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0

You did hear correctly: the floor must be as flat as possible (and as rigid) in order to support the tile. You mentioned the floor being supported on posts. If there is enough head room a better repair is to shim-up the low spot from below. Depending on how severe the floor depression is this may entail hammering some store bought shims under the joists or ...


-1

The concrete board and extra mud will be all you need. Lay the concrete board, then fill in where needed.


1

If that is what you would like for your floor material than you should install wood flooring. Depending on what type of flooring will determine its longevity and maintenance schedule. Solid wood strips 3/4" thick will need to be sealed with a urethane type coating in several built up applications and then occasionally resealed. Wood laminate can be installed ...


1

TL:DR - It can be done, but requires extra attention and caution I grew up in a house that had hardwood in pretty much every room except the basement. Hardwood is more tolerable in places like a "powder room" or half-bath, since you don't get the additional exposure to moisture associated with a shower or similar. Even well sealed, manufactured, hardwood, ...


3

This is not a DIY job. Mold can spread everywhere in a wood-framed house full of drywall. Call in the pros to estimate the source and extent of the infection. Simply killing the mold won't help if you don't find the moisture source that made it moldy in the first place. PSA to the world: stop building houses out of wood and drywall. Sheesh, what awful ...


0

Get the dimensions you need first, then judge by looks. My guess is that the roofing boards would be lower grade (ie, more knotty) than floor boards.


1

Can you do it: yes. Will it come back to bite you: probably yes. Trapping wood between two cement building layers, in my opinion is asking for problems. If there is any moisture wicking through that cement slab it will be trapped beneath your tile in the wood - Do the work and scrape that floor. I have spent days scraping a floor to prep for tile ...


-1

Don't cut the brick. It will never look OK. Leave a gap and use molding to cover the gap.


3

Sorry to say this, but number 3 really is your only option. First the reasons why: I can tell just by looking and from your description, your subfloor is rotten and now unstable. More tiles and grout are going to crack, come up. The mould is almost certainly inside the sub-floor and maybe even the jousts. Cleaning the surface will very likely not do much ...


1

I've worked in the floor covering business for several years and here is a good quick way to remove glued carpet padding: after slicing the padding in half length-wise with a utility knife pull up as much as possible. Padding usually is made into 5 foot rolls. Halving it makes it slightly easier to pull up. The installer will normally apply the glue from a ...


0

Sometimes you can tell by looking under the dishwasher. Most have a plate that either moves or can be unscrewed. Then, you can sometimes look at the edges. Also, you can sometimes tell my walking on floors...if it's a floating floor, no it should only go up to cabinets (or if it's underneath it's done improperly and you may have other issues. If you are ...


1

I would either get some sort of "mat" or area rug. There are some plastic mats that are sold without the plastic spikes. There are also 'floating vinyls" or fiber floors that come in rolls (often at Home Depot) and they can just go on top of floor without adhesive. You can cut them to size. Usually, their weight holds them down.


1

As others have mentioned, you won't know until you rip up the carpet. Of the floors need to be sanded due to holes from tack strips and/or staples. But, sometimes you are lucky and can do a screen and recoat. That's when you buff the floors and just add a coat or two of poly. I would recommend calling a local hardwood place as they can advise you and do ...


0

Just make sure the cement board is out from the outer part of the tub. It being uneven underneath is not consequential. You just need your cement board to be able to lay flat and I usually place mine about 1/8" from tub.


1

No, if the plywood is sound, clean, and flat, it's a perfect surface (unless the built-up layers cause your finished tile floor to sit too high).


0

A mastic remover is available that is nontoxic and it smells like oranges, but I can't for the life of me recall the name. But it is a citrus base and nonflammable.


1

First, this doesn't look like like solid wood flooring. At best, this is an engineering wood flooring (plywood). Mostly likely, since there are 3 boards to a plank, this is a laminate floor. Second, the finish, in general, is in really bad shape. Any type of spot refinishing is just going to stick out, maybe as bad as the damage you are trying to cover. ...


0

My dad & I installed Hardwood while I was a teenager. We worked with another guy to finish it. He would get a putty and go over the whole floor with it. I would say with those gouges you can try to sand out the dark outlines and fill with some putty. Their odd shape and form will make them stand out a bit but it's better than paint. If you get a putty to ...


0

it may sound crazy but if never done before, take pic , pull it up & flip boards. choose any color you like, lightly sand, stain, put wood back ( remember to stager boards & keep same gap as original ) lightly sand ( i prefer fine steel wool. ) mysel, a friend works in graphics industry, designed & produced .a large HARLEY DAVIDSON BAR ...


1

I agree with keshlam. All you need to do is screw it down. On a normal tile install you seal the the subfloor and screw down the backer-board so this would be no different, the linoleum is just sandwiched between the sub and the hardy. The only down fall is you cant really seal it.


0

I don't think adhesive would be needed or helpful; what's really holding the backerboard in place are the screws into the subfloor. The linoleum gets buried and becomes mostly irrelevant.


0

I also like this 'Look' however having always though out of the box. I ripped up my carpet in my creative office space. I found the contractors sprayed the trim (a dark walnut) while still on the wall. They wrote measure ya and numbers etc in the floor- Very common practice. They left an ombré of stain around the room. I loved it! I wrote 'Beauty in ...


0

Obviously starting and ending with a full plank is ideal, however, it almost never works out that way. You'll want to avoid installing skinny little pieces of a plank (less than half a plank), so you'll have to make some calculations up front. Measure the distance from wall A to wall D, then based on the width of your planks determine how many rows you'll ...



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