Tag Info

New answers tagged

5

There are two ways to install flooring in areas of different heights. The cheapest and easiest method is to install transition pieces or thresholds between the areas of different heights. These transitions are available in different matching shapes and heights for most laminates. Common use is to join carpeted, tiled or other floors, to new flooring height. ...


1

It is possible most of your flooring can be salvaged. I see a small area where it might not be able to but this depends of the install. If the tongue/groove are glued you have almost no chance of pulling the board apart for reuse but if they are just "locked" then you are better off. The key is that I would under no circumstance lay anything on that floor ...


7

Your problem is obvious. Moisture is migrating up from the slab. I don't imagine anyone suggested to do a moisture check on the concrete before you started? There are meters that can measure the % of moisture in concrete. With that said, it is never a good idea to put wood or laminate directly on concrete slabs or uncured concrete upper floors. In your ...


0

Usually it is either glue or nail. In commercial or apartment building you would often have concrete floors. You would glue down hardwood in these areas. Given that the building is temperature controlled, the concrete would have very little seasonal movement. In a residential setting you can glue down hardwood - this is really a call the manufacturer ...


3

Caulking from vinyl to quarter round isn't a very long-term solution. The quarter round is small and flexible, the area is dirty, it sees a lot of traffic, it gets dirty. The caulk will fail within a year or two of use and have to be scraped and redone. Putting the flooring under the quarter round with no caulk is a much better solution.


0

If you choose to use plywood, go with the 3/4" T&G for the layer under the carpet. The trough were the heat pipes used to be can be spanned by the 3/4" plywood too. Also since the carpet compresses under foot, keep the plywood below the hardwood layer about 3/8" or so lower. That way when you step there, the transition will feel level.


2

I was only going to post a comment, since both members covered tile transitions, but I seen that the laminate floor transition has not been addressed. I will also throw my 2 cents on the tile transition too. The transition to the tile to wood has been well answered by both members above. Ecnerwal eluded to what I will mention. The joint between the tile ...


1

I have done transitions that just consist of an extremely clean edge, with surface heights matched. In my case I was butting tile to solid-wood parquet, so the actual wood movement is very limited. Likewise, most solid hardwod floors will (unless laid very tightly, very dry) simply open and close gaps between boards (one reason narrow boards are more common ...


2

Solid hardwood is a tough one because unlike the other materials, it expands and shrinks. Laminate and especially engineered hardwoods with a plywood core are much more stable, but they will still expand and shrink a little bit. Certainly more than tile! I'm in the middle of installing plywood core engineered hardwood in my own house and I have tile ...


0

There's actually no need to level the subfloor to install a hardwood or laminate floor. The subfloor needs to be flat, not level. Now, leveling out the floor may have other benefits, of course. But, strictly speaking, it isn't necessary for the type of flooring you want to install.


0

Self-levelling underlayment (or floor leveling compound) - basically runny, usually gypsum - based cement product. Read the label before buying - get one that can manage the depth you need, or figure out how many layers you'll need to pour it in - some can be poured full-depth, others may need to be 1/2 inch or 1 cm at a time. One example (image from US ...


1

Anything like that. Shooting glue has been tried it can work. On larger ones cutting some carpet with one straight cut then folding it back glue it then re-seam the smaller cut glue the seam with seam glue. Find a wet set carpet glue that allows for both ideas. You risk a blemish but at least it's not a tripping hazzard



Top 50 recent answers are included