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Any information you'd glean from this discussion is untrustworthy for the following reasons: No photos. They often reveal issues not mentioned in your short description. No dimensions. In engineering, dimensions are key. No information about construction era or age. That would tell us a lot about common building techniques. No liability. Anyone telling ...


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If the wood is stable (some particle board swells and falls apart) once dry wipe down with hydrogen peroxide to kill any mold spores. Hydrogen peroxide on the floor boards may slightly bleach the wood if left on very long but will take care of mold spores without the smell of bleach. Bleach can also be used but will need to be diluted and will smell bad for ...


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Yes you must remove all of the thinset - FOR SURE. Thinset is not meant to be exposed and a leveler on top of it will not protect it enough. From walking and moving furniture you will end up with chunks of thinset/leveler and it will just be a mess. You either have backer board or plywood under the thinset. You have would really grind off thinset in ...


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Use a solvent degreaser for concrete floors, following manufacturer's instructions, on the oily areas. Then mop with warm water mixed with a bit of liquid laundry detergent and let it dry. If the treated area looks different due to alteration of the "waxy finish", use a hard floor wax remover on the entire floor, again follow instructions. If you wish to ...


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If you aren't seeing new cracks or other signs of this getting worse, it sounds like what you'd expect in an older house. Try supporting your bookshelf with some shims - it might just not be evenly supported where it is, and wobbling because it's unsteady. You'll want to investigate your structure if you see: new cracks forming changes in floor leveling ...


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According to what I've seen, insulating basement ceilings (which is roughly the same as what you asked) has relatively little effect on energy use, though it will make the floors a bit warmer. If you wear slippers or have carpets/rugs, that may not be something you'd ever notice. The usual suggestion for cost-effective energy saving is air sealing first, ...


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My typical answer to these questions is talk to a Licensed Engineer because there are a lot of considerations that are needed. I firmly stand behind that. On this project make sure you're using the correct information. Water ~3,300 pounds Tank ~ 180 pounds, Concrete (4in thick without reinforcement) ~2,400 pounds Piping ? other accessories? Thats ...


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Each bag is .6 cu ft. You have 49 square feet divide by 3 for a 4” slab by 2 for a 6” slab. 49 divided by 3 is 16 cubic feet so it will take just over 27 bags. Expect to use a bit more as you always use more than expected, I would use a wire mesh reinforcement on a hand pour of this size.


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The "correct way" to install this is (in this order) to install the drywall, paint, install baseboard, install flooring, finish baseboard and flooring (assuming it's not tile or carpet), install shoe molding. The drywall should not touch the floor. The baseboard both protects the drywall and hides this gap (which is there to allow for expansion). Wood ...


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If you don't remove asbestos for a living, the realistic impact of one removal job on you is low. Due diligence: use boiling water to loosen the adhesive and to give any dust something to stick to. Use a respirator intended for asbestos, put up dust barriers and when removal is complete, thoroughly ventilate the area and you'll be fine. If you're really ...


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I asked a related question here some time ago. I was told that (a) the safest way to take these up was to heat them and the adhesive so they could be lifted without breaking, and that (b) encapsulating them under another floor was an entirely reasonable approach. Asbestos is not automatically a hazard if it isnt experiencing wear and shedding fibers, just as ...



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