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2

Really hot water. Have tons of towels and buckets handy so water does sit long. Repeat until it comes up.


3

Well you are lucky because of those patio doors. What do I expect to see by patio doors - TILE! So: Go out and find some faux travertine (or the real stuff) tile. It looks like you need some 12"x12"s. Measure 24.5 inches from door all the way across. Cut out laminate with circular saw. (several saw types will work here) Glue a tile edging strip about 1/...


0

You don't have to do anything. Most laminate installs have a soft spot somewhere. I also don't think the soft spot will change. You either accept it or fix it. I am not saying you had a "great" install but it is what it is. If you are going to pull it up - you need to do a big enough area where it can be properly leveled. For issues like this we use a ...


2

I have seen vinyl floors where the glue was put down unevenly (sparingly in some areas), and by comparison the areas without enough glue were visibly damaged on top from wear. So, I think that (for whatever reason) vinyl floors which are not (well) attached have a shorter lifespan. However, you might want to look into floating vinyl floors (here's a random ...


1

If you're not going to use a 2-pack epoxy, don't paint your floor. You'll hate yourself later. A 2-pack is a paint-like product that comes in 2 cans, you mix it in a certain proportion, and you have a limited time to apply it. Regular paint will fail. And I don't mean "will come off in nice sheets you can peel up, oh no. Other than the failing spots, ...


1

In general, floating surfaces can be louder when you walk on them. This is more noticable on subflooring that is rough or uneven. The sound can be clicking/slapping/hollow sounds. Depending on the underlayment, the floor can feel springier than glued or nailed flooring. I recommend having an installer do glue-down on concrete subfloor, or nail-down on a ...


2

This completely depends on your expectations. I paint my room every 5-6 years with the basic grey basement paint. It scratches, you mop with hot water or bleach, it peels. Not too bad but after a few years it doesn't look perfect, but certainly better than the dirty, rusty concrete that was there before it. And I have a full squat rack and 800 pounds ...


0

The 2-part epoxy is a fantastic sealer, and is almost impervious to conventional weapons. You won't regret the additional expense, and it's a safe bet that the room might be unfinished longer than planned. If you can swing it, the epoxy is a great idea in terms of making the basement room behave much more like a normal above-ground room. You might save ...


0

The Masonite coverage was sufficient that replacement was not trivial. Since this is an apartment and not my own home, cost was a factor. The first good thing I did was take out those pieces which had water damage as no solution seemed to make good in that case. The board is just brittle and flakey, so it's not a matter of sticking, but of simple falling ...


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The closest answer was #3. The question had 2 parts: The first part answer is: Yes, we can glue 2 solid oak treads to make one tread of minimum thickness 1½" when stair steps more than 39" width. If the steps are less than 39" wide then we can use 1" thick treads. The second part of the question was HOW WOULD YOU DO IT? The answer is to: Rough ...


1

why dont you just buy 10/4 rough sawn oak and plane it down to 2"? this is a totally normal day for most staircase guys. i am kind of surprised you are asking this question.


0

I am a woodworker and I can tell you 2 glued up pieces would be just as strong. I don't know about code though. Keep in mind, surfaced 1X oak is actually 13/16" thick. 2 of them would be 1-5/8" thick. 1x stair treads might be actual 1" thick.



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