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You could sand down the floors, and refinish them with oil based stain and polyurethane. That should be enough protection to keep the floors from rotting. You could do what they did in the old days and put towels down around the tub and wipe up spills immediately. Standing water will leak through the cracks between the floorboards. You could also good clear ...


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Some generic pieces of advice here: Buy cabinets with a bigger footprint. If a smaller footprint it can work out if there is an equal distance around the bottom. You can lay down mosaics to make a border. It really depends and we would need to see a picture for more help. Anytime you tile a bathroom, tile the whole thing. Cabinets should sit on the ...


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If you mean plastic roll wallbase: Use Liquid Nails or go with real trim.


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I would leave the pitch for your room. I think doing any sort of subfloor is a waste of time if you are laying carpet and could in fact cause long-term issues. As you have already mentioned the baseboards are the only place you will see this. This is actually pretty easy to deal with unless you have cupping, which it sounds like you don't. Throw on ...


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I'd do the floor first. You'll have an easier time with the wall and you won't have to try to level against wooden studs.


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Use some self-leveling mortar or concrete. It's a mortar/concrete that is liquid. You pour it out, and help it a bit and it levels itself automatically. If the slope is extreme (more than an inch or two), then get it semi-close (but lower) with some regular concrete, then finish with the self leveling stuff. You say joists, but are these joists actually ...


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(I'm assuming that you are in the UK). Concrete floors without DPM are not unusual in houses of that age, so there is a possibility that it's not a cowboy job. The broken bitumen you mention was probably the remnants of an asphalt DPM over the slab. The wood has (as you suggest) likely been used to level the concrete. If they were previously joists for a ...


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It doesn't matter unless it is really far off. Also leveling isn't a must do.


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Bare copper will eventually corrode if it is in left in direct contact with concrete over time. You can try wrapping the pipe in duct tape and then covering it with sand, then skim coating over the top with concrete. That way, you could get access to the pipe again if you needed to.


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I would definitely not fill it with concrete until you know what function the pipe has. If you think that it will affect your flooring installation (it might), I would use a more easily removed material to fill the void. Good luck removing a concrete patch without destroying the pipe if for some reason you needed in there someday. Some flooring leveling ...


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Definitely consider the first couple of comments regarding whether the joists are even strong enough to support a floor. Presuming the joists are strong enough, you could probably run firring strips on top of the existing joists, these could be 2x4's on their sides, or you could rip them down to 2x2's. You would either notch them or just cut them and leave ...



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