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1

As an installer, I have done many jobs where my client just didn't want a T-mold in the door ways. When I first started installing laminate, all the sides were glued together. This is where we always used T-molds. Cutting Door Jambs 1These days they sell 10, 12 and 14mm thick laminate. These thicker products from what I have seen do not seem to grow or ...


2

Your second and third photos show where the thin piece of wood that is used to cover the end of the toe kick should be cut to the height of the quarter round. Before I install the quarter round I use a scrap piece of quarter round and a saw or an oscillating tool and cut them to the right height. Heres 2 photosenter link description here


1

I agree that running parallel to the longest wall is the best installation method. This will make the room look larger as well. Its funny that laminate gets bashed for being cheap flooring and the answer is engineered? I have used both and the laminate held up much better. You cant leave standing water on it but with two kids and a dog I had no issues when ...


3

This is the order that works well for me. Subfloor Framing & Drywall Underlayment Door Casings Finished Floor (undercut the casings to the finished floor height) Baseboards (If you are carpeting put baseboards down before carpet.)


1

Using glass on a walking surface is not recommended due to slipping. Having said that you could use glass tile and a clear silicon adhesive.


1

Use bulletproof glass. It's designed to withstand stress. Don't use laminated glass. It is susceptible to chipping. Bulletproof isn't because it's not actual glass; it's more like plexiglass or Lexan™.


2

I am a professional floor covering installer with 30 years of experience. I have 18 employees, and do all commercial work. I am a Forbo Master Mechanic. And the list goes on. Almost all manufacturers state that you must install any new floor on a properly prepared substrate directly for your new floor to be covered under any warranty. In California it is ...


16

That's the worst job I've ever seen at installing quarter round. As others have said, your installer was incredibly lazy. There are several different techniques that could be used for terminating the corner rounds in both the corners and at the ends. A simple 45° miter is the simplest for both inside and outside corners. If you want to get fancy, you can ...


7

I agree with ILikeDirt; This installation is awful. I think the best thing to do is to remove all of the quarter round around the cabinets. To fill the gaps, try to use a sanded caulk that is roughly the same color as your grout. It should setup fine and stay looking good for a number of years. One thing you will want to make sure to do is tape off the area ...


14

Exceptionally unprofessional work. The quarter rounds should be mitered together at a minimum. They're not even touching at all in your second and third pictures. It's just cosmetic, though. Not gonna hurt anything except your aesthetic preferences.


2

I wouldn't recommend a quick-fix. There's probably a fair amount of mold between the tile and the pan, and if that's the case, you don't want to attempt the fix yourself unless you're qualified for mold mitigation.


0

Pick up any Dwell issue and you will see plywood floors all over the place. No real cons other than style taste but realize you still need to 'finish' the floor by proper sanding, nail/screw setting and finish. One potential con is that you can't resand and refinish plywood floors more than once or twice. The top layer is just not thick enough.


4

I'm guessing you're in the UK, right? If so, the cause is probably rising damp. Likely your cottage has no damp-proof course between the foundation and the floor and walls. So moisture is simply constantly trying to push its way into your house. The true solution is to radically improve the waterproofing and drainage of the cottage. This is probably not a ...


0

The general rule is that anything permanent or structural should be built into the sub floor and the floor built around it. Anything temporary or unattached, like a dishwasher, should go on top of the floor. For cabinets it depends how they are mounted. Base cabinets are usually mounted to the wall, but their bottom framing is usually meant to be flush ...


0

This is mostly a personal choice. With linoleum, the only difference would be in spending the extra money on additional materials to put it under the dishwasher versus just far enough to look good. I recommend doing the countertops before the linoleum only because gravity pulls dirt down - why have the countertop people mess up a brand new floor when you can ...


0

Cabinets (without the decorative toe kick panel yet), then linoleum, then countertops, then dishwasher, then toe kicks.


1

If all the joists are accessible as the picture suggests, I would release the hanger and reset the joist to the proper level as it was originally intended. When the house was first built it may have been flush then, but shrinkage occurred. I have seen 2X12s shrink 1/4" t0 3/8" in new home construction. This would be no exception. Not to rag on anybody ...


1

Rather than jacking up the joists it may be easier to sister some 2x6's onto the sides of the floor joists where the mismatches are noticed. These could be wedged into place and then fastened into place on the joist sides. The better way to secure the sistered members will be to apply construction adhesive to the mating faces of the lumber and then securely ...



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