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4

That looks like an almost non-issue (especially if the flooring will run the same direction as that level, if not you'll need to do something about it). If it's a low traffic area it might not concern me in the slightest. I HATE, quote, "self leveling" compound. It should called: aww crap, now what? (you had better know how to trowel concrete) And if ...


3

This is the exact sort of thing that you should use self leveling compound for. A quick prime and then a self-leveler the next day (literally 15-20 mins of total work). Your leveling doesn't have to be perfect but I would fix the dip. This is very very easy. Self-leveling compound cannot seep through the plywood unless you put way way too much on. If ...


3

The building code does address the width, profile, and the rounding of the treads. From the 2009 IBC: R311.5.3.3 Profile. The radius of curvature at the leading edge of the tread shall be no greater than 9/16 inch (14 mm). I believe the reason for rounding the leading edge of the tread with wood is to reduce the likelihood of splintering. Also, ...


2

I've tried self leveling compound once, and it broke into pieces with each nail. The crumbs don't move much, at first, but with movement of the new flooring (slight, over time) I"m doubtful that it'd work well over the long term. I took it up (small area/dip). I've since used 15 or even 30 lbs felt, which was used long ago under hardwood floors to minimize ...


2

Agree that the term self levelling is a bit of an oxymoron. Sure it self levels within itself, but it doesn't know the level of the surrounding areas! Confirm also that level is irrelevant, flatness is all. Also agree that if the long joints are crossing this dip at 90 degrees it's less important (I'd still pack this one though). Dips up to 1/4 inch (across ...


1

You sure can. In fact, it's often best practice to start in a hallway, which is one of the places where a crooked installation really shows against the walls By starting there you minimize the chance of visual oddity. Typically, wood flooring is installed parallel to the longer side of the room. In the case of a hallway, you'd run it lengthwise.


1

Taken from my books, dated 2002 and 1948. Nothing has changed. Thicker side up. Part sentence below the second image relates to cutting the tongue "slightly nearer the bottom surface than the top": Incidentally the gap on the underside mentioned on the first image is the clincher. It's not always there but if it is then it confirms that that edge is to ...



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