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Obviously starting and ending with a full plank is ideal, however, it almost never works out that way. You'll want to avoid installing skinny little pieces of a plank (less than half a plank), so you'll have to make some calculations up front. Measure the distance from wall A to wall D, then based on the width of your planks determine how many rows you'll ...


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Run it lengthwise down the hall and the same direction in the living room at the end. That way you can do it without using a transition between the two. Rooms that are seperated by a door can be run any direction because you'll used a transiton there. As to the the recommendation of running it paralelle to window or light source, I ignored that because mine ...


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When tasked with the a similar problem, I chose to square the wall up with the existing framing. My wall was out of plum, and out of square - I shimmed it floor to ceiling, corner to corner.


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That looks like nearly 3/4 inch in a 2 foot run. That is a lot of angle, and I think most carpenters would consider it unacceptable on a new framing job (unless there were some underlying issue, like a pipe or an old beam preventing a square outcome). But it also sounds like your contractor is challenged when it comes to getting something square. You can ...


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I'd vote #4 = fewest cuts, least amount of labor, least amount of waste. It's also see as the 'default' as most argue that floors look best when laid in the direction parallel to widest walls. For real hardwood, the general rule of thumb is to lay it perpendicular to the floor joists. This is to add strength. It probably adds a little strength to laminate ...


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It has a possibility of getting worse or the popping could be done. It's hard to say one way or the other.


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I ran into the same thing. In some cases it looks OK for the wood to but up next to the threshold. If the doors are metal, like exterior doors sometimes are, then they can't be cut. You have to remove the whole frame and raise them by adding a spacer underneath. I recommend pressure treated plywood. I have done one door and have 3 more to go. If they are ...


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I feel that you should dive a bit deeper and resolve the root cause of your problem. 2" of subsidence seems to indicate a bit more work than simply using a self leveling material, you have support/foundation problems. Consult a professional foundation remediation contractor to see if you can get an idea of what the cause is. I would hate to see you "level" ...


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It can be hard to find someone to do specialty work like this. Typically when it is a specialized project, you simply need to find a sub who can complete the task proficiently. This may be a concrete contractor (larger areas), a flooring contractor (smaller areas), or a general contractor who has an arsenal of subs that they are familiar with and could ...


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If the batts have a paper facing, that's not actually a vapor barrier, it's vapor retarder, and you'll be fine. If instead, the facer is plastic or aluminum, or there's a sheet of polyethylene sealing the floor, then yes those would be vapor barriers and you would have a problem. Solution: remove the vapor barrier.


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I have a basement floor that is concrete. When we finished it off, we used a product called DriCore as the sub floor. This is a plywood with a plastic bottom. It's specifically designed for basements, and it raises the floor a little bit. The disadvantage is that you essentially do the floor twice. :) Also the cost is higher. With that said I have ...


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Such an old question... Well, I'm not satisfied with all these answers, so I put mine. I'll try to wrap most of them together. General answer is: YES, You can. But, as with everything on this world, come pros and cons of such operation. pouring concrete on particle board isn't a good idea without any isolation (like a foil); concrete is wet (when ...


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Lacking a specific brand from your question, I went and looked at http://www.screwfix.com/p/mapei-ultraplan-self-levelling-compound-grey-25kg/4959f Which states that it will cover (mixed) 6 square meters at 3mm thick. I make that 100cm x 600 cm x 0.3 cm or 18,000 cubic centimeters. Last I checked, 1000 CCs was a liter, so you have 6 liters of free space. ...


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That bucket is far too small. Normally, you want to get a "concrete mixing tub" (e.g., at Home Depot), which is broad enough to allow you to mix the water and the powder thoroughly. I usually use a garden hoe to do the mixing, which allows you to do it standing up. Also, the tub is very smooth on the bottom, which means that it's relatively easy to drag ...


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The crack in the basement floor looks like it goes under the wood as well. Cracks in foundations tend to let water in. Water + wood = mold. I hope you have sufficient crack repairs done and an underlay in place that will help to prevent moisture transfer into the wood floor, but most options I am aware of would make the wood floor match up closer in height ...


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Engineered hardwoord are almost always prefinished. And the factory aluminum oxide coating is harder than anything you can do at home so there is no reason to re-do the existing coating.


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Ditra is excellent, why not use a transition strip from the tile to the hardwood. You can get them in marble, stone or metal and they are perfect for situations like this. You don't want to be tearing up the cracked tiles in 1 year.


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Use a thinner crack isolation sheet, ask for "slip-sheet" at the tile store. Some will bridge cracks up to 1/8" wide. Note, although slip-sheet works great for cracks caused by horizontal movement, they are not great for preventing cracks caused by vertical movement.



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