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By running boards perpendicular in halls, the boards are cut to stagger joints which make them have a tendency to buckle and separate due to ther short length. This is especially at problem in doorways.


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Sure, just pull up the carpet. At that point, it depends on the condition of the wood floor. If it was in very poor condition and carpeting was installed to cover it up, you may have a big job of refinishing or replacing it. Otherwise, if the wood floor is in good condition, it's mostly a matter of using some color-matched wood putty to patch the holes made ...


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Flat sawn (note the cathedral pattern), but more than that? Meh. Likely maple, but there are a bunch of central / south american woods that are cheap and similar in appearance. Definitely not bamboo, which is a monocot, and has a distinctive appearance.


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That is maple. Plain old, flat sawn rock maple. There's no way to tell from the pictures if its engineered or solid but if you knock on it the sound will tell you. Solid sounds very dull, like knocking on a sidewalk. Engineered hardwood, even if its installed very well, sounds a bit hollow. You might not notice it when you walk across the room but if you tap ...


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Looking at different images may help you determine the species. Keep in mind I'm not a wood expert, and wood being a natural material will vary widely. Oak Oak tends to have a bold tight grain Ash Ash tends to have a bold semi-tight grain. Hickory Hickory tends to have a more subtle longer grain. Maple Maple tends to have a subtle semi-tight ...


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The floating floor needs the thin foam pad for it to function properly and most of the floating floor pads already have a vapor barrier as part of it. But adding an additional barrier is not needed (unless you have moisture issues). If you where doing a nail down install (instead of float) I would recommend rosin or tar paper between the the floors. But ...


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Before doing anything else, give part of the new board a swipe with paint thinner. Dampening it gives you an idea of what it will look like under a clear varnish, and paint thinner evaporates quickly enough that it doesn't tend to raise grain or otherwise interfere with the rest of the finishing process. That'll give you some idea of how much the color ...


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There is no way I would use a cork underlayment to make the floors equal. Cork has too many expanding properties. I don't even think you could get the cork to "sit" under a thin laminate. Also cork will feel softer than most other forms of underlayment. To the point where your floors will feel different. I would use plywood or what is under higher floor ...


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I would take out a baseboard and see if you can pull a board up a little or use a small mirror to see the side of a board. They should be spaced away from the wall enough to see. Engineered hardwood usually has 1/8" or less of said wood with backing. You cannot in almost all cases sand engineered hardwood. I have never ran across engineered that can be ...


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Both may be correct: "Engineered" floors often have a fairly thin, yet substantial, amount of hardwood laminated over a base of cheaper wood. This section can be as much as 3/8" thick, and can be sanded (carefully!) several times before hitting the laminated section. Apart from the methods suggested previously, you can wait for winter, when solid ...


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You need to find an area where you can inspect the side of the boards. If there are floor registers, remove one and inspect. If you don't have those, look for areas around doors other areas where you might be able to easily remove a trim to inspect. Worst case, you will need to remove a floor molding to inspect. Also height will give you a clue. 1/2 to ...


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There are lots of grades of laminate flooring. When I say lots maybe hundreds. These are the main things that figure in on how moisture will affect your laminate (almost all apply to engineered wood): Locking system. I have put together some laminate that have a very "loose" locking system. To the point where there are tiny gaps. Not an install ...


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Laminate flooring is intended to be cheap, readily disposable, and resilient against scuffs and scrapes. Against moisture, it is much more vulnerable due to the MDF core. The top layer is already sealed, but moisture will eventually work its way between the planks, and I don't believe there's any practical way to seal these gaps. It's simply not intended for ...


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I would say that it absolutely should be sealed well all the way around the bathroom, and so that water cannot get underneath fixtures. However, even on a floor that had no sealing at all I would not expect this kind of damage simply from mopping and minor spills. Do (did) you actually observe water being wicked out from the edge? Could it be that the ...


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Vinyl sheet flooring should be glued down in high traffic areas that will have rolling wheels such as wheelchair, office chairs or any heavy items on rollers as the vinyl can easily be stretched and easily torn if something catches on it. Speaking from experience:) Worst culprit in kitchen is when you have to move a refrigerator, range, dishwasher and feet ...


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A carbide paint scraper was my tool of choice for the black carpet adhesive residue that stuck to my floors. With a steel scraper it was nearly pointless; the carbide stayed sharp enough, long enough, to work on my particular variant of black glop, so I did not have to pull up and replace the floor to get a clean surface. I did not use any chemicals, as I ...


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It's not fun or easy, but it can be done. Good answer was provided here How can I replace a board in floating wood floor?: From the previous answer: You'd have to treat it like a hardwood floor t&g repair: Run a circular saw down one side, staying away from seam at least the thickness of the tongue, with depth set to board thickness. Repeat #1 ...


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If the tongue and grove were properly glued I doubt banging on them will separate the boards without causing more harm. The glued joint is going to be pretty strong and it will tear the wood, not just at the board but the entire seam you are banging against. It will be better to use the more common method of just cutting the damaged board out and ...


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You might want to consider a different laminate or switch to engineered wood. Found this install instruction for laminate and it does mention adding an expansion joint for larger rooms. Max room size before expansion is 33' for the panel length and 26' for the panel width. Switching the panels to run on the short side of the room is not going to help ...


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Assuming the existing subfloor does not have excessive deflection in it, I would put down a 1/4" tile backerboard instead of plywood, and then put Ditra on top of that, and then tile. If you are using a 1/4" floor tile, that will give you pretty much a 3/4" final thickness which generally works well with other flooring. If the subfloor isn't that solid, ...


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Depending on what type of laminate you bought, it may be difficult to transition from room to room without using moulding because I would think that you may start having to go backwards with the laminate??


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You should be fine in terms of compressional strength, the more important issue is the point stress load. If the heater has feet of some kind they might punch right through your plywood if they're not over a joist. If you want to be safe you could cut out a square in the floor the size of the heaters footprint, then install blocking around the holes opening ...


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I consider myself more than handy and I would still hire carpet guys for a new instillation (if for some reason I wanted installed carpet). You ever use one of those knee things? pfft. You are however, looking at a carpet repair. So long as you don't over cut the carpet, you can give it a go. Call guys in if you have unsatisfactory results. Consider dong ...


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No that quote is too high, especially the 300 side of the quote. You are paying a company, not the installer who gets less than half of that. You should seek out an installer and be able to get that done for ~100, which is reasonable. Doing the job yourself will be a little more difficult than you might want to get involved in. First you need to get the ...


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Laminate flooring is intended to survive reasonable moisture that might be spilled. Moisture should be mopped up as soon as possible on any floor. If there were significant flooding, the laminate (and almost any real wood floor) would be at risk of damage beyond repair. Almost no floor is truly waterproof.



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