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It looks like your house is on a rise (assuming there is no hill hidden behind it in the picture). If that is the case then the water is probably coming in from below, which means there is a high water table there. If there are signs of moisture in the basement, it means flooding is frequent. To prevent this, you would have to build a drain all around the ...


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Without knowing what the interior drainage is now, it's not obvious that upgrading that will be of much benefit. If it's there, and water is coming through the walls, making more of it will probably not impact what's coming through the walls. If it's not actually defective/failed, replacing it seems like a probable waste of time & money. The exterior ...


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Its the pier size that matters more than the depth.2'in the ground is sufficient, unless there are serious compaction issues. Dig a 12" wide 2'deep hole. Use a post collar to protect the base or crown the concrete. You will only need 135 lbs of concrete and with that still have enough to crown or slope the top. Thats a 90lb pound sack and a half. If you need ...


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Ecnerwal is right that the if the footing is uninsulated, some of the heat will escape into the dirt under the house, where it will sort of be stored due to (I hope) your insulated slab perimeter walls keeping the heat in. However, unless that space is fully insulated on all sides (e.g. under the dirt on the same plane as the footer), there will be heat ...


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If this will be used as a serious heating appliance, (I'm inferring from "masonry heater") not merely decoration (as many fireplaces are), I'd go with uninsulated footing, especially if the stemwall is insulated - whatever thermal bridging takes place will be to the "bubble" of dirt inside the stemwall, which can play into your thermal mass. ...


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My guess about these planks are that a builder made outer walls (that are carrying the loads) first, as well as interior support walls (if any present) and then laid a wooden floor. Just then, he(she?) managed to place internal walls that were not for supportive matters (dividing into rooms) on this floor. Years passed, loads made under-wall-planks to go ...


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When i installed a sump pump in my previous house, to add a sink into the basement, I had it pump up as high as it could, on about a 45 degree angle, then let it run down with the help of gravity to where i want it to discharge.


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Sikaflex or similar is the standard, however that gap seems pretty thin. Is it less than 1/4"? You can get this in a self leveling format or not. My best guess would be to not have the self leveling due to not being able to insert a backer rod to prevent the caulking from dripping too deep into the gap.


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For your second question: You just need a coarse gravel around the drain pipe or tile, not to the grade. Similar to the image provided by iLikeDirt. Ideally, drop a silt filter fabric over that; prevents small particles of dirt from slowly clogging up your pipe system. The IRC asks for 1 foot of gravel out from the wall and 6 inches from the top of the ...


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Current state of the art is a dimpled drainage mat applied against the foundation and lapped over the footing, with a drainage pipe at the bottom to carry off water. The pipes can drain to daylight if there's enough slope on your lot, to a sump pit, or to the sewer/waste plumbing if that's legal in your location. The whole thing looks like this:


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Waterproofing is not important, your house is not supposed to be a boat. What you want is drainage. If drainage is good your whole foundation can be a sieve and it will still be dry as a bone. I have a foundation made out of rocks with 2-inch gaps and cracks in them everywhere and the basement is completely dry. Why? Because it is on a berm and the whole ...



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