Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I don't live on the beach, but we do live in a desert where the soil is essentially sand. I remember when we were having our house built, like everyone else has alluded to, we had to have the foundation dug very deep to where the soil was actually compacted and poured the foundation from there. The best place to find out about the mixture for your area ...


0

You should consider mudjack to fill the gap. I believe it is a dirt/soil concrete mix. There are contractors who specialize in this type of work.


2

There's typically a drainage system around the inside perimeter of the basement (perimeter drain), which feeds into the sump pit. If the pump is not removing water, the drains will fill just the same as the pit. Water always finds level, so if it's above the rim of the pit, it's also filled the drains. So theoretically, water could seep in anywhere ...


1

Two big risks. One, they excavate properly but do not backfill properly. This will cause settling over time to your foundation. (Highly likely) Two, they do not excavate properly and dirt falls from under your foundation during excavation causing immediate damage (unlikey, but possible) Have them excavate the basement for shotcreting (excavation is held ...


2

Problem #1: You have under-slab ducts. These are bad because they can flood, harbor mold, and increase the dampeness of the house, and let in creepy-crawlies. Problem #2: when it rains, water gets under your slab--and floods the ducts! This means you have very poor drainage and a high water table. The best solution to this problem would be to seal up your ...


3

Instead of patch repair solutions for the ductwork in the foundation, have you considered looking into quotes to add new ductwork along the ceiling of your walkout basement by branching off the ductwork under the house on top of the hill. You could then add ceiling vents that should never have water issues. In the short term, this could be a costlier ...


0

First I don't totally disagree with Tyler but his answer is a bit ridiculous. Only a concrete salesman would tell you to repour your foundation due to hairline cracks in drywall. Maybe the issue has something to do with the foundation shifting seasonally. But all houses move a little throughout weather changes - humidity and temp. It is virtually ...


0

It looks like your house is on a rise (assuming there is no hill hidden behind it in the picture). If that is the case then the water is probably coming in from below, which means there is a high water table there. If there are signs of moisture in the basement, it means flooding is frequent. To prevent this, you would have to build a drain all around the ...


0

Without knowing what the interior drainage is now, it's not obvious that upgrading that will be of much benefit. If it's there, and water is coming through the walls, making more of it will probably not impact what's coming through the walls. If it's not actually defective/failed, replacing it seems like a probable waste of time & money. The exterior ...



Top 50 recent answers are included