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1

If this is what you mean by parquet, I don't suggest it. If water ever penetrates (which it will if spilled on) this floor is over with. That real wood you have there is gorgeous. Refinish it by sanding, stain if you want and varnish it with a lamb's wool mop, using oil-based products. Replace the vinyl with as close a match as possible (same plank width, ...


2

If your sub floor is stiff enough, you can get by with 1/4 plywood. If it bounces, flex's between the joists or creaks when you walk across it you will need a thicker plywood on top to help stiffen the floor. But in general, vinyl is very forgiving as long as the floor it is going over is smooth.


1

Well technically it is plywood, it's just not very good plywood. Having said that I've seen flooring guys use a product that looked very much like luan that was no more than an 1/8 of an inch thick to get the level they needed. This was in a hospital remodel so it was definitely up to code and it went under a commercial grade thermo-sealed floor so it should ...


1

I'll both disagree and agree with @RedGrittyBrick's comment. The best solution is to treat the existing floor as a subfloor and lay a tight new floor over it at right angles or diagonally to the existing boards. Pulling up an existing floor is almost never the best (especially when cost is an object, and it usually is) solution unless it's rotten.


0

Make a jig. Tools required: skill saw with Rip blade and edge guide. Dry wall screws,metal straight edge or string. If the floor is flat, and you have a metal straight edge, you might get a perfect straight cut with two timbers tacked onto plywood with finishing nails on the inside or power-drywall screwed to plywood. Separate the 12' timbers by the ...


1

If the joists are all the same, layout a master on some 1x material then use a pattern maker bit to rout off your pieces (cut off majority of excess with skill saw first). If they are all slightly different use a straight edge or chalk line to establish your line, then cut off with a circular saw. If your floor is really wild scribe the bottom of each piece, ...


0

Strip the old with a flat spade shovel or similar and put down ceramic tile that is cheap and hides dust with a satin finish. The flatter the surface, the bigger your ceramic tiles can be up from 12 to 16". Gap each piece with as small a gap that you can keep straight without notice. Notice the gap in car doors is smaller these days due process control. I ...


0

You can do this yourself with nearly any cutting tool you do have that's capable of making rip cuts, though the farther you get from the optimal tool (a table saw) the harder it will be. If you have a circular saw, you could make the cut freehand, or use a ripping jig. If you have a jigsaw, you can do it freehand or construct your own ripping jig by ...


0

Whilst not a direct answer this thread will give you all the detail you require: http://www.homeownershub.com/uk-diy/filling-holes-in-joists-280701-.htm I'd advise leaving them alone if no sagging has occurred.


1

1) Nails have much greater shear strength and are better than screws when that is a concern, for your application screws are fine. I would use 1 1/2" but 1 3/4" will work too. 2) No. 3) Screws are fine, long enough to grip tight. 4) 1/8" - 1/4" gap? No problem. If you are going to tile it won't matter at all, if it concerns you cover it with tile ...


1

Unless the new joist is undersized, there is no need to sister the new joist to the existing. If the new joist is undersized, sistering to another undersized joist may not provide enough additional section modulus [additional beam width has much less impact than additional beam depth]. If the existing joists are damaged, then it is even less likely they will ...


1

AFAIK, you don't even need the glue, though I'd probably use it myself. 8d might be a hair short. 10d driven at a slight angle (to avoid stickout with whatever size they shaved 2" lumber down to in the latest revision, 1-1/2" is so late 20th century...) might be better, especially if the old joists are from a thicker time in the history of 2" lumber.


1

I don't have any experience to say for sure one way or the other (except that I've not had any notable vibration problems with my front load HE washer on the first floor, which is just sheet vinyl on 3/4" plywood, near the end of the joists). But what I'd think you want is basically the same thing that that you want when you're soundproofing a floor; you ...


0

Many years ago we had the same exact problem. A 1920's porch that had been enclosed with windows and a shore wall below. Our contractor installed shims on top of each 2X6 sloped rafter with the thickest part at the lowest and it was cut at an angle to match the splope thus making it level. Then plywood and tile on top. It's been great for 20 years.


0

Stuffing the open area with fiberglass will absolutely help, as it will dampen/absorb the sound waves resonating between the joists. It will only go so far, though, as a significant amount of energy from foot fall traffic will still be transmitted through the floor and into the joists, causing the sound vibrations in the first place. To combat that, you'll ...


5

It was (and still is) common to float cement on top of the floor for installation of ceramic tile. It provides a level and firm substrate to which tile mortar (thin-set) will adhere. 1 1/2" seems a bit thick though, maybe there were irregularities with the floor which had to be compensated for. I try not to float so thick unless I have to, and now I use ...


1

Especially if you are considering tile, gypcrete (floor leveler - lightweight self-levelling gypsum concrete) might be the best solution. If there's even a remote chance you might ever want in-floor radiant heating, place the PEX tubing for that before pouring the gypcrete (and depending on the floor there now, possibly place an inch of insulation and 1-1/2 ...


7

Install a new plywood subfloor elevated on sleepers to match the existing adjacent floor surfaces. A sleeper is a piece of dimensional lumber (such as a framing stud) ripped to the desired thickness.



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