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7

There are various degrees of a "zoned" HVAC system. A simple zoned system will include motorized dampers in the ducts to direct air where it is needed. e.g. If one room is too cold, but the other ones are fine, the system will shut the dampers to the other rooms, and then fire up the heater so just the one room is heated. More sophisticated zoning systems ...


6

Since hot rises, upper stories will tend to be warmer unless the design of your air conditioning system properly compensates for it. An energy audit, as mentioned in the comments by @mikes will tell you if you have any reasons for heat gain that may be correctable. Assuming you have a single thermostat that controls a unit that supplies both levels, here ...


5

After a bit of research, (translated: "mad google skills") I found an article claiming that lowering the blower speed may increase efficiency. I'm not completely convinced on this, since the claim is made by a company that sells variable speed blowers for retrofitting HVAC systems. I would think adjusting the heating element would save more energy than ...


5

The reason furnaces (as opposed to heat pumps) keep running is to cool them back off since the burner is pretty hot. It may be a safety issue (too much undistributed heat could make the furnace hot to the touch and possibly result in a fire), but I suspect it's also done to extend the life of the furnace from large temperature swings with the side benefit of ...


5

The past home owner left these in my place. Where the blowing air just gets caught behind the curtains, is under furniture or tropical plants, I divert it, and this just happens to be towards places where people sit. Keep in mind in the winter, having the warm air low helps mix it. But in all seasons, the vents are near windows and doors to counteract the ...


4

If the furnace manufacturer supplies different burners for that unit you may be risking premature failure. The heat exchanger can be overheated and burned out if the blower does not remove enough heat. Proper duct sizing can resolve the issue you are having. Sometimes you have to add more ducts to achieve the proper pressure and velocity.


4

One of my rental homes that was build about 3 years ago has a Honeywell thermostat system that zones. There is one air handler/AC/heater, a thermostat on the first floor, as thermostat on the second floor, electronic dampers in the duct work in the attic, and a controller in the mechanical room that connects to the thermostats, air handler, and dampers. see ...


4

Looking at the specifications on the page you linked to, it appears to be made of the same basic materials as other duct tapes: plastic coated fabric with a rubber adhesive. Premium Grade it may be, but I think you'll run into the same problems -- it'll get brittle and crack with age. I've used aluminum foil tape where I've needed spot repairs; Home ...


3

Yes. I was building a new home in Baytown Texas (completed in 2006) and searched far and wide for thermostat controlled dampers - was told by many HVAC companies that "they" remove them weekly - this isn't true. I found one installer in Houston that would do the system the way I suggested - he listened and so did I. We compromised on 2 units with 3 ...


3

They're not controlled by the thermostat, but these vents are fairly cheap and can be set up to close/open on a schedule.


3

Speaking strictly from an performance perspective, it would be very difficult (neigh impossible) to set up a good variable air volume HVAC system if your furnace runs at a fixed speed. As a hack - you could certainly set up a damper system with actuators controlling to a room temperature setpoint with no other changes to your HVAC configuration. However, ...


2

If you're technically inclined, I saw one post hovering round the tubes about a guy that did some home automation - namely zoning, via 2 wire temperature sensors for the rooms, servo motors to control the registers, and a Linux box to rule them all. Of course I can't find the link now that I look for it...


2

Another supplier (I have no connection to them beyond them being based in my home state, which is how I know about them): Home Comfort Zones


2

I've never seem them in action before, but apparently people do make them. Every time I've seen multi-zone heating in a house, it's always been boiler based.


2

Empirical Engineering Answers: Yes: you will save electricity costs by running your blower on low. No: you will not save on gas/oil costs by running your blower on low. Because the slower air velocity over the heat element is transferring fewer BTU units into the circulated air and they simply go up the exhaust pipe. The NET difference of the above two ...


1

It definitely sounds like that section of duct has a leak or travels through an un-insulated part of the structure. Sometimes the cavities between walls or under floor joists are used as duct or returns and they are not enclosed. Leaks in the building envelope, especially with such cold weather, could keep that area cold all the time and any warm air blowing ...



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