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The most honest answer is, "it doesn't matter." Assuming the worst case scenario that there is no insulation of any sort beneath the pipes, a flooring material with a lower thermal conductivity will cause a small amount of the heat to be directed downwards rather than upwards, but we're probably talking about a difference in the number of watts/BTUs that can ...


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Aside from the factors mentioned by "Some Guy", note that the relatively still air next to surfaces also has an insulating value. A rough estimate for many common cases would be about 0.1 m^2K/W. For thin assemblies, this air film dominates the total heat transfer and means the insulating value of the materials themselves have very little impact on the ...


2

Respectfully, you are trying to compare apples to autos here. Burning gas makes things hot. Thermal conductivity is just how fast it takes the heat to get to you. I suggest you go try to calculate it from theory, physics is fun, calculus is interesting, the numbers will not lie to you, and you will see the logical error immediately. The heat has to go ...


1

Do you have forced air heating? If so, the smell is likely coming through the duct work. I can almost assure you that in such a system, the vents/duct work are not well sealed. So this would allow their system to push smoke into small holes between the floors, and your system to pull the smoke into you place. Get a HEPA like filter for the furnace. Put ...


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I voted up Jack's answer since he is right on with everything. Just want to add that you are not doing your whole house so you need to figure out if taking out 1/2" MDF is going to affect the height matching of the adjacent flooring. You may very well have to put back a 1/2" sheet of plywood after ripping out the bad stuff.


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I have seen 3/4" thick hardwood floors go over 1/2" subfloor with no problem. Your floor structure is plenty heavy to carry any load you apply to it. In many older homes (really old homes) there was no subfloor at all, and the floors held up very well. Remove the layer of MDF, clean up the nails, and reset all the nails that are in the subfloor. This ...


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The best idea would to start by ripping up the MDF assuming the plywood underneath is good and not rotten or destroyed, then check the floor to see if it is level again, if it is you can put down new 3/4 plywood and screw it in, there is no need for glue here. I would recommend screwing it into the joists though, not just the plywood! Then lay down your ...


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I had a similar situation when I redid my basement - couldn't put baseboard in to hide the gap between the doorway and the laminate flooring at the entry door. The most common solution I've seen in images I found on the web and in my chosen home improvement store was to use color coordinated T-moulding along the doorway right up against the bottom sill. I'd ...


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Easy way, Best results: Remove carpet, pad and nailing strips. Vacuum. Measure thickness of new flooring with underlayment, and add 1/16 inch. Take your biscuit joiner, and remove the adjustable front shoe. Extend the blade and tie it back using a tie wrap. Measure the distance from the base plate to the TOP edge of the cutter. Subtract this from the ...


3

Low-E windows will go a great job, and help with many energy losses. A rug will always be better than just about anything, covered places on just about anything will take less abuse than uncovered surfaces. Minwax has always been my favorite for anything I can put it on. Their naming conventions are not always the most clever. 'Minwax Super Fast-Drying ...


0

I was mixing thinset on my porch last year and some dropped on the cement. My son started wiping it up and I said "don't bother" and he was a bit surprised. Went to the porch a week later with a putty knife and popped the thinset off with a few taps of a hammer on the putty knife. Moral of the story being thinset kind of binds to concrete but not really. ...


1

If you can locate your floor joists, you can use a longer, ~2-2.5" finish nail and nail both finish floor and subfloor to the joist. Once the subfloor is tightened down, you can spot nail the finish floor to the subfloor as needed. I did that in my 1928 house and it worked.


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The leveling compound pictured is used underneath a finish floor. The minwax/ bondo solution would provide a durable fix that you could walk on. So I guess it depends on whether you'll throw something over the top of the fix...


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Pro: cheap, and nothing prevents you from putting a real surface on if you find the look does not really appeal after a while. Cons: Potential for nasty splinters; plywood splinters are miserable. Relatively loud (both to walk on, and acting as a reflector of sound - also loud to the level below if there is living space there).


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I'm wondering easthetically, if you run the planks the long way along the length of the room, it might enhance the long and narrow feel of the room. Whereas, if you run the planks the other way, it may give the room the appearance of balance between width and length. I personally would not run them along the long length but the other way.


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As long as the asbestos material is contained between your subfloors you are fine. It doesn't matter if it crumples up being sandwiched in there. You may have to take extra precautions taking it out in this case but it isn't a concern in current state.


3

Remove the entire shower door and frame and scrub door opening tile and door/frame assembly completely clean and let dry. Re-install shower door properly and completely seal all areas where frame and tile meet with high-grade silicone caulk. Most swinging shower doors are supposed to have a vinyl flap at the bottom to prevent water spray from escaping under ...


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If you want to match that thickness exactly, you'll have to get something custom milled, or planed down from 1" stock. The difference between .83" and 0.75" is just over a 16th of an inch. Probably an extra layer of tar paper would make up the difference.


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I have placed Dricore or its equivalent on 2 different jobs. Both are holding up fine, neither felt hollow or creaky. One was in a basement slab, the other was placed on a slab on grade such as yours. The only difference is one had 4" to 10" wide plank flooring from recovered barn wood, the other 2 1/4" strip. While the subfloor was being laid, I glued the ...


0

This is really about your expectations of the flooring. If you are more worried about looks then you need to go with a solid hardwood. Bamboo is a very hard wood and will last many pets - when we are talking about surface damage. However scratching will eventually breach the stain/poly finish - and then when they pee/poop that will get in the wood and ...


0

Do not install a laminate floor with pets. Barf, urine etc. will swell the edges of most laminates. Even using mops that are too wet will swell the edges of the flooring. Your best bet will be with bamboo or the like. Talk about this with your installer, or if you are buying directly, check with the supplier what their warranty covers. You may find ...


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Flat is an option. I'm not altogether clear on what scheme you think you were following, or what you think it was doing for you, but it sounds suspiciously like something someone dreamed up and presented as fact, with a dubious or non-existant basis in reality. A slope does not "create tension." A load does that. Buildings on post foundations are made ...



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