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When wire is used for heating, it is important to ensure either that the wire is of very uniform thickness, or that it is constructed of an alloy whose electrical resistance decreases with heat and fed by a device that will limit current. If those conditions aren't met, the thinner portions of the wire are apt to heat up more than the thicker ones; if ...


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You might try sanding it very lightly with 240 grit sandpaper, then staining it with a light colored stain pen Buy two or three shades and start with the lightest color. Finish it with a wipe on polyurethane (the picture looks like a satin finish) Images and links for illustration only, not an endorsement of particular goods or sources.


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I would "brighten" the bleached area with an oxalic acid based cleaner/brightner, frequently the base chemical in deck cleaners. Neutralize with a base, like baking soda. Once dry, try a dye or a pigmented stain. If the color is close, seal it with a similar finish, typically a satin polyurethane.


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When I come up against this issue when laying floating floors I grind down the higher area. I use my 5" angle grinder and a grinder like this: turbo grinding cup for granite You will generate ALOT of concrete dust. I sometimes cut out a half circle in a 5 gal bucket so I can set it over the angle grinder about half way up the handle. In the other side I ...


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You have 2x6 joists 16" o.c. and lets assume #2 fir- the MAXIMUM spam (where they are supported underneath - bearing the weight) for a 20 lb dead load is 9'10" and for 10 lb dead load: 13' 2" You show 11' +- in photo but it is unclear if there is support at that point. you can check span table at: http://www.awc.org/Publications/update/WFCM2001FullPage.pdf ...


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It will say on the can of paint what the cure time is. The concrete has to be cured about 30 days to apply concrete paint. But the room also has to be dryer than a normal basement. I would run a dehumidifier for a week or so before you paint or if you have heat in the basement turn it on. Some concrete paints need to have a primer/sealer put down if it ...


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I prefer baseboards with no shoe molding. I think it looks cleaner. I believe that show molding is usually installed when adding flooring later. It may be when carpet is replaced or when a flooring guy comes in later during new construction. Baseboards are usually thick enough to cover any expansion gap for the floor.


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Baseboards provide a useful function in a house. They are not purely aesthetic. They protect the bottom of the drywall from being damaged, they build a stopping point for dirt, they keep drywall/paint from being damaged by feet (shoes). Anyone buying a house with drywall walls would expect some sort of minimal baseboard. Shoe molding has three issues. ...


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Traditionally in my area is hardwood, then baseboard and shoe molding. For sure I would put down the floor first. Otherwise whatever baseboard you put in can't be changed out easily, if it's wedged between the wall and the baseboard. Maybe google it and look at photos, pick what you like best.


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It's just a matter of aesthetics. Shoe moulding with no baseboard isn't really considered very nice, but there's certainly no reason it won't work, as long as the shoe moulding you choose is wide enough to cover the expansion gap you leave between the wall and the flooring. However, there's no reason you have to throw away the old baseboard if there's ...


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I suggest you lay down plywood over the planks with subfloor glue and decking screws. After that I would use a thin layer of thinset under the hardiboard (per its installation instructions) and also screw it using the hardi-screws. Install the backer tape as you tile


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The installation manual for HardieBacker suggests to embed it in thin-set and it should be installed over plywood. Thus I would suggest removing the current wood planks flooring, install a 3/4" outdoor grade plywood, thinset and then your HardieBacker (screwed down). All of this is to prevent as much movement in your substrate and avoid cracks in your ...


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I normally would use 1/2" HB for this. However there is a lot that goes into making flooring calculations so you might be OK with 1/4" (but I would go with 1/2"). You will just screw the HB into the planks with backer screws. Try not (don't) screw into the joists below the planks. This should be pretty easy since you have 1/4" view holes in between each. ...


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I have done several tile floors by just screwing the hardie board down and then laying thinset and tile right on top. I only just heard recently that some people recommend that you should lay down thinset under your hardie board. Since you are putting down hardie board on boards with small gaps, I would not recommend trying to put down thinset under it. It ...


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Not an expert but I have installed laminate in 3 rooms in my house. I would go with the light (assuming you mean windows being the light source) rule for the following reasons: Assuming your drawing is to scale, if you eliminate the alcove in front of the closet, the room is almost square making the longest wall rule almost irrelevant. The reflection off ...



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