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40

I'm not familiar with USA house construction methods (I live in the UK) but speaking as a mechanical engineer, I wouldn't even stand near that thing while debating how safe it was. That bolt is presumably supposed to be fixing the post against it popping out sideways. I suppose it was meant to be bolted to a metal beam underneath the concrete. So either ...


33

I just recently finished my basement project. I spent a lot of time scouring the web and grilling friends and co-workers about their basements to gather information to try to make an informed decision on this very subject. Here are the options I considered: Carpet tiles directly over concrete PROS cheap CONS cold feet hard, unforgiving floors ...


23

Fixing a squeaky floor beneath a carpet is a fairly complicated process that's probably best illustrated with video. This Old House provides a wonderful tutorial. The procedure demonstrated at that link does not require you to pull up any carpet and uses scored screws to hide your work. This seems to be the most hassle-free way to do what one might expect ...


22

This should make the hairs on your neck stand-up. What my first thought was is the sand fill that the concrete was floated on has been undermined. Is there a sump pump well in the basement? And if so, do you live in an area that gets a lot of rain? Also, what's missing from that photo ( that hasn't been installed) is a concrete footing of some sort to ...


18

That's the worst job I've ever seen at installing quarter round. As others have said, your installer was incredibly lazy. There are several different techniques that could be used for terminating the corner rounds in both the corners and at the ends. A simple 45° miter is the simplest for both inside and outside corners. If you want to get fancy, you can ...


16

With these types of tiles you do not want them to break as they are harder to demo when they are in bits and shards. If you try to use a scraper (even power) what inevitably ends up happening is the top of the tile comes off, leaving the much harder to remove bottom on. Also this method severely damages the subfloor, sometimes to the point that you will ...


15

Exceptionally unprofessional work. The quarter rounds should be mitered together at a minimum. They're not even touching at all in your second and third pictures. It's just cosmetic, though. Not gonna hurt anything except your aesthetic preferences.


12

I have done both a refinish and a new install, and did a bunch of research before choosing. These are my generalized conclusions about the different choices: Linseed / Tung Oil Pros: Easy to apply Relatively durable Quick curing and drying times Cons: Will darken with age Provides very little protection against wood ...


12

I'm really fascinated by your question and suggested solutions. I am glad to hear that you question the wisdom of some of the suggestions. There are a few factors that are important to consider before picking a solution. What type of hardwood flooring are you thinking of using? Nail down, staple down, glue down or floating? With any type but a floating ...


12

Sub Floor Sub floor material can depend on what type of floor is going to be installed on top of it, and the joist spacing. Typically if the joists are 16" on center (OC) or less, you can use 5/8" tongue and groove plywood glued and screwed to the joists. larger joist spacing calls for 3/4" tongue and groove plywood, again glued and screwed to the joists. ...


12

If the condition has developed over time, you can try tightening all of the screws on the hinges. If any of the screws keep turning then you can replace them with longer screws so that they grip the stud behind the frame and pull the door up. If you recently installed carpet or a new floor then you will need to plane the bottom of the door with either a ...


12

I prefer working from under the floor when possible. Although it is easier to screw loose flooring down from the top, it is often difficult to fill the holes and make the color and finish match. Using the top down method is a last resort, especially if you have a large area to secure. The Counter Snap screws mentioned in the previous answer are great ...


12

Any information you'd glean from this discussion is untrustworthy for the following reasons: No photos. They often reveal issues not mentioned in your short description. No dimensions. In engineering, dimensions are key. No information about construction era or age. That would tell us a lot about common building techniques. No liability. Anyone telling ...


11

Per the wording of that code, you can't be adding anything to the floor or the ceiling as you'll be under the 7' minimum. You could consider a super-thin flooring (stain the concrete? Linoleum?) and then, as you suggest, put the sheetrock between the joists (though that sounds like a finishing nightmare). Alternatively, raise the foundation (likely cost ...


11

Most refrigerators have adjustable feet that can be "unscrewed" in order to level the fridge. All you need to do is "unscrew" these feet until the wheels are slightly off the floor.


11

Definitely get a home inspector to look over tbe place; there may be other damage from this subsidence... If the price is attractive enough that you'd consider trying to have this redone properly, I'd suggest getting an engineer who know the local soil and hydrology to look at it and tell you what it'd cost to redo this properly. Better to spend a few ...


10

Well it depends on the output of the radiant floor, but in general yes they are sufficient to heat a room. We have underfloor heating (hot water with heat spreader plates under floorboards) in our upstairs rooms and they warm the rooms quite well. The floors are warm to touch (as would be expected). The temperature of the room is more uniform the heat is ...


9

Looking at different images may help you determine the species. Keep in mind I'm not a wood expert, and wood being a natural material will vary widely. Oak Oak tends to have a bold tight grain Ash Ash tends to have a bold semi-tight grain. Hickory Hickory tends to have a more subtle longer grain. Maple Maple tends to have a subtle semi-tight ...


8

There is a dremel tool called the multi-max that I have used before. You can get a diamond attachment for it that will cut through grout like butter. Once you get the grout out you should be able pop up the tile and replace it.


8

If your basement is really dry as you suggest, carpeting directly on top is fine. To test: Take a 1x1m sheet of plastic (garbage bag would do) and tape it to the floor making sure it's sealed all the way around. Leave it there for 24h at least and see if moisture appears at the bottom. If it's bone dry, you should be OK. We renovated our basement and based ...


8

Depending on how un-level, and the sub-floor material/condition, one option would be to use self-leveling compound. You pour it over the entire floor, it "finds" level (it has a viscosity that allows it to flow until it begins to harden) and let it set up. And Voila! level subfloor.


8

Other than engineered Joists, which are also made of wood products, the only alternative are steel I-beams with a wood nailer. That is of course you want to go complete commercial with steel and concrete panel floors. You better have a very fat wallet and an engineer to sign off for the modification in Mass. Such a deviation from standard residential ...


8

The main cause of wood floors squeaking is wood shrinkage around the nails. If you can localize the areas that are the worst, a common way to minimize squeaks is to drive screws up from the bottom through the subfloor into the hardwood. Be absolutely sure to use screws that are long enough to grab the hardwood, but short enough not to stick through. If you ...


8

You likely need flat, not level. And for that, all you really need is some sort of a long, straight edge. A yard stick works pretty well ... just place it down anywhere you think there might be a dip or bump, and if the yard stick is flat against the floor its whole length, you're fine. As for the implications of not having it flat, I'm not sure for ...


8

Drywall screws are for drywall any other use and the heads tends to snap off. Wood screws are what you are after. Also, be careful, if you have an old floor it is NOT 3/4 anymore because of shrinkage due to drying out and from resurfacing. Same for the sub floor, it is not 3/4 anymore especially since they are probably pine. I would not go up through the ...


8

What about rubber furniture cups? If they are not deep enough, you could cut a channel in the center to set the fridge leg/wheel deeper.


8

If your gut is telling you to run then run. But if you are still thinking about purchasing the house I would make sure that the builder gives you something in writing to back up what he/she is saying. If they are wiling to put it in writing then all is good, as long as they can be found if something does go wrong. Also ask the builder for the compaction ...


7

It might be worth checking out the subfloor if you can get access to it in case that is what is not holding up to weight instead of the joists. Otherwise, I know in your comment you stated that you don't have the joists exposed, unfortunately, I don't know of a way to resolve the issue without exposing them as anything you tried to do at the floor level ...



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