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First you generally won't tile over plywood. It will contract and expand too much and your tile will eventually crack. You will need to put backerboard (size dependent on what is beneath it) over the plywood. Generally you don't need to repair the plywood unless it is no longer flat.


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Not an expert but I am in the middle of the same process so I'll share some of the knowledge I've acquired from my research on the subject. The answer is that it completely depends upon what is underneath the linoleum. If its particle board, your question is irrelevant because you can't lay tile on particle board (particle board expands/contracts and ...


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I would suggest that since you intend (and should) attach the frame to the subfloor that it will be much better to install the frame first. Then fit the flooring up to the frame.


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Attempting to put caulking to the wall under the base board with the carpet installed is very likely going to result in caulking spread out onto the carpet - also if you ever have to pull it temporarily - the parts embedded into the caulk will separate from the rest of the carpet. Unfortunately, placing the caulking under the baseboard with the carpet ...


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If the subfloor is plywood no other ply is necessary; but you do need a flat surface for the Ditra. If the subfloor cannot either be scraped, chiseled, or sanded flat then self leveling compound may be required. If you use self leveling compound remember that the surface should be primed first - follow the product's prep recommendations. 1/8" plywood, in ...


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The only time I have ever heard of an inspector even talking about a bathroom floor is if there is another dwelling below you (basement apartment being rented out). There are no codes or laws for a normal one family dwelling. I am sure certain towns may have something for apartment buildings and such but the answer is no. Should you use one? Seriously ...


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Not an expert but I have installed laminate in 3 rooms in my house. I would go with the light (assuming you mean windows being the light source) rule for the following reasons: Assuming your drawing is to scale, if you eliminate the alcove in front of the closet, the room is almost square making the longest wall rule almost irrelevant. The reflection off ...


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In almost all cases this is a no. There are waterproofing systems you can use but not flooring pad. When you lay your tile the pad will move a little and cause issues. In essence with a pad you are creating a giant floating tile floor. Note: To reduce sound from the floor you want to do two things. Build up the subfloor. Adding an inch of plywood ...


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Subject to both the tile and underlayment manufacturer's installation requirements, yes. It is common for such manufacturer's to have technical support departments and contacting them will often provide a wealth of expert advice.


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Typical requirement for US building codes is l/360 live load deflection limit. So it is not quite accurate to classify this as a correction if the design deflection is l/337. If the finish material requires a stiffer floor, then a structural change is required for aesthetics and or performance, but not for structural safety. Structural modifications will ...


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I'm putting down reclaimed pine in my house (1926 bungalow) and will include the wood floor in the kid's 10'x14' bath. I too, am going for a vintage/distressed look and I like the look of a white clawfoot tub and pedestal sink against the warmer wood tones. Overflowing toilet seems to be the only potential drawback, but what the heck...



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