to the left or right and try again. After you find the stuf, use a level or plumb bob to trace up the ...


17

The 2x4 refers to the rough-cut green wood: it shrinks during drying, then the dried wood is planed smooth, so the finished lumber is supposed to end up at 1.5"x3.5". While it doesn't really shrink that much, the mills get more usable finished 2x4's from a given tree if they cut them slightly smaller to begin with. Here's the Wikipedia article about it.


17

If this is a load-bearing wall you'll want to frame the pet door in, just like you would a window. This will allow you to properly carry the load down, and around the pet door. The king studs should go all the way from the top plate, down to the bottom plate. The header will be made up of 1/2" plywood/OSB, sandwiched between two 2x4s. If you don't want ...


16

Yes, but not just for rigidity. Cement board is made of, well, cement - and cement is brittle. When you screw the cement board in you create a pressure point or stress point. Even though the board is screwed in with lots and lots of screws, each screw hole is a stress point prone to breakage. By gluing the board as well as screwing, you ensure that a ...


13

The reason that joists are sistered using the same height of wood is simply space; generally there's no extra room. If you've got nothing below and there's space then there's no reason you can't use a taller piece of wood. Things to keep in mind: Spanning as much distance as you can so you transfer the load as evenly across the original joist. If it's too ...


11

If you were framing this opening from the start, figure 1 is the way it would be done. I would go that direction so it will make sense to anyone working in this area of your home in the future. Did you consider the possibility of centering the new window horizontally in the existing opening? That may result in a better proportion. In that case I would still ...


11

If the 2X stock is part of the supporting structure such as a wrap or beam attached to a post, it must be secured by a threaded device, not nails unless it is held by a metal support. Local codes vary a lot on this type of connection, but IRC simply calls for a threaded device in applications like this. A through bolt is always a good choice, but sometimes ...


11

You could use one of the many variations of the mortise and tenon joint, depending on the look you're going for. Though I agree with HerrBag, that the strength of a mortise and tenon joint should not rely on glue. Tusk Tenon This is a through tenon variation, where a wedge is used to lock the joint together. Fox tail (Wedged) Tenon This is another ...


10

Roofing nails are a bad choice for attaching sheathing. The wire gauge is too small and the hardness of the nail shank is much less than a framing nail. I personally like to use 6d or 8d ring shank nails for OSB. 8d common nails are Ok as well. Ring nails won't loosen or back out over time as wood dries and shrinks. The heads of the roofing nails can easily ...


10

OK this is easy. The answer is NO. The construction has issues: There are no bolts for the sill plates. 2.The sill plates should be spaced on the slab so that wall plus exterior finish meets slab. It looks like this house is getting brick or thick stone given the 3 inches or so from the edge. I am not sure about your situation. You are having a ...


9

Framing is typically build on top of the subfloor. The finish flooring runs to within about 1/2" of the framing, then the gap is covered by baseboard. The gap is supposed to allow for expansion and contraction of the flooring with changes in temperature and humidity; without the gap, if the wood swells, the only way for it to go is up, i.e. pulling away ...


8

You should always nail your joists to the joist hangers, using the type and quantity of nails recommended by the hanger manufacturer for the type of hangers you're using. Double-shear hangers, the most common type, will have special nail holes designed to direct the joist nails at an angle through the joist and into the ledger or header. Typically you'll ...


8

I thought this would be a fun thing to do (and perhaps set a precedent on diy.stackexchange.com)- post a picture with the results of my question. Thanks to the tips here on this question, as well as another I asked, I have completed my deck project. I ended up with what was described above- a ground-level deck, mostly on the slab. I took Shirlock's ...


8

I'd strongly encourage you to consider metal studs instead of wood for a basement finishing project. There are many reasons. I've outlined my conclusion in this question: Should I use steel or wood studs for basement exterior walls? Either way, though, yes, you want to separate the base plate from the bare concrete. With wood, you want something ...


8

The brace is providing lateral support. If you build a wall with the top and bottom plate plus some studs, it's easy to shift the wall out of square and turn it into a parallelogram. Under load, a house would take an 8' shift to one side and flatten to the ground. With the brace, the wall remains square and holds perpendicular walls plumb. In typical ...


7

Around here they are generally only used in commercial construction or in buildings where flamable building materials like wood are not allowed. Wood is just much easier to work with generally. Some advantages of metal over wood: They don't burn. They are always straight. Easier to run electrical through (come with holes, so no drilling needed). And ...


7

Yes it is. If all your studs are oriented the same way, you'll have a gentle bow to the wall (either in or out) that is more or less consistent across the width of a wall. On the other hand, if you have them so that one stud curves in and the next curves out, you're going to have irregularities in your wall that are the twice the size of the curvature of ...


7

Removing plaster can make tremendous amounts of dust, isolate the area with plastic to cut down on the spread, and get yourself a dust mask and a helmet is a good idea. Cover any cold air returns and heating vents. Once you're prepared, taking plaster walls down is pretty easy, whack it with a hammer to bust a hole, then you can usually get a shovel or ...


7

An easy way to complete a wall like you describe is to build it flat on the floor. That way you can screw or nail the studs to the plates through the plates. I recommend installing a separate plate on the floor or across the upper joists first. Floor usually works best. Then simply measure the shortest dimension from the floor plate you just installed to ...


7

If you have a reciprocating saw (aka "Sawzall") with a metal or demolition blade it should make short work of the nails. Make your cuts at both ends of the vertical studs, between the stud and the header/footer. Once the nails are cut the vertical studs should come right out. You can probably just use a pry bar to pull off the header.


7

Bifold rough openings: to the hinge (pivot ) side add 3/4", to the other other side, 1/4" So for single 24" wide door, a 25" RO (which is really a finished opening for bifolds) is needed. You need a bit more clearance on the pivot side, because the pivot is inboard a bit and it needs clearance to swing through (pivot around) the thickness of the door. ...


7

No, I would not recommend nailing through carpet. Whether or not you prefer to, cutting the carpet and pad and removing them (under the wall) is the only right way to do this job. Baseboards on top of carpet will look like baseboards on top of carpet. If that's not how the rest of the baseboards are done, they will indeed look "off;" especially in the ...


6

You didn't say where you are located, but i figured in a cold area like me in Maine. First of all, 12 inch joist spacing a a waste of time and money. 16 inches will be fine especially if you plan to use 5/4 decking of any type. If you are in a non ground freeze area, just use simple blocking to support the additional 4 foot off the concrete. Assuming you ...


6

Try careful knocking while listening with a stetoscope. Knocks on the studs will sound less hollow.


6

I'd use 2 1/2" No. 8 screws for this (assuming you are screwing through the 2" dimension of the new wood. It will make life easier if you drill pilot holes, but it's not essential if you are using a powered screwdriver. As for the type I've found that deck or chipboard screws seem to have the sharpest thread and so drive quite easily through wood.


6

If you install flooring first, and then frame, you (or anyone else) won't be able to easily replace the flooring in the future. I suggest you frame first, then install flooring.



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