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Most stair treads are a true 1" thick also known as 5/4" milled. Anything less than that might sag when you walk on them depending on how it's framed. You can use 3/4" thick boards for the risers. Flooring can be all sizes for thickness depending on the application and manufacturer because you have a subfloor to attach it to. Thinner floors make ...


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The other answers hit the nail on the head--wood floors in basements or anywhere subject to moisture is generally a bad idea. I just wanted to add one more vinyl floor variant that you should consider for a basement installation if you are already considering a click-lock floor. I highly recommend loose lay vinyl tile. It is similar to click-lock vinyl ...


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Honestly if you have a contractor talking about basement flooring in a basement were there is a fear of moisture I would fire him on the spot if he mentioned installing real wood floors. Even in a basement with no "water" problems the humidity levels can reek havoc on wood and warp it. I see a bad wood install in a basement a couple times a year. I can't ...


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Wood doesn't breathe at any rate I'd consider adequate. If there's moisture present, it's probably going to have problems itself. I'd put down heavy polyethylene sheeting under your foam. It's probably a good idea regardless of your flooring choice.


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Well, it's been over a year with no expansion issues or buckling at all, so it looks like I got away with no expansion gap in front of the door. Note that this may not be the case for all installations, but it was for mine. Some other factors that I imagine played a role: The annual humidity extremes in my city are 90%/66% morning/afternoon during August, ...


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Just dealing with the matting question, I would assume regular matting would be ok, you will just need a lot of it. Assuming you will have one, I would keep the outside ramp clean, then have a commercial-quality welcome mat outside the door, and another two inside. (Like, the 3'x5' or so ones. Your goal is that the wheels have to make at least 1 complete ...


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If the wood is stable (some particle board swells and falls apart) once dry wipe down with hydrogen peroxide to kill any mold spores. Hydrogen peroxide on the floor boards may slightly bleach the wood if left on very long but will take care of mold spores without the smell of bleach. Bleach can also be used but will need to be diluted and will smell bad for ...


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I've tried self leveling compound once, and it broke into pieces with each nail. The crumbs don't move much, at first, but with movement of the new flooring (slight, over time) I"m doubtful that it'd work well over the long term. I took it up (small area/dip). I've since used 15 or even 30 lbs felt, which was used long ago under hardwood floors to minimize ...


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Agree that the term self levelling is a bit of an oxymoron. Sure it self levels within itself, but it doesn't know the level of the surrounding areas! Confirm also that level is irrelevant, flatness is all. Also agree that if the long joints are crossing this dip at 90 degrees it's less important (I'd still pack this one though). Dips up to 1/4 inch (across ...


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The building code does address the width, profile, and the rounding of the treads. From the 2009 IBC: R311.5.3.3 Profile. The radius of curvature at the leading edge of the tread shall be no greater than 9/16 inch (14 mm). I believe the reason for rounding the leading edge of the tread with wood is to reduce the likelihood of splintering. Also, ...


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This is the exact sort of thing that you should use self leveling compound for. A quick prime and then a self-leveler the next day (literally 15-20 mins of total work). Your leveling doesn't have to be perfect but I would fix the dip. This is very very easy. Self-leveling compound cannot seep through the plywood unless you put way way too much on. If ...


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That looks like an almost non-issue (especially if the flooring will run the same direction as that level, if not you'll need to do something about it). If it's a low traffic area it might not concern me in the slightest. I HATE, quote, "self leveling" compound. It should called: aww crap, now what? (you had better know how to trowel concrete) And if ...


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It's impossible to say for sure from your picture since it is already stained. But generally speaking the approach to this is trial and error with scrap pieces. You'll want to make sure the piece of totally dry before comparing the colour and it can look quite a bit different when wet. It's unlikely you will get an exact match even using the exact same ...


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You sure can. In fact, it's often best practice to start in a hallway, which is one of the places where a crooked installation really shows against the walls By starting there you minimize the chance of visual oddity. Typically, wood flooring is installed parallel to the longer side of the room. In the case of a hallway, you'd run it lengthwise.



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