New answers tagged

0

Do you know what base the adhesive is? I.E. latex, mineral spirits, lacquer? you could try paint stripper, lacquer thinner, (be careful with flames or sparks), or something like Goo Gone, or Goof Off.


3

You are probably quite far from over-specified, if you have significant deflection from walking around. Such are the breaks of self-taught structural engineering, particularly if you don't use the resources of formal structural engineering in your self-teaching. That which will stand up, and that which will stand up without unacceptable deflection from ...


1

I get the impression that the "wobbling" you describe is mostly horizontal. The explanation is fairly simple. Steel is elastic, and therefore requires diagonal bracing to attain rigidity. If you look at the height of your small diagonal braces relative to the height of your corner posts, you can see that they're undersized. I'd shoot for diagonal bracing ...


2

So your issue is one of "deflection", which is resulting from the h-beam joists spanning too far for your liking. The fix would be to determine the deflection you want and then to make sure there are enough cross beams supported by posts that will effectively reduce the span of the original h-beam joists. By placing a single cross beam across the ...


5

My answer over here is probably better suited to your question than it was there. But that was about sistering, you're talking about scabbing (the other answers there may also be helpful). What you are talking about doing is scabbing. Sistering is adding the same dimension board for the full length of the joist. Scabbing is acceptable for individual ...


2

No matter what method you use to strengthen these joists, you will have to jack them up from down below before adding your sister joists or maybe flat steel to the sides of them. The floor will have to be level before bolting anything together. This may destroy your plaster ceiling down below anyway. You may be able to use wood and XPS foam to cushion and ...


1

I would acid etch the old cement with a strong muriatic acid solution to clean and make the surface rough. Then add a adhesive promoter like Moos milk painted on the slab that will help the cement bond and reduce cracking. I have done this on floors as thin as 3/4" and as thick as 2" with good results. With a thin slab a fine aggregate like 1/4" will also ...


1

Plywood. Lay down some sheets and connect them together to stop them shifting if you want to keep them there for a significant period.


0

My problem was fridge rolling back over time and hitting wall. Tried wooden rods, wedges, etc. but they just slid on the tile. Think I've solved problem by getting a rubber cord protector (what you use when you have an extension cord that needs to go across an aisle). Cut to size and wedged under front wheels of fridge. So far so good, rubber doesn't slide ...


1

You certainly wouldn't pour dozens of yards of concrete in there. You'd remove the organic soil, fill it with sand, and pour a 4" slab on that after setting up the plumbing. Alternatively, look at an internal drain tile loop, along with some ventilation. It would be fairly easy to trench in perforated and socked pipe inside the footing. The tough part ...


0

First, re-grade & sculpt the yard as well as possible. Mound-up the front to create a dam effect & also create relief gullies along the house sides so surface water can flow readily around the house & can't sit to soak-in. Like, your front door may be a step up from the front walkway, you'd re-grade up to the door threshold & do a flush new ...



Top 50 recent answers are included