New answers tagged

1

Not sure if this should be a comment or an answer. You will need something on top of the concrete but under the radiant tubing to reflect the heat upward. They do make a metal coated wood for that purpose that has channels already routed out for the tubing. It will ad to the height of your new finished floor. I assume your concrete is on top of earth or ...


0

Looks like you have concrete pillars with 2x's coming out of them. Perhaps you can frame a deck floor space, fastening treated lumber to them and maybe anchoring a joist to the concrete wall. If you anchored to the center posts at concrete pillar, there would be no support problems. Use 2x6, 2x8 should work. Good luck


1

According to this table, the compressive strength of typical lumber when the stress is perpendicular to the grain is around 500 psi or more. Let's say you have four 2x4 joists (on edge) each 3' long. That's a total surface area of the joists of 1.5" x 3' x 4 = 1.5 sq ft = 216 sq in. You've got a 2000 lb heater, but 2000 / 216 << 500 psi. That's a ...


2

Always an interesting choice. Most new construction puts cabinets on the subfloor. One of the reasons for doing this is to avoid damaging the new floors during construction. Floors are one of the last items to complete so it is much easier to install cabinets first. The downside is that when a future remodeling is done, the footprint of the old cabinets ...


2

Normally you would use floor scraper machine, hand held, MK Diamond 14 Amp 1.5 HP Manual Floor Scraper 167676. You might be able to go to a tool rental location as they may have these, we use Sun Belt Tool Rentals here, but there are others. These mechanical scrapers are loud and create heat to scrape the carpet in strips, you may need another machine to ...


1

Depending on the kind of glue (ie., those cheap, self adhereing tiles), a heat gun (or maybe a hair dryer) could help (do not use heat in conjunction with paint thinner). Also, many tiles use water based glues... which you could use on concrete, but if you have wood subfloor, you don't want to (water) damage the wood. Alternative: For the amount of work, ...


2

First the flooring is fine as long as it isn't warped. To me there seems to be three main install issues: You do not have enough gapping around the perimeter of your install. If you are going to glue these down on concrete they would almost assuredly need some space between them - might use 1/32 spacers. The glue dries to brittle. Doubt this glue was ...


2

If it is vinyl sheet flooring, I pulled up as much as possible to get to the layer the glue is bonded to and used paint remover. It soaked through the layers, softened the glue where I could use a 4" drywall taping knife to remove it to the subfloor.


1

Proper way to install double-layer of subfloor? : don't screw the top layer to the joists. And I think, the screws for the backerboard shouldn't hit the bottom layer. I can't seam to find any manufacturers coming forth and prescribing what the maximum size void is that you can fill with thinset, under a CBU. This is probably dependent on whose thinset you ...


1

https://www.ada.gov/regs2010/2010ADAStandards/2010ADAstandards.htm 608.7 Thresholds. Thresholds in roll-in type shower compartments shall be 1/2 inch (13 mm) high maximum in accordance with 303. In transfer type shower compartments, thresholds 1/2 inch (13 mm) high maximum shall be beveled, rounded, or vertical. Ramps(in general) are permitted to be 1:...


0

Pallet wood probably has some variance in thickness. Also there has to be some slight warping. I really really heavy coat of polyurethane could even out the walking area and fill in the gaps. This is provided the subfloor could stop the liquid flow from seeping to whatever is below it.


0

Table epoxy comes to mind, but it certainly wouldn't be a cheap solution. Like Michael Karas said, you have to expect a rustic look with pallet wood.


1

If this is salvaged wood from pallets, you can sand it all down and groove out all the cracks. Then, you can cut little "Dutchmen" to fit those larger cracks, glue them in, and plane that level with the floor. If the larger cracks are sealed, you could then coat the floor with a polyurethane or something similar.


1

If you built a floor out of pallet boards I would expect that the floor would be uneven, have cracks between boards and rough surfaces. That style is pretty much what you get with this type of material!! There is not much that you could do with it except to rip it out and go with something more conventional. You may be able to cover it with a floor leveling ...


2

Assuming that this is a new 4 inches of floor on a ground level structure... No this is definitely not ok. Greenboard is mold resistant. It is, however, still just gypsum with paper over it. Neither is using pressure treated wood as a barrier. Why? Concrete wicks water. Any water near the area will be distributed to be brought into direct contact with ...



Top 50 recent answers are included