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0

Sounds like you didn't use a concrete floor paint. There are only a few kind of paints that can stand up to the harsh conditions of a basement floor. Best thing you can do is try removing what is there and then applying the proper type of paint. What you have will just continue to peel.


0

First it sounds like you used a latex paint which for a basement floor is not a good solution. You need to use the messier, oil based paint. This will soak into the concrete a bit and are a lot more durable. This paint will continue to have problems when wet - especially with hot water or when scraped by something sharp or heavy. Also at the 3 week ...


0

My solution was to grind the high side down with a diamond wheel on an angle grinder until the surface was reasonably level, apply an epoxy filler, and cover the floor with an epoxy chip floor that will cover any further imperfections.


3

I would find it hard to believe that someone would sand a wood floor but then neglect to put a protective finish on it (unless this is a very rustic building like a barn?). It's possible there's varnish there but it's not a glossy type. An unfinished wood floor seems like a negligent decision by the landlord and a bad investment on their part. I would check ...


2

The simple approach (and the one I'd suggest above any of the following) is to have a sock-hop (take off your shoes and dance on the carpet) and the most workable approach to a one-time need for a hard floor is to rent a dance floor (they are a standard rental-store item, as seen at weddings done in huge tents, etc...) 8x8 is a rather tiny dance floor for "a ...


1

Flat sawn (note the cathedral pattern), but more than that? Meh. Likely maple, but there are a bunch of central / south american woods that are cheap and similar in appearance. Definitely not bamboo, which is a monocot, and has a distinctive appearance.


9

That is maple. Plain old, flat sawn rock maple. There's no way to tell from the pictures if its engineered or solid but if you knock on it the sound will tell you. Solid sounds very dull, like knocking on a sidewalk. Engineered hardwood, even if its installed very well, sounds a bit hollow. You might not notice it when you walk across the room but if you tap ...


8

Looking at different images may help you determine the species. Keep in mind I'm not a wood expert, and wood being a natural material will vary widely. Oak Oak tends to have a bold tight grain Ash Ash tends to have a bold semi-tight grain. Hickory Hickory tends to have a more subtle longer grain. Maple Maple tends to have a subtle semi-tight ...


0

Concrete has about the same expansion rate due to temperature as steel [this is why reinforced concrete does not break apart from thermal stress]. A stone walls are likely have another coefficient of thermal expansion (and perhaps some other constraints). It is sound practice to isolate slabs from existing structures absent a compelling reason to tie them ...


-1

I do not think you need an expansion joint around the edge. The concrete should shrink slightly as it cures, and create it's own expansion gap naturally. However, I am not familiar with your loacale and the environmental conditions and building codes. I would suggest speaking to a professional if you're unsure. A simple phone call to your local building ...


0

Judging by the picture and your description I'd say those are indeed the adjustment screws that raise and lower the rail of threshold (the part that makes the seal with the bottom of the door). If the door is installed normally removing these will not help you remove the threshold. It will be attached to the jamb via screws that run through the jamb into the ...


3

You should be fine in terms of compressional strength, the more important issue is the point stress load. If the heater has feet of some kind they might punch right through your plywood if they're not over a joist. If you want to be safe you could cut out a square in the floor the size of the heaters footprint, then install blocking around the holes opening ...


1

I consider myself more than handy and I would still hire carpet guys for a new instillation (if for some reason I wanted installed carpet). You ever use one of those knee things? pfft. You are however, looking at a carpet repair. So long as you don't over cut the carpet, you can give it a go. Call guys in if you have unsatisfactory results. Consider dong ...


3

No that quote is too high, especially the 300 side of the quote. You are paying a company, not the installer who gets less than half of that. You should seek out an installer and be able to get that done for ~100, which is reasonable. Doing the job yourself will be a little more difficult than you might want to get involved in. First you need to get the ...



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