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3/4" gap all around has been the norm that I have seen on old house installs. If the drywall is high enough to make that gap to the framing all the better. That way the gap could be bigger and the base will still cover if you choose to not have shoe mold as many new installs nowadays go that way. The biggest issue for solid wood floors over a large area is ...


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Give the history you know of with the home, it's probably not a concern. I'd ask the carpet manufacturer how it affects your warranty, though. As easy as laminate is to remove, it might be worth doing. One drawback to the adhesive tiles--if your basement floods you can't lift the carpet to dry things and salvage it. I've been involved with several basement ...


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I'm surprised no one has mentioned this but based on the statement: I had a french drain installed it seems to me like if you paid someone (assumption here) to install a drain and they left it in a state where it is going to cause a puddle to form before water is able to drain into it, that it should be the company's responsibility at this point. At ...


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From the description, I suggest renting a proper concrete grinder (bottom of the page) from your local rental shop or big box. This will allow finer control and result in a flatter, smoother surface than if you attempted to use abrasive or diamond-bitted handheld power tools. If you'd rather not go that far, an angle grinder with an appropriate disk would ...


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In all cases like this, I have this covered with a durable paintable material. In your case I would use a 1X PVC material to cover from the floor to the top of the 2X plate and another piece of PVC or 1X wood to cover the top of the plate and PVC edge and paint it all.


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I know this is an old question, but here's what I did: (1) drill holes in the concrete. Yes, this is a PITA, but with the right bit it is not too bad. The holes do not need to be huge, nor do they need to be deep if you use the right screws. (2) Use the right screws. The ones I used are from a standard Big Box store, and are specifically designed for ...


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I would acid etch the old cement with a strong muriatic acid solution to clean and make the surface rough. Then add a adhesive promoter like Moos milk painted on the slab that will help the cement bond and reduce cracking. I have done this on floors as thin as 3/4" and as thick as 2" with good results. With a thin slab a fine aggregate like 1/4" will also ...



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