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You can get vinyl sheets really cheap especially if you don't care how they look. I have picked up a decent sized sheet for $20 on craigslist. Your other option is polyurethane. 2-3 coats will give you a decent barrier for the water.


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Sounds like a job for self-levelling floor underlayment and sheet vinyl (often misnamed as linoleum where cultural memory has not kept pace with actual materials), vinyl tile, or vinyl plank - most wood laminates are going to blow your 1/4."


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I won't suggest a brand in particular, but there are commercially available cleaners meant specifically for stripping hardwood/pergo/laminated flooring. A quick Amazon/Google search for 'Floor Polish Remover' brings up many options. It appears that this could be quite the project. It appears as though some people also use a large rotary floor ...


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Products like Dricore are designed for scenarios like this. Basically its a piece of plywood with a rubber base. The base has channels in it to allow small amounts of water to run under the floor. These work in scenarios where a bit of moisture is unavoidable. The downside is the cost and can run $2-5 per square foot, but an upside is extra insulation on ...


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A plastic or EDPM rubber sheet will work, if the flooring installers don't puncture it. That pretty well limits your flooring to a floating floor, but that's not a great impediment. Nothing painted on to the inside of a concrete structure will stay put if water is coming from the outside (more commonly seen as failed attempts at "waterproofing the inside ...


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If you can locate your floor joists, you can use a longer, ~2-2.5" finish nail and nail both finish floor and subfloor to the joist. Once the subfloor is tightened down, you can spot nail the finish floor to the subfloor as needed. I did that in my 1928 house and it worked.


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I have had trouble in locations where moisture may contact MDF moldings (hard floors, mop use). Any moisture penetration at mitered corners or cut ends can cause it to swell, a lot. For a kids's room on carpeted floor it's probably OK but not as durable to impact as real wood (think dents and scrapes). However, good prime coat with high quality gloss paint ...


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MDF isn't a terrible choice since it's cheap, easy to work with, and dimensionally stable, but it will be ruined if a decent amount of moisture ever penetrates into it, and the glue used to bind the wood particles together is full of formaldehyde, which is a known carcinogen. Wear a respirator while you're cutting it. If this stuff is for a kid's room, ...


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Solution offered by iLikeDirt is good but not complete; actually it doesn't solve the biggest problem. Fact is that your home has insulation problem that's why ground floor is so cold. You can and should put insulation around perimeter, but you should also out some insolation on the floor. Best solution would be to put it under a concrete slab, but since ...


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Sounds like your concrete slab is un-insulated around the perimeter and/or the bottom. The very conductive flooring material (tile) doesn't help; the combination of these two means that the floor has very little thermal resistance to heat flow, so you constantly lose heat through the slab. If the heat you generate is quickly rising through the second floor, ...



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