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1

It depends on the tools you're using/have, and your skill level with said tools. I've installed both "click-lock" laminate, and nail down hardwood flooring. Both took about the same amount of time, and used fairly similar installation techniques. The major difference, was that the hardwood "required" a compressor and flooring nailer/stapler. Linoleum and ...


0

Yes. But it's also the lowest-quality flooring material as its wear surface consists of a picture of wood covered in clear sealer. If you're thinking about installing laminate, go for engineered hardwood or vinyl plank instead; it's the same basic easy-to-DIY system, but the wear layer is actual wood or vinyl. Both will last a lot longer than laminate.


1

I think the most likely cause is that a part of the subfloor has split/broken. You can attack this from below (messy!) or from above (hard to cut hardwood out nicely). The solution would be to support it from below, probably with lumber screwed between joists (though there are many ways to do it). If on the off chance you have a joist that's bad enough to ...


0

For some reason that part of the floor is unsupported. Sometimes it is because a joist is warped and has a bow in it, or is badly cut and has a hollow on the top. If you remove the ceiling below you can potentially see what it is. Normally it is fixed by forcing in shims to the gap, but if the joist is warped over a length, it would be better to jack it. To ...


-1

No apologies needed. To determine the structural strength of that side of the house, get 50 pound bags of concrete and just keep adding them until something cracks or buckles. Then count the bags and fix the broken part of the house. So, for example, if it took 250 bags before it broke, then it means you can add an additional 12,500 pounds of dead weight. ...


1

Ahh, the ancient quest for flatness. You could put down a mortar bed, but it will degrade over time if it is unsurfaced. In general, putting good concrete over bad concrete doesn't work. Trying to flatten just one area of a garage will not be easy. One possible procedure would be to get a jack hammer and remove about 1 to 2 inches of concrete everywhere ...


2

If what you're saying is the tub will be on top of 2x10 at 16" on center spacing, with a span of 9 feet between bearing points that continue down to the foundation, you'll be fine. A drawing of the complex framing you seem to have would help out immensely. I still recommend doing the drawings and getting permits: I have a lot of experience framing houses, ...


0

Do not go with a wood base! You will regret it. A wood base will hold germs and bacteria, and will rot away after so many washes and bird droppings. Always try go with a solid concrete base for birds if possible, or a good solid slab base. You must also be careful of critters digging under and getting through. Ideally you want concrete base, nothing else. ...


0

In my own personal experience of this, the floor is capable of enormous movement, even if you undercut at the skirtings. Avoid long, expanses without expansion joints if possible. My floor used to rise, like a small hill, then open into canyons, dependent on the change in the weather and humidity. Remember too, being on edge, it's strong enough to push a ...


0

We laid thin pad and carpet on a concrete floor in KY basement in 1978. No issues other than carpet style is out if date. Pulled a section for room add and no mold or problem. If dry, personal preference.


0

Wait for it to dry....I have seen parquet that has been completely under water for several days, (and which was warped) to recover completely. Basically there is nothing you can do but wait....everything else would be worse. Recovery depends mostly on type of wood.


0

Here's the process I was told was to use: Spread some sawdust over the curvy board with filler, as if you were going to pile some dirt to even out the field. Use some sand paper to smoothen out the filler, which will stiffen Then coat it with a smooth finish Alternatively, just remove a small sector of the board, turn it into a T formation into a bottom ...


2

Conventional stick framing in North America has you build the floor first, then build a wood wall on that platform. If your pretend world doesn't have lumber mills, then google yurt.


0

I would take yellow pine route a bullnose have home depot scan the flooring being used and stain it it works nice. If u don't have that capability have a guy do it for u it will take about hour to mill it then u stain and clear it.


0

You will have better surface to screw/nail bottom plate working on original concrete as is. You can and should always level before getting floor done.


1

Newer technology: (a) "Floor Comfort" with an R-4.5 rating, moisture and vapor proof and only approx. 1/8" thick, so no issue with existing doors (b) DryBarrier (with raised channels underneath for water drainage) 3/8" thick, was not able to find out R rating.



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