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Oscillating tool, like a Fein Multimaster and all of its off-patent brothers. (Truly, I don't know how I got by so long without one.) But, could you not just slap a 2x4 on the side of the floor joist and make a sturdy ledge for your existing hatch?


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You have two options: Raise the lower floor by covering it in cementboard or plywood (depending on what you plan to cover it in, if you're planning to re-do it), or keep the floors at differing heights and use a transition piece like the one keshlam posted to hide it.


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My carpenter's solution was simply to bridge the gap with a threshold, with its underside cut differentially to compensate for the difference. Having a clearly raised area between the two, with slopes on either side, is less likely to be a trip hazard than a smaller but sharper transition.


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Two issues: First, you need to make sure that your floor is rigid enough and planar enough for the tile to be successful. There are deflection tests to determine rigidity, and different ways of checking for planar. The bigger the tiles are, the more important these are. 1/2" plywood is unlikely to be sufficient. 3/4" plywood glued and screwed with backer ...


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You should just lay some backer board on top of your current subfloor and go from there.


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It may be too late to answer but whoever comes across this from now on can have an answer. To create this look over a concrete slab, it first needs to be diamond grinded, all cracks and divots need to be properly patched, then a good penetrating epoxy primer or waterproof membrane if vapor problems are present needs to be used. Next, to get that glass smooth ...


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To deal with just the blacktop you basically need to jackhammer up some holes in the floor so that you can pour footings. You can frame out the area much like you would a deck. This is given that the walls of the garage are above proper footings. How many footings you need is dependent on how big your garage is. How deep the footings are, is dependent of ...


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Sometimes new construction is easier in that you know exactly what the house is built of. If you're in an older house there may be more and more surprises which make the project harder and harder. The time estimate would vary depending on this contractor's crew size. It sounds like he has a very small crew (maybe of 1 or 2) and that is reflected in his ...


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Re-did some floors a couple of years ago with the same situation, two layers of carpets on hardwood floor with the bottom layer glued down. We used heat gun and scrapers to remove most of it, and then some glue remover on the worst parts. After doing this the person that came in and re-did our floors said that was not needed, especially the glue remover. He ...


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Pros: I can't think of any. Cons: You will have gaps and screws showing, it will be extremely hard to clean, plywood will suck up poly faster than a fat guy drinking a milkshake, ditto the whitewash... Real not to do it are simple. You would have to sand down everything to prevent splinters. Good chance an inspector doesn't even pass it. No way I ...


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I think the easiest way to tell, look for a quarter round trim between the cabinet and the floor. If it has a quarter round, then two options: floor does not go under the cabinet, or the owner likes the look of the quarter round. If it doesn't have a quarter round, floor goes under the cabinets, and if it doesn't it is pretty easy to see it doesn't (hence ...


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3 choices Measure toe kick height. These are usually right at 4 or 4.5 inches. I might assume that if toe kick was 3 3/4" then there was probably no hardwoods under. This is not the best way though because toe kicks can be non-standard. Remove a piece of trim and see if you see the bottom of the cabinets. This might just be pulling back some quarter ...


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If it is an older house with existing hardwood floors, there is a terrific chance of the floor going under the cabs, If there is laminate flooring, The chances are nil it goes under. On older homes, with hardwood floors if the cabinets are removed, they may need to be refinished anyway since the floors usually are never sanded and stained under the ...


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In my experience, which is admittedly limited, you never want to glue hardwood to cement. Most hardwood manufacturers will tell you that you shouldn't put hardwood over a cement subfloor to begin with, but if you do you want to float it on a plywood subfloor or on plywood float strips. The problem is that the wood expands and contracts at a different rate ...


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Well, it turns out, the answer is I'm an idiot. I misread the guidelines and used the wrong gauge of staples. As the result, I got this textbook description from the manufacturer: IMPORTANT: Be sure not to over-drive the fastener past the nail slot, this can lead to a condition known as a telegraphing fastener. A telegraphing fastener is the visible effect ...


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I've never seen an oak floor with high-heel divots like I've seen in almost every other type of wood flooring. Bamboo is the only wood on this list that has the caveat: (represents one species) -do your homework on the species and the supplier. IMO, anything other than oak is only for esthetics (unless you can afford ironwood).


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You can walk on HB as long as you like. If it is of the 1/2" variety I seriously doubt you could damage it. However it does emit silica dust. If you walked on it vigorously you could kick some up and it is really not a good thing to breathe or be near food. You can certainly paint it. There are waterproofing paints used for backer boards like redgard... ...


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The most honest answer is, "it doesn't matter." Assuming the worst case scenario that there is no insulation of any sort beneath the pipes, a flooring material with a lower thermal conductivity will cause a small amount of the heat to be directed downwards rather than upwards, but we're probably talking about a difference in the number of watts/BTUs that can ...


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Aside from the factors mentioned by "Some Guy", note that the relatively still air next to surfaces also has an insulating value. A rough estimate for many common cases would be about 0.1 m^2K/W. For thin assemblies, this air film dominates the total heat transfer and means the insulating value of the materials themselves have very little impact on the ...


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Respectfully, you are trying to compare apples to autos here. Burning gas makes things hot. Thermal conductivity is just how fast it takes the heat to get to you. I suggest you go try to calculate it from theory, physics is fun, calculus is interesting, the numbers will not lie to you, and you will see the logical error immediately. The heat has to go ...


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Do you have forced air heating? If so, the smell is likely coming through the duct work. I can almost assure you that in such a system, the vents/duct work are not well sealed. So this would allow their system to push smoke into small holes between the floors, and your system to pull the smoke into you place. Get a HEPA like filter for the furnace. Put ...



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