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Sevin (carbaryl) is extremely toxic to wasps, hornets, and bees; however, for safety, you want to use something with instant knock down like gasoline, or any can of wasp and hornet killer (which contains petroleum distillates). Gasoline works great (always), but has obvious environmental and fire hazards, and it doesn't leave an insecticidal residue like a ...


1

Wait until dusk or dark when they are less likely to be active. Get as many cans of wasp spray as needed. This depends on how long they have been at this site. It may be easier to enlist help with the spraying. The wasp spray usually manufactured so as to spray with a long forceful stream. This allows you to stand away from the entrance and apply the ...


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I've successfully evicted yellow jackets by coming back at night(when they're dormant) and tossing a tablespoon of moth flakes down the hole. By the end of the next day, they were gone without a trace. If you don't want to get too close to the hole (I didn't), bring a length of 1/2" pipe with you, put one end at the hole, and drop the moth flakes down the ...


2

Without awaiting the rest of your pictures, I'll note that if you are removing the decking you're a hop, skip, and a jump from removing the whole porch (or at least the lower frame) which might make it a lot easier to work on. Temporary roof support during porch work is often done with 2x10's angled out into the lawn beyond the porch. Image Search for "porch ...


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While foam insulation is capable of taking a large pressure, it also has the tendency to compact a bit over time. This would cause some settling of the slab and/or footing above it. Now, settling is not in itself necessarily a problem - but differential settling would be: when rigid foam supports a load, it can suffer from “creep” or deflection. Over 50 ...


1

To meet modern best practice you'd want both ends of any post anchored. Obviously your particular home isn't going to collapse if a post was to fall out (and it's unlikely it could anyway with that small of a gap). To slightly derail the conversation, I'd seriously consider permanent adjustable floor jacks for your purposes. Why not build some future-...


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If you don't simply have the concrete company screed it for you (a good idea), hire a helper for an hour or two so you can screed sensibly from outside the forms. The difference between you walking down the middle of the slab and trying to fill your footsteps and them doing that is that they have some experience with filling footsteps when they HAVE to walk ...


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No never not once in poured concrete. Do not listen to any tales of otherwise. It serves no purpose in poured concrete.


2

The picture that you show is indicating some type of fastener to hold the wood to the brick. That is not really a tool. A tool may very well have been used to install the fastener in the first place. It is difficult to discern the type of fastener that was used from your picture. A close up of the fastener would help but from zooming into your picture it ...


2

One possible solution would be to get a clear plexiglass panel, cut it to size and seal it on the window. You can either build a "dam" blocking the lower half of the window, or seal the whole surface and make it waterproof. Of course, air flow in this case will be completely blocked, which may be a problem (and in some jurisdictions, illegal - where I live ...


2

Short term solution: use solid concrete blocks and polyurethane caulk (like you have between the sidewalk and house.) to build a dam in front of the window. Blocks ar available in various sizes and you could use some 8" ones on edge to build an 8" dam if you think it needs to be that tall. Long term solution: remove part of the sidewalk and install a drain ...



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