Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

You should be fine in terms of compressional strength, the more important issue is the point stress load. If the heater has feet of some kind they might punch right through your plywood if they're not over a joist. If you want to be safe you could cut out a square in the floor the size of the heaters footprint, then install blocking around the holes opening ...


1

I consider myself more than handy and I would still hire carpet guys for a new instillation (if for some reason I wanted installed carpet). You ever use one of those knee things? pfft. You are however, looking at a carpet repair. So long as you don't over cut the carpet, you can give it a go. Call guys in if you have unsatisfactory results. Consider dong ...


3

No that quote is too high, especially the 300 side of the quote. You are paying a company, not the installer who gets less than half of that. You should seek out an installer and be able to get that done for ~100, which is reasonable. Doing the job yourself will be a little more difficult than you might want to get involved in. First you need to get the ...


0

If you currently have radiant heat via big old-fashioned radiators fed with dedicated hot water plumbing from a boiler, here are your options, ranked in terms of cost-effectiveness: Do nothing if the system works fine. Improve the aesthetics of the radiators. Paint them, hide them behind decorative metal grillework, etc. Replace the large bulky radiators ...


0

Laminate flooring is intended to survive reasonable moisture that might be spilled. Moisture should be mopped up as soon as possible on any floor. If there were significant flooding, the laminate (and almost any real wood floor) would be at risk of damage beyond repair. Almost no floor is truly waterproof.


2

If it were me I would give serious thought to replacing both with engineered hardwood flooring. If your pine were in perfect shape and properly installed it would be worth trying to save and match it. But if it's not nailed down as you mentioned you can't hope to sand it out with any consistency and if it's very old you might have trouble matching the ...


2

If this is what you mean by parquet, I don't suggest it. If water ever penetrates (which it will if spilled on) this floor is over with. That real wood you have there is gorgeous. Refinish it by sanding, stain if you want and varnish it with a lamb's wool mop, using oil-based products. Replace the vinyl with as close a match as possible (same plank width, ...


0

Strip the old with a flat spade shovel or similar and put down ceramic tile that is cheap and hides dust with a satin finish. The flatter the surface, the bigger your ceramic tiles can be up from 12 to 16". Gap each piece with as small a gap that you can keep straight without notice. Notice the gap in car doors is smaller these days due process control. I ...


0

I'm not experienced enough with tile to answer the question directly but have you considered other floor coverings? They make engineered wood that is rated for below grade that will float above the old mastic. As long as the mastic is generally smooth (no ridges between the old tiles) it will go down just fine. Cost is about the same but if you have a ...


0

An electric tile chipper with a 8-12" sharp blade can be rented cheaply to do the job. Dust level is low but Work with masks and forced window exhaust. It's like a cross between a jack hammer and a sideburn shaver and easy to use . 1 hr to separate from concrete . 1hr to haul out. 1hr to rental place and back. for 500 sq ft. If it is smooth enough, extra ...


1

I'm surprised anyone successfully used nails in concrete. If they can't be pulled out with the normal tools, I'd grind off any protruding portion using an angle grinder or a Dremel/rotary-tool. I believe you'd need to seal or prime the concrete before applying adhesive. You need to use a sealant that is compatible with the adhesive. You might need to use ...


-1

I did my living room floor last year. Pulled up the nasty carpet where I found thick white paint all over these beautiful hardwoods. I learned everything I did on you tube and I was at Home Depot almost everyday. My floor turned out AMAZING! Im now as we speak doing my bedroom, and redoing my hallway. Be careful sanding because the stain will look horrible ...


0

Yes. I'm sitting on a foam hardwood sandwich now. The hardwood should float on the foam. And beware of dual vapor barriers: your foam is impermeable and should probably be your only vapor barrier.


0

After some thinking I decided that I need to give this job to a pro, from what you guys have described it requires careful planning and coordination with what happens in other rooms and I might not be able to get it straight besides this it seems that the job will require subfloor and that will affect the height of the doors (I already have enough trouble ...


0

I think a quality bathroom installation includes waterproofing and an isolation membrane. I'm a fan of Schluter's Ditra underlayment, but there are other good options out there. A typical installation has 1/4" backer board glued down with thinset and screwed down, the isolation membrane installed with thinset (and taped if necessary), and then the tile ...


0

You mentioned subfloor. Did you mean primary floor? The first floor placed on the joists is called a primary floor. Every plywood floor on top of that is called a subfloor. It's reversed, like being in the basement looking up. If you have a subfloor, take a medium sized pry bar and hammer to get an edge up. Finish prying the board up with a long steel bar ...


4

Utterly standard - the subfloor goes on, then the walls go up. Doing it any other way is rather fraught with difficulties to no benefit. You've got the general idea, though it is not really critical on the cross-joist direction (as pictured) and often the parallel to the joist direction is solved by putting blocking between the exposed joist and the hidden ...


5

The way we lay flooring is to use subfloor adhesive and lay a bead down the whole length of the groove. You wedge it together till the gap totally closes. Doing this in addition to using tongue and groove plywood/OSB accomplishes two things: You have an airtight floor membrane. This gets rid of heat loss and also the intrusion of moist damp air possibly ...


3

For purposes of this discusion, Top, Bottom, Left, Right are oriented to the drawing. I've done my share of flooring, and one thing I found out is that working backwards is a pain. You can lay boards perpendicular to each other if they have the same tongue and groove on the ends as along the length. -- But only at your starting end. At the finishing end, ...


1

For ease of installation you should start in either the Living Room or the Office. My personal preference would be to start in the Living Room on the left wall in your picture and move across the house to the right. Once you get to the bedrooms use full boards that penetrate into the room. Work your way to the closest wall with out going totally across ...


2

Tongue and groove products offer extra stability at joints. It reduces movement and helps avoid uneven points in the sub-flooring where two pieces come together. Not sure what you mean by "Does it protect against leaks"


3

The biggest reason I can think of is due to the weight that it may have to withstand. Tongue and groove gives added support at the seems and makes for a more solid floor. If it was not tongue and groove, you could possibly step hard enough around a seam in the plywood and see the seams separate a bit. Plus, tongue and groove will help force a more level ...


0

No that isn't needed. You'll likely have 2 more layers over the top of the sub-floor, backer and tile. Done right that seals things up nice and tight. If you are talking about your local building codes your best bet would be to call a builder/plumber and ask.


1

If you find the lines of nails/screws hard to spot, try a magnet. They should be pretty easy to figure out, as they will spaced much more closely along the joists, and should make lines that show you where the joists are. Don't set your saw too deep - it's problematic to cut where you can't see. One method is to use a small hole saw and drill around the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included