New answers tagged

0

you should be able to get the slab mudjacked (its a process where a series of holes are drilled in the slab on the low side, concrete is injected in under the slab and the hydraulic pressure lifts the slab up. when the concrete sets, the slab is permanently lifted the way you want it to be. just do a search for mudjacking in your area.


1

Yep, caulk it and paint it with paintable caulk and exterior paint (after a good "surface prepping"). Use a dark shade to help hide foot scuffs. Don't caulk inside the metal threshold, it probably needs to be able weep water. Just caulk it where it meets the wood, and all around where the wood abuts the building, even if it's not cracked, yet. The problem ...


1

In lieu of expensive underpinning or buttressing, you could use tie-bars and plates. This method is commonly used to strengthen old brick (or other masonry) structures in areas prone to seismic activity. You would drill through the foundation walls below floor level and run several iron tie-bars all the way through, with gusset plates on the outside. On ...


0

A new garage is like five grand... Foundation work on that building has got to come to at least half that, and then you've still got a rotted liability sitting on top of it. If you're going to do it yourself, you're looking at a hell of lot of work, for a building you'd better be in love with or have historical restrictions on. If the foundation is ...


2

here is how we do block wall basement finishing - in almost 30 years i have never had a callback or any complaints about leaks after the fact. you do have to make sure the foundation is in good shape with no failed blocks or footings. 1) hire a foundation waterproofing company to come in and shoot urethane foundation sealer (blueseal is what we use. like ...


0

Unfaced friction-fit fiberglass in R-11 or R-13 will do just fine. If you're concerned about them sagging, staple each batt to the top plate. They won't go anywhere. Depending on your climate, do not apply a vapor retarder over the wall. Let it breathe to avoid mold and mildew.


3

Step one of redoing the slab is pulling those cabinets back out. IMO, only you can define acceptable. 1-2y, eh? So, like anywhere from 5 years to "temporary-permanant"...? Just do it right or the doors won't stay closed and all your carrots will roll off. It'd be easier and better to shim the piecemeal cabinets, instead of the entire counter top along each ...


2

Not sure about inside, maybe damp rid or a dehumidifier. I don't suppose it wouldn't hurt to pack concrete in that gap under the wall/foundation (but you should dig this out from outside first). The truth is, water coming in must be taken care of from the outside. A picture of the outside might be helpful. I understand that you are on bedrock, but just to ...


3

It looks like moisture under the skim coat has caused it to separate. To repair chip off the loose material and add a new skim coat and repaint. If you have a drainage problem this may continue to happen over time as the moisture working its way through the wall is the problem. Make sure all gutters drain away from the foundation. If you have a sump pump try ...


0

A. I. Breveleri provides a good starting point but I'd beef everything up to 2x6s and you'll definitely want some cross members front to back in the top of the stand. As A. I. mentioned you need something to keep the legs from moving. I'd build another frame like the top around the bottom. Since this is for an aquarium being level is VERY important. Not ...


4

I am not a licensed carpenter but I have replaced walls and doors in my old house. Here is how I would do it. I think you should not try to use a cantilevered or bracketed shelf for this. Make a strong table to hold the aquarium. In the following I am assuming wood construction, with your walls made of the usual 2"x4" studs and wallboard. The front ...


0

you are going to have to dig it all out, and then rebuild it properly. you could shore it with steel plates, but it will cost you more to have the system built and then installed than it will to just do it over in concrete.


1

You certainly wouldn't pour dozens of yards of concrete in there. You'd remove the organic soil, fill it with sand, and pour a 4" slab on that after setting up the plumbing. Alternatively, look at an internal drain tile loop, along with some ventilation. It would be fairly easy to trench in perforated and socked pipe inside the footing. The tough part ...


0

First, re-grade & sculpt the yard as well as possible. Mound-up the front to create a dam effect & also create relief gullies along the house sides so surface water can flow readily around the house & can't sit to soak-in. Like, your front door may be a step up from the front walkway, you'd re-grade up to the door threshold & do a flush new ...



Top 50 recent answers are included