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I am not a structural engineer, but I would not recommend using concrete deck blocks to hold up your entire home. These blocks are not great for freestanding structures because they aren't anchored to the ground. Heavy winds may be able to get underneath the yurt and blow it over. The soil below could also rapidly change and cause part of your supports to ...


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You may want to take a look at your roof vents (stacks). There's a plastic boot around the vent that cracks over time. Rain water can leak through & travel down the pipe to the slab. If this seems likely, there's something called a Perma-boot (Home Depot, Lowes, etc.) that you can install yourself. It fits over the existing roof vent boot. Good luck!


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Piles to bedrock (essentially what you are proposing, albeit with really short piles) is an excellent foundation. I'd suggest drilling some holes in the rock so you can pin (with steel rebar) the base of the concrete post/pile into the bedrock. I don't think you'll have any issues with the freezing - it will happen, but the bedrock isn't going anywhere, ...


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You don't construct houses on sand. Sand can't be compacted and, as such, will never be a solid piece of earth to place a foundation on top of. Houses that are built on beaches are typically built upon concrete piers which go down to solid earth under the sand. Ideally bedrock. As for what kind of foundation you need (or are even allowed to have) it will ...


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This is definitely best answered by a local professional, but the UK government has an easy-to-read guide to "Party Wall" law: https://www.gov.uk/party-wall-etc-act-1996-guidance That document includes many FAQs (including the ones you've asked here), sample letters, requirements about giving consent, etc. It's not clear from your question what you're ...


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There are two very important dimensions left out of the "Obstruction Details". See picture below. Overall height of overhead clearance. (Directly related to number of courses of cinder blocks in the wall). Width of the opening. (This is of lesser importance than the overall height). The dimensions I show are just pure guesses based on what one may ...


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Explain the situation to your city's building department and it is likely you can be granted a variance. If you leave the bottom of the brick obstruction unfinished (you can even paint it if you want), there is only a half inch difference of 6' 3.5" compared to the required 6' 4". There is a good chance a variance will be granted.



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