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2

One thing that I have learned in my short life, is that when you are buying a house, always put in clauses so you can get out/get money removed from the asking price if something like this is found to be wrong. With a home inspectors and an engineers opinions, you may be able to get a sizable portion of the price of the house knocked off. Not an expert ...


1

I'd like to add another vote for "this looks bad". To proceed with buying the house, get a written report from an engineer and they use that to get it fixed, or get an allowance at closing to get it fixed. Are there other support poles that the same thing could happen to?


0

You don't give very much information, but just looking at the photo the "foundation" looks like crap. It looks like it is way too thin and the concrete is cheap. Of course, that is the construction style in America now, build crap houses out of crap plywood on crap "slabs" 2-inches thick then wire the whole thing with crap Romex and plumb it with crap PEX ...


1

Though the ceiling height is a constraint I would recommend laying down 3/8" 8'x 4'plywood sheets and shimming them up to level. Lay the hardwood floor on top of that.


4

This may be a problem or non-problem depending on the foundation construction. You'll be much better off consulting an expert who knows how foundations are built in your area and how to diagnose them. One option is that the foundation is designed with separate large thick concrete pads that bear the load and then the space between them is filled with ...


5

Definitely get a home inspector to look over tbe place; there may be other damage from this subsidence... If the price is attractive enough that you'd consider trying to have this redone properly, I'd suggest getting an engineer who know the local soil and hydrology to look at it and tell you what it'd cost to redo this properly. Better to spend a few ...


20

I'm not familiar with USA house construction methods (I live in the UK) but speaking as a mechanical engineer, I wouldn't even stand near that thing while debating how safe it was. That bolt is presumably supposed to be fixing the post against it popping out sideways. I suppose it was meant to be bolted to a metal beam underneath the concrete. So either ...


4

If your gut is telling you to run then run. But if you are still thinking about purchasing the house I would make sure that the builder give you something in writing to back up what he/she is saying. If they are wiling to put it in writing then all is good, as long as they can be found if something does go wrong. Also ask the builder for the compaction tests ...


13

This should make the hairs on your neck stand-up. What my first thought was is the sand fill that the concrete was floated on has been undermined. Is there a sump pump well in the basement? And if so, do you live in an area that gets a lot of rain? Also, what's missing from that photo ( that hasn't been installed) is a concrete footing of some sort to ...


3

They make special screws just for your problem. After you screw it down they break off, leaving the screwed portion below the level of the carpet pad. Do an internet search.


1

You are probably right, spray painting is not a long term option. But if you can't find this piece manufactured in black, spray painting might be your only option. That being said, I would make sure you prime it first (just google spray paint primer) followed by a couple thin coats of black paint. Over time the inside "tracks" will probably wear down, but ...


0

You can sand the floor, and re-finish it. Again have a chair mat which ensures that your floors are protected from the scuffs and scratches that chairs will make as they slide around. You can get one here.


0

Moved into a house with 50's linoleum; LOTS of wax buildup. Tryed one of those fancy 'Floor Polish Removers' at $20 a bottle. It had triethylamine or triethanolamine or some such in it; looked and smelled like 70's vintage floor cleaning chemistry. Bottom line, it didn't work very well on serious wax buildup. Then tried a bottle of Formula 409, developed ...


0

Depending on the depth of the pits, you might be able to use sanded grout to get a nice smooth surface. Just be sure to let it dry and cure before laying down the flooring. You may need to apply it in multiple coats to get a perfect surface.


0

In my experience, the best solution to resolving squeaky and/or isolated "bouncy-ness", is to use adhesive to first attach a small block (typically a 2x4 drop or similar) to the bottom of the floor, then screw this block to the nearest joist. If you were to screw to the joist first, then to the floor, the fastener might pull or push the flooring to meet ...


0

Leaving this as an answer with trepidation and the hope that a real tile expert will chime in. My guess is that they're limestone or travertine. If you have spares, grind/smash/pulverize them to dust, mix that with a 2 part epoxy and fill 'er up. (Same for the broken chips at the door -- glue them solidly down with granite-safe adhesive and fill the cracks ...


1

I agree with keshlam. All you need to do is screw it down. On a normal tile install you seal the the subfloor and screw down the backer-board so this would be no different, the linoleum is just sandwiched between the sub and the hardy. The only down fall is you cant really seal it.


0

Before you apply any stain, try dampening the area with mineral spirits (which will evaporate off fairly quickly, unlike water). That will give you some idea of what color the wood will be if you just apply a clear varnish over it. Also remember that oil-based finishes will tend to add some yellow to the hue (as will shellac). It's possible that you don't ...


0

I don't think adhesive would be needed or helpful; what's really holding the backerboard in place are the screws into the subfloor. The linoleum gets buried and becomes mostly irrelevant.


2

68.57 Pounds per square foot if evenly distributed - call it 70 (or 75) and pull up a calculator (or drop by your lumberyard and have them run it on their I-joist software, which might well be the most affordable solution.) Or hire an engineer. Underbuilt haylofts do have a tendency to demonstrate that they are underbuilt; so don't underbuild it.


1

Its rubbed in oil, dirt and small particles of metal. There is no way on the planet you can get it out. Sanding deep is the only option. You can use oxalic acid, which will bleach the wood and significantly lighten the stains. Oxalic acid is powerful stuff, so be careful.



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