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0

the gaps between boards are too big. It was not meant to be the finished floor. looks like pine, fir or something similar.


1

That appears to be a subfloor (softwood, plain edges, face-nailed.) It's a good place to put a finish floor (hardwood, parquet, etc) and not a very good finish floor itself, no matter what you coat it with. Softwood finish-floors are not unheard of, but that isn't one, IMHO.


2

Much of the difficulty in stopping floor squeaks comes from the fact that people don't want to remove or damage their flooring to fix it. There are special screws with heads that snap off and other gadgets to make it easy. You have no flooring, so it makes it a lot easier. Get some good, strong screws and go to town on the areas that squeak. Screw the ...


0

Use a long small (1/8" or smaller) drill bit and go under the house, drill up through the floor as close as you can get to the floor beam. Go in the house and locate the drill bit, now you know where the floor beam is and the very small hole is negligible. I also use this method in my sheet rock ceiling to locate the ceiling walls in the attic.


2

The only way to be sure is to send a sample to a testing lab. Send a sample of the adhesive too, since asbestos was sometimes mixed into that. I'm assuming this is tiles; if so you can lift one buy using a heat gun to soften the adhesive and gently lifting with a putty knife. In most cases, encapsulating the suspect tile under a floating floor is acceptable ...


2

It's a process, not a "special" material. A good steel trowel job can give a glass-like finish on standard concrete. It's partly technique, and partly timing (or timing is part of the technique.) Troweling knocks down larger particles and brings up smaller ones, resulting in a smooth finish. In many places it's too smooth, IMHO - easy to sweep, but also easy ...


2

If you want to get a smooth finish after-the-fact, there are some great products out there that will set smooth and very thin - a real 'feather edge'. I recently used Henry FeatherFinish Patch and Skimcoat to prep a rough and uneven concrete floor before laying luxury vinyl tile and was really pleased with the results. Once mixed, it spreads like butter with ...


2

In the case of a very small bathroom I tend to lay the tile out on the doorway, where the pattern and position are most conspicuous. I usually center either a tile or a joint. In the case of 12" tiles this is even more impactful, as an off-center doorway catches the eye. Then, lay out tiles in both directions and see how they interact with walls, plumbing ...


1

You can start wherever you like - there are consequences, though. The reason for normally starting in the middle of the floor is that walls are often (always...) NOT straight or square, and thus a better job results from starting in the center and trimming ALL the walls, rather than starting along one or two walls. Thus, for a "4x6" room, you'd have 3 full ...


0

The reason to start in the center is to make the room look even. By measuring each end then putting a line down the center you will be able to follow that and any out of square errors are cut in half. The molding/ mop board will help hide the edges. If you want to start from 1 wall pick the wall that has the largest view from the door and go from there would ...


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I just purchased a house in the United States, Pennsylvania to be specific by a lake and I was considering pouring concrete over the floor which is identical to the floor pictured above. However I was told that this type of floor was designed this way for drainage should water enter the space...makes sense to me now. The wood floors that have since been ...


0

yes - just make sure you use fiberglass mesh on top of the backer and use a good quality polymer modified mortar to install the tiles.


1

Joined perfectly, 1x4 boards would work. However, you'll get more nailing (/screwing) surface, possibly lower cost, and only slightly greater weight from 2x4s. You mention center support beams... I'm not really clear on how you plan on putting those in, but you probably don't need them with 2x4s. I'd suggest at least 1/2" plywood on top.


0

NO- Peel and stick vinyl is a trap! Glue-goop seeps up from the seams after about a year, making black blobs on the floor (to clean, scrub with a putty knife, weekly at least), while at the same time dirt begins to find its way under the edges of the tiles and then the corners begin to fail, peel up, and crack. If you get any dirt on the goop underneath the ...


1

The best solution I can think of in your situation is to put down really cheap floating laminate flooring. This type of flooring is easy to install, and you don't have to worry about any glue. When you leave, you don't have to explain to the landlord what you did to the floor, you can just pick up the floor and leave it like it was when you moved in. You ...


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A tile mosaic laid at an angle so as to "ramp" up to the height of the floor wood look nice.


-1

clearing a concrete slab is an entirely different process than using it as a base for some other flooring the key is homogeneity. to achieve that, on a previously adhered to floor, is to coat it with a layer of new cementious material. just trowel on 1/4" or so of a good high polymer modified levelling compound (not a self levelling compound) or a tile ...


0

I had an entry way floor some 30 years ago that had old hard vinyl tile glued down in it with the blackish-brown type of adhesive. I wanted to replace that tile with a ceramic floor tile so I peeled out all of the old tile. I then used a wide razor scraper to get most of the old adhesive scraped off. After that I purchased a few gallons of aggressive ...


0

Do you know what base the adhesive is? I.E. latex, mineral spirits, lacquer? you could try paint stripper, lacquer thinner, (be careful with flames or sparks), or something like Goo Gone, or Goof Off.



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