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26

I just recently finished my basement project. I spent a lot of time scouring the web and grilling friends and co-workers about their basements to gather information to try to make an informed decision on this very subject. Here are the options I considered: Carpet tiles directly over concrete PROS cheap CONS cold feet hard, unforgiving floors ...


24

Fixing a squeaky floor beneath a carpet is a fairly complicated process that's probably best illustrated with video. This Old House provides a wonderful tutorial. The procedure demonstrated at that link does not require you to pull up any carpet and uses scored screws to hide your work. This seems to be the most hassle-free way to do what one might expect ...


12

I have done both a refinish and a new install, and did a bunch of research before choosing. These are my generalized conclusions about the different choices: Linseed / Tung Oil Pros: Easy to apply Relatively durable Quick curing and drying times Cons: Will darken with age Provides very little protection against wood ...


12

Sub Floor Sub floor material can depend on what type of floor is going to be installed on top of it, and the joist spacing. Typically if the joists are 16" on center (OC) or less, you can use 5/8" tongue and groove plywood glued and screwed to the joists. larger joist spacing calls for 3/4" tongue and groove plywood, again glued and screwed to the joists. ...


12

If the condition has developed over time, you can try tightening all of the screws on the hinges. If any of the screws keep turning then you can replace them with longer screws so that they grip the stud behind the frame and pull the door up. If you recently installed carpet or a new floor then you will need to plane the bottom of the door with either a ...


11

Most refrigerators have adjustable feet that can be "unscrewed" in order to level the fridge. All you need to do is "unscrew" these feet until the wheels are slightly off the floor.


10

I'm really fascinated by your question and suggested solutions. I am glad to hear that you question the wisdom of some of the suggestions. There are a few factors that are important to consider before picking a solution. What type of hardwood flooring are you thinking of using? Nail down, staple down, glue down or floating? With any type but a floating ...


10

Per the wording of that code, you can't be adding anything to the floor or the ceiling as you'll be under the 7' minimum. You could consider a super-thin flooring (stain the concrete? Linoleum?) and then, as you suggest, put the sheetrock between the joists (though that sounds like a finishing nightmare). Alternatively, raise the foundation (likely cost ...


10

I prefer working from under the floor when possible. Although it is easier to screw loose flooring down from the top, it is often difficult to fill the holes and make the color and finish match. Using the top down method is a last resort, especially if you have a large area to secure. The Counter Snap screws mentioned in the previous answer are great ...


9

Well it depends on the output of the radiant floor, but in general yes they are sufficient to heat a room. We have underfloor heating (hot water with heat spreader plates under floorboards) in our upstairs rooms and they warm the rooms quite well. The floors are warm to touch (as would be expected). The temperature of the room is more uniform the heat is ...


8

If your basement is really dry as you suggest, carpeting directly on top is fine. To test: Take a 1x1m sheet of plastic (garbage bag would do) and tape it to the floor making sure it's sealed all the way around. Leave it there for 24h at least and see if moisture appears at the bottom. If it's bone dry, you should be OK. We renovated our basement and based ...


8

There is a dremel tool called the multi-max that I have used before. You can get a diamond attachment for it that will cut through grout like butter. Once you get the grout out you should be able pop up the tile and replace it.


8

Depending on how un-level, and the sub-floor material/condition, one option would be to use self-leveling compound. You pour it over the entire floor, it "finds" level (it has a viscosity that allows it to flow until it begins to harden) and let it set up. And Voila! level subfloor.


8

It sounds like the joists aren't properly fixed to the walls or they aren't big enough for the task at hand - keeping your floors up. I'd get another builder in to take a look and quote for remedial work and then try and get the first builder to either sort out the problem or pay for someone else to do the work.


8

The main cause of wood floors squeaking is wood shrinkage around the nails. If you can localize the areas that are the worst, a common way to minimize squeaks is to drive screws up from the bottom through the subfloor into the hardwood. Be absolutely sure to use screws that are long enough to grab the hardwood, but short enough not to stick through. If you ...


7

I'd grind/scrape away the grout first and then gently tap the middle of the tile with a screwdriver until it shatters and chip it out. It'll probably take a while to do it but you should be able to scrape/chip away the old thinset, apply new thinset then regrout. best of luck !


7

I suspect the previous answer will rarely apply to the problem as reported by OP. Most likely the floor isn't "solid" hardwood (ie - it's probably not 2-3cm thick floorboards laid directly over joists that have sagged). I've often seen what OP describes on "click-lock" flooring, where interlocking 6-10mm thick panels are used to "tile" the area. The panels ...


7

Other than engineered Joists, which are also made of wood products, the only alternative are steel I-beams with a wood nailer. That is of course you want to go complete commercial with steel and concrete panel floors. You better have a very fat wallet and an engineer to sign off for the modification in Mass. Such a deviation from standard residential ...


7

Smaller tiles are less likely to crack on the tile itself, the joints will give first. But larger tiles are stronger in general. That said, you should work on increasing the strength of your floor before tiling if you are concerned about cracking. If you can access the joists, sister any weak places between two load bearing points. On the floor itself, ...


7

You likely need flat, not level. And for that, all you really need is some sort of a long, straight edge. A yard stick works pretty well ... just place it down anywhere you think there might be a dip or bump, and if the yard stick is flat against the floor its whole length, you're fine. As for the implications of not having it flat, I'm not sure for ...


7

The floor doesn't have to be completely flat as long as any bumps or hollows are relatively shallow (like rolling hills rather than mountain peaks and valleys). If there are gaps or ridges in the floor then this will create areas where the linoleum will wear more than the rest of the floor. This is because there will be movement of the linoleum where it can ...


7

There are small radiant heat mats commonly used under tile in bathrooms. These are electric and can be thermostatically controlled. They are safe to use under carpet and thin type wood flooring. The mats are apx 30inches by 15 inches and can be connected together to cover the desired area. Both the heater mats and controllers are avail at the home ...


7

Drywall screws are for drywall any other use and the heads tends to snap off. Wood screws are what you are after. Also, be careful, if you have an old floor it is NOT 3/4 anymore because of shrinkage due to drying out and from resurfacing. Same for the sub floor, it is not 3/4 anymore especially since they are probably pine. I would not go up through the ...


7

You shouldn't be able to damage a concrete floor by jumping up and down on it. There will be sound transmission (as you've noticed) and there might be some movement in the floor if it's not properly tied into the walls. This would be more likely with a wooden floor supported by joists as there is more natural movement in wood than concrete. If there is ...


6

The cause is generally that the flooring or subfloor is not securely attached to the joists underneath. Usually this happens because the joist settle or bend over time and the flooring becomes loose or detached in spots. If you can get underneath the floor and find the soft spots (say from the basement or crawlspace?), you'll likely see that there is a gap ...


6

When I've done grout repair I've cleaned out the old grout, did some slight prodding to see if anything else was loose, made sure the area was bone dry and then got a small batch of grout from the local hardware store. You can probably buy a small tub of the premixed grout (unless you have colored grout then you're stuck buying a larger tub usually). I just ...


6

Here's what we've done so far. I'm curious whether there may be better techniques... R-19 batts between joists to reduce noise transmission through air liquid nails on top of joists to reduce squeeking subfloor first layer of 1/2 inch plywood "green glue", a gummy substance to reduce foot fall noise transmission second layer of 1/2 inch plywood rosin ...


6

I have used "Counter-Snap" through vinyl and carpet, and it worked great. All it takes is to locate the squeak, insert the patented “snap off” screw into the fixture, drill it down and let it snap off.


6

The question is about electric radiant floor heating. I, too, have hot water radiant floor heating...it is CHEAP, and the MOST efficient way to heat a room. The electric floor "sheets" that are put down prior to tile, are not an efficient way to heat an entire room...very expensive to run for a long period of time, and not "green". However, it is an ...



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