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I'm hoping you haven't paid yet. I don't think any manufacturer would consider this acceptable. (You could call their tech support just for laughs and see what they say.) At the end of the day, manufacturer's specifications are what matter. So let's assume you have a sub-standard job. Off the top of my head, here's a few options: 1- tear it out and do ...


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If height is an issue, use 1/4" concrete backer board, screwed and glued down on your floor. Be sure to use backer board screws and alternate seams so tiles won't crack or shift. If height is not an issue, use 1/2". Then, thinset your tiles on the backer board. There shouldn't be any issue with the 12" cabinet. You could use a taller cabinet to create a ...


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You could use vinyl but you would have to use a 2 part epoxy adhesive if you go onto Altro web site and speak to there technical team ask them questions they will tell you what to do I'm from England but I fit flooring for a living and we have to do flooring in walkin freezers sometimes and we fit Altro 2.5mm anti slip with Altro A19 epoxy adhesive if they ...


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2 part epoxy paints are the toughest for garage floors. The floor paint in 1 can really has not held up well for those I know that have used it. The 1 part stuff pulls up where the tires sit. I had a 3 bay shop with a 33' motor home in 1 bay and 3500 diesel truck in another and the floor looked great after 8-10 years when I sold the place. some of the big ...


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If you're really really into a solution here, you want a Flexible Glass Chair Mat. It's that: glass you lay on the floor to protect it. Just Google that term. The first results lead to solutions.


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no - but it depends on the installation. if the vinyl is in good shape (not loose or coming off in big chunks) then you can leave it. also, try driving a few staples into the floor. if it breaks into chunks or fractures (as oposed to just sinking in and holding), then you will have to pull it up. next: 1) staple metal lath down over the whole area, ...


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There's usually some type of underlayment beneath the vinyl. When I did my kitchen floor, it had luan board. I would remove the vinyl. You really just need to remove the luan board and the vinyl comes for the ride. Then you can put down cement backerboard or even the rubber membrane. Unfortunately/fortunately, the luan board is stapled down, which is ...


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Laminate flooring can hold water for a long period of time. While a moisture barrier is intended to prevent moisture from moving from the subfloor to the laminate, it also will hold water on top of it. If you have a crawl space under that part of the flooring, it is definitely advisable to perform a visual inspection. From your photo, I can't tell if the ...


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I doubt it qas from rhe cleaning unless standing water or harsh chemicals were involved. Find out what chemicals were used to clean the flooring. Some (all?) laminate flooring is very susceptible to chemicals and recommend either only water or special cleaner. IMO, This is most likely a moisture problem. Check any and all sources of water near the ...


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Self-adhesive tiles bond well if the surface is prepared well. If you can strip it chemically and apply a bonding primer you shouldn't have problems. To install vinyl sheet over vinyl you should usually level the existing embossing using, get this, an embossing leveler. You simply trowel it onto/into the texture of the old floor to make it flat. This ...


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Couple ideas come to mind: Focus near windows, this is the typical location of an HVAC vent. Compare the room with others to find common locations, spacing from the wall, and typical number of vents in the room. If you believe you have located it, a deep sensing stud finder may identify edges of the vent if you start in the middle. Try loud sound/music ...


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If anything, I would expect the opposite problem: the area under the rug would wear less, and be noticeable when you take up the rug for that reason (if at all)! Assuming the rug is color-fast, of course.


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A tile mosaic laid at an angle so as to "ramp" up to the height of the floor wood look nice.


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Before attempting any sort of repairs to the house, I would first try to verify if the issue is with the house or the machine. Take the machine outside somewhere that you have a concrete pad (patio/driveway/etc). Make sure it is level and run a garden hose to the cold water. Then run it on cold without soap (so you don't have to deal with any sort of ...


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this is a common problem and is most easily remedied by one of two approaches (and this is entirely assuming the unit is in good working order and the harmonic balancer is in good shape and balance) 1) restrain the unit - just mount angle iron or wood or whatever around the base to keep it from moving. just ensure that you have a thick foam pad or strip ...


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Rubber tile or mat would be one simple approach - see duckboards for another method/approach in polymers or sometimes treated wood. Given a solid, correctly sloped concrete substrate, pressure-treated 2x4 sleepers and a deck with no posts, etc. should work just fine - the 2x4's can even be laid flat, since the concrete deck is taking the load directly. ...


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Use a pancake air compressor and a air chisel with a wide chisel blade. Use ear protection, knee pads and goggles! No gum mess or chemicals to clean up. Lowes sales the air chisel for $30.00. I already had the wide chisel blade. You can rent, beg, borrow or steal the pan cake compressor ( stealing should be your last option) 😀.


2

I'm surprised no one has mentioned this but based on the statement: I had a french drain installed it seems to me like if you paid someone (assumption here) to install a drain and they left it in a state where it is going to cause a puddle to form before water is able to drain into it, that it should be the company's responsibility at this point. At ...


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If it's a small area around the drain, the lowest cost, least-fuss option is one of these grinding blocks (use with some water and you can mop the slurry up rather than deal with dust in the air. Plug the floor drain first.) The one with the grooves is most applicable.


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A big 7" angle grinder with a diamond cup bit would work nicely. You can also get away with the 'masonry grinding' bit sold at big box stores. You should try to get a dust shroud as well, as even a small amount of concrete grinding will send fine dust everywhere.


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From the description, I suggest renting a proper concrete grinder (bottom of the page) from your local rental shop or big box. This will allow finer control and result in a flatter, smoother surface than if you attempted to use abrasive or diamond-bitted handheld power tools. If you'd rather not go that far, an angle grinder with an appropriate disk would ...


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You already answered why; the poly that was put down is peeling off! My parents tried to use poly on a new pine floor when I was a child. It peeled and chipped and wore off in areas after about 2 years. I suspect (now) that the difference in rigidity was the primary reason for the separation of varnish (hard) and pine (soft). Surface finishes like varnish ...


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I always go with carpet in basement =bad. But if you are confident there will be no moisture issues, OK. Honestly the laminate is not that bad, meaning once you start at one end, it all just kind of folds up. It is interlocking and not glued or nailed so you could probably handle that yourself. It would also give you a chance to see and moisture proof the ...


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Give the history you know of with the home, it's probably not a concern. I'd ask the carpet manufacturer how it affects your warranty, though. As easy as laminate is to remove, it might be worth doing. One drawback to the adhesive tiles--if your basement floods you can't lift the carpet to dry things and salvage it. I've been involved with several basement ...


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I have been researching this same question because I have about 1000 sqft of hardwood floors that have been covered by linoleum tile, carpet adhesive, paint overspray, and vinyl flooring glue. I found a few solutions on the internet and am going to try them this week. The most promising options I've seen are: Hand scrape with a solvent that will not stain ...


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In some areas, you can get away without having grout, but the tiles will be more susceptible to damage because grout (or something) adds strength to the floor (and keeps the tiles in place). You may have seen or heard about how some people make really tight fittings with beveled tile, and they don't use grout. This is more for areas that are onramental or ...



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