Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I think I would jack the wall up a tiny bit (1/16 inch), enough to slide out the particle board and slide in plywood. Given the difficulties of jacks being in the way of the work, cut the plywood so it is only 12-16 inches wide (and 8 feet long or whatever) so the jacking support can be away from the wall.


1

The tile you liked says "waterproof: no" in the specifications. I suggest plank-style vinyl flooring that clicks together without adhesive.


1

They are waterproof in that you can get the top as wet as you want. They are not waterproof in that they will keep water off your floor, nor will said water not affect the bond to the floor. These tiles may be able to last sitting in water but they will not keep water from getting underneath. Your only options are really one sheet of vinyl or tile (could ...


0

You'll end up getting different answers from different people. Some folks actually will tell you to notch the bottom of the joist to let it sag back down before sistering the joist. But IMHO, it would be best to know the cause and effect before making any permanent structural changes like this. I had a similar problem (high joists in poorly constructed ...


0

First thing is to try and remedy the situation. Adding finish to one side has caused an imbalance in the woods ability to absorb and release ambient moisture, causing it to twist. If at all possible pull up the offending members and oil the underside as well to help mitigate this affect. Once that's done reset your base moulding by shooting finish nails ...


0

Cleanup Clean tools and uncured adhesive residue immediately with mineral spirits in a well-ventilated area to the outdoors. Remove cured adhesive by carefully scraping with a sharp-edged tool. From http://www.loctiteproducts.com/p/pl_ca_prem/directions/Loctite-PL-Premium-Polyurethane-Construction-Adhesive.htm


0

Although cement backer board is an ideal substrate for tile, you could bond directly to the existing plywood if it is clean, flat and strong (little or no flex); this is acceptable for areas that see only incidental moisture. There are polymer fortified thin-set mortars specifically designed for direct application to sound plywood flooring that does not ...


15

Tile first, then carpet. Tiling is a messy process. Much easier not to have the carpet there to get messy and/or need to be kept clean while you are tiling.


2

That depends on how you plan to re-install it. If you plan on face nailing it's fine to just lay it down as though it were a ship lapped. This might sound a bit half arsed to some but I've seen reclaimed flooring face nailed down with cut nails (into the joists) and it looked very nice. You can run a bead of construction adhesive down the seams for a little ...


0

-Is fan fold insulation an acceptable underlayment for hardwood? As a complete underlayment for snap-lock flooring, yes but I'd be more comfortable using rolls similar to what the manufacturers specify. Hardwood flooring installed traditionally with nails is to be installed directly on the subfloor. (Rosin paper is optional) -But it is being used as a ...


4

It's the type of rubber you use for the blade. Neoprene or Viton will not dissolve in oil. We used a heavier form of Neoprene squeegee for cleanup after mopping the garage floor to remove oil and grease in our automotive shop. Squeegee'd floors dry a lot quicker. It's necessary to use an oil resistant synthetic rubber compound for the squeegee blade in ...


0

Making tongues is fine but depending on where you live you can buy tongues as well. Most wood floor companies stock them or can order some. They may need to be sanded to size then just glue them into the groove. Good luck.


0

I would leave the wood as the gentleman before me commented. Just sand them (if needed) re-stain and wax sealer. Put some rugs down... small rugs with pads. Enjoy the beauty of the old wood!


1

If the wood is in good condition and you refinish it properly I see no reason not to keep that flooring. Most oil based flooring vanishes will work fine but if you want to get really serious have a professional flooring company come in and finish it with an aluminum oxide based finished or one of the catalyzed varnishes.


0

Best practice I've seen is to "de-fuzz" the wool applicators with duct tape or something similar before using them. Nothing will completely eliminate a few lost fibers, but this keeps them to a minimum.


0

If you really want to remove the adhesive, lightly mist with water, let it sit for a few minutes, then scrape it up.


3

The risk is that the boards will become unflush during seasonal expansion and contraction. Even if they look fine going in; tripping hazards will appear at these seams once everything settles (and then unsettles... and back again). I use a table saw with three blades sandwiched together to cut grooves back into my useless cut-offs. Tongues aren't fun to ...


2

As long as it is flat this should be a non-issue. Floating or nailing down a little left-over adhesive is "normal" and not a big deal.


1

I would suggest doing the thresholds first. These are very prominent and you want the things that stand out looking the best. In a doorway if you do threshold first then it is a rectangle fitting doorway. If you do the threshold last, than who knows - this would be up to how square your room is and how well you aligned your tiles. Added: Also when ...


1

In terms of the general process it's acceptable to do it threshold(sill plate) first but there may be specifics to the situation that we're not aware of. Contractors are primarily concerned with pushing the project along to keep pace, but occasionally to do that you have to do things out of sequence. An example would be, if the threshold is available but the ...


2

Just the top layer of vinyl. You could remove more if you need to match floor height on adjacent rooms.



Top 50 recent answers are included