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Instead of patch repair solutions for the ductwork in the foundation, have you considered looking into quotes to add new ductwork along the ceiling of your walkout basement by branching off the ductwork under the house on top of the hill. You could then add ceiling vents that should never have water issues. In the short term, this could be a costlier option,...


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Just for future readers, I ended up bringing in structural engineers who found my basement wall was bowing from the stress of the soil outside the house (becomming water-logged, freezing, expanding, etc.). This was also the cause of the vertical crack/fissure that opened up, which was my chief complaint in the original question above. The solution they sold ...


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Problem #1: You have under-slab ducts. These are bad because they can flood, harbor mold, and increase the dampeness of the house, and let in creepy-crawlies. Problem #2: when it rains, water gets under your slab--and floods the ducts! This means you have very poor drainage and a high water table. The best solution to this problem would be to seal up your ...


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City employee, talked the boss into buying us a shop vac about 5 years ago ,so i saw the one with a built in "water pump",at Lowes and gave it try. Why not? Not my money if it turns out to be junk, lol. I used it to clean out one of our sump pump pits at the bottom of one of our dry wells at a sewer pump station . everything is around 40 feet straight down ...


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Clear PVC does exist and you might be able to locate some from Commercial Industial Supply (for example). With regard to gluing wire (insulation) to PVC, a copious amount of epoxy or silicone should work. Luckily, the pressure should not be extreme. The most important instruction is to drill the hole just large enough to slide the wire though without ...


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It depends on what type of failure are you talking about. The rate at which water flows from a leak, is going to depend on the size of the leak. It could range anywhere from less than 1 ml per day, to the full supply flow rate. If it's a catastrophic failure, you could be talking about the full contents spilling out in a matter of seconds/minutes, followed ...


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Sounds like it will be a lot cheaper and easier to create a drain field in your grassy area. Good luck!


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You certainly wouldn't pour dozens of yards of concrete in there. You'd remove the organic soil, fill it with sand, and pour a 4" slab on that after setting up the plumbing. Alternatively, look at an internal drain tile loop, along with some ventilation. It would be fairly easy to trench in perforated and socked pipe inside the footing. The tough part ...


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It depends a bit on what the actual problem is. A mason won't likely have the answers you need, which are related to water management. If it's a surface drainage issue, call a landscaper to raise grade and create slope, and/or a rain gutter specialist. If it's a water table problem, call an excavator to install exterior drain tile and better backfill ...


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How awful. The studs and plastic were a terrible mistake. I think you are absolutely on the right track to replace everything with materials that are not degraded by water. Basements gonna flood. Re-doing any basement wall that's made of concrete is easy in principle. Cover any such wall with 3-4" of foam insulation board (EPS, XPS, or polyiso), and seal ...


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The plastic is a vapor barrier. It's used because these are unfaced fiberglass insulation batts. In cold climates, the vapor barrier prevents moisture within the living space from penetrating into and condensing in the cooler insulation where it reduces the insulating properties or worse, freezes. When its replaced, there will need to be some sort of ...


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There are products that can automatically open and close the water lines to the washing machine when it senses that the washer is turned on or off. They tend to also included a leak sensor as well to protect if a leak occurs when operating. Example: http://www.watts.com/pages/_products_details.asp?pid=3427 They also have retrofit versions: http://media....


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I'm adding this as answer because I really think this is a solution that will work for you, even though as written, I really can't call it a duplicate. Check out this question and related answers: How can I turn off the power to an outlet if a water alarm is triggered? The basic idea is to get a device that cuts power to the washer if water is detected. ...


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Your window well should already have a drain that ties into the drain tiles around your foundation. This is likely already tied into your sump. Often over time the drains get clogged up and filled with debris. The solution is to dig out the window well and unclog the drain. You should have about a foot of crushed gravel that stops 6" below the window level ...


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Pumping the water above ground, or below ground doesn't matter. Moving the water far enough away (downhill) from the house is the key. If your plumbing is underground, it has to go somewhere. The pipe can't just come to an end. You'll want to drain into a dry well, ditch, storm sewer, spillway, stream, etc. If your pumping out onto the ground. You'll ...


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If your renting, your only concern, I would think, is the smell. If there is a smell it will disappear as soon as the water dries up. When I fixed my mothers house the smell was supposedly there for years. It was caused by a slowly leaking toilet. When it was fixed, it took some weeks for the floor to completely dry, and the smell went away. You may have ...


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I use mine twice a year to dredge the bottom of a 15,000 gallon pool that is now a pond. Detritus sucks up easily, I just stop before it fills and drain it into the grass... then repeat. Takes an afternoon but the fish and grass are both happy.



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