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I am a certified technician with DSapone.com and we waterproof tile, stone, grout and just about every other surface with a product called Celine. It's a true waterproofing sealer that is crystal clear and is a solvent base. You can found this product and more at www.pFOkUS.com.


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Use a pancake air compressor and a air chisel with a wide chisel blade. Use ear protection, knee pads and goggles! No gum mess or chemicals to clean up. Lowes sales the air chisel for $30.00. I already had the wide chisel blade. You can rent, beg, borrow or steal the pan cake compressor ( stealing should be your last option) 😀.


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I'm surprised no one has mentioned this but based on the statement: I had a french drain installed it seems to me like if you paid someone (assumption here) to install a drain and they left it in a state where it is going to cause a puddle to form before water is able to drain into it, that it should be the company's responsibility at this point. At ...


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If it's a small area around the drain, the lowest cost, least-fuss option is one of these grinding blocks (use with some water and you can mop the slurry up rather than deal with dust in the air. Plug the floor drain first.) The one with the grooves is most applicable.


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A big 7" angle grinder with a diamond cup bit would work nicely. You can also get away with the 'masonry grinding' bit sold at big box stores. You should try to get a dust shroud as well, as even a small amount of concrete grinding will send fine dust everywhere.


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From the description, I suggest renting a proper concrete grinder (bottom of the page) from your local rental shop or big box. This will allow finer control and result in a flatter, smoother surface than if you attempted to use abrasive or diamond-bitted handheld power tools. If you'd rather not go that far, an angle grinder with an appropriate disk would ...


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You already answered why; the poly that was put down is peeling off! My parents tried to use poly on a new pine floor when I was a child. It peeled and chipped and wore off in areas after about 2 years. I suspect (now) that the difference in rigidity was the primary reason for the separation of varnish (hard) and pine (soft). Surface finishes like varnish ...


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I always go with carpet in basement =bad. But if you are confident there will be no moisture issues, OK. Honestly the laminate is not that bad, meaning once you start at one end, it all just kind of folds up. It is interlocking and not glued or nailed so you could probably handle that yourself. It would also give you a chance to see and moisture proof the ...


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Give the history you know of with the home, it's probably not a concern. I'd ask the carpet manufacturer how it affects your warranty, though. As easy as laminate is to remove, it might be worth doing. One drawback to the adhesive tiles--if your basement floods you can't lift the carpet to dry things and salvage it. I've been involved with several basement ...


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I have been researching this same question because I have about 1000 sqft of hardwood floors that have been covered by linoleum tile, carpet adhesive, paint overspray, and vinyl flooring glue. I found a few solutions on the internet and am going to try them this week. The most promising options I've seen are: Hand scrape with a solvent that will not stain ...


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In some areas, you can get away without having grout, but the tiles will be more susceptible to damage because grout (or something) adds strength to the floor (and keeps the tiles in place). You may have seen or heard about how some people make really tight fittings with beveled tile, and they don't use grout. This is more for areas that are onramental or ...


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In all cases like this, I have this covered with a durable paintable material. In your case I would use a 1X PVC material to cover from the floor to the top of the 2X plate and another piece of PVC or 1X wood to cover the top of the plate and PVC edge and paint it all.


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What you are calling a floor joist, appears to be much thicker than a 2x floor joist. Maybe like a 4x8 or something. So it's probably a "bearer" resting on the piers, which would explain why they are far apart. Typically you would then rest floor joists across those beams, (or use Simpson hangers if the floor needs to be nearly flush to the beams -- ...


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I know this is an old question, but here's what I did: (1) drill holes in the concrete. Yes, this is a PITA, but with the right bit it is not too bad. The holes do not need to be huge, nor do they need to be deep if you use the right screws. (2) Use the right screws. The ones I used are from a standard Big Box store, and are specifically designed for ...


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Level it... with more tile? I've done my share of concrete work, but there's no way I'd trust myself to float a finished floor and I wouldn't personally guarantee any work I did less than four inches thick. I'd tile it just like the rest, if I were set (haha) on doing concrete, I'd hire that out to a stone flooring specialist. I doubt you own a commercial ...


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3/4" gap all around has been the norm that I have seen on old house installs. If the drywall is high enough to make that gap to the framing all the better. That way the gap could be bigger and the base will still cover if you choose to not have shoe mold as many new installs nowadays go that way. The biggest issue for solid wood floors over a large area is ...


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I would acid etch the old cement with a strong muriatic acid solution to clean and make the surface rough. Then add a adhesive promoter like Moos milk painted on the slab that will help the cement bond and reduce cracking. I have done this on floors as thin as 3/4" and as thick as 2" with good results. With a thin slab a fine aggregate like 1/4" will also ...



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