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Instead of patch repair solutions for the ductwork in the foundation, have you considered looking into quotes to add new ductwork along the ceiling of your walkout basement by branching off the ductwork under the house on top of the hill. You could then add ceiling vents that should never have water issues. In the short term, this could be a costlier ...


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Glue-down garage door seal (sometimes called threshold seal) sounds like what you want. A rubber bump.


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You removed the 1 way check valve, likely part of the pump, when you cut the line to the pump. Your sump being low, already had a syphon ready to go, it just needed one last push to get started. The pump of one of your neighbors started and everything in the pipes of all 4 pipes came flowing into your sump. Your son witnessed an excellent lesson in ...


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Problem #1: You have under-slab ducts. These are bad because they can flood, harbor mold, and increase the dampeness of the house, and let in creepy-crawlies. Problem #2: when it rains, water gets under your slab--and floods the ducts! This means you have very poor drainage and a high water table. The best solution to this problem would be to seal up your ...


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City employee, talked the boss into buying us a shop vac about 5 years ago ,so i saw the one with a built in "water pump",at Lowes and gave it try. Why not? Not my money if it turns out to be junk, lol. I used it to clean out one of our sump pump pits at the bottom of one of our dry wells at a sewer pump station . everything is around 40 feet straight down ...


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How awful. The studs and plastic were a terrible mistake. I think you are absolutely on the right track to replace everything with materials that are not degraded by water. Basements gonna flood. Re-doing any basement wall that's made of concrete is easy in principle. Cover any such wall with 3-4" of foam insulation board (EPS, XPS, or polyiso), and seal ...


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The plastic is a vapor barrier. It's used because these are unfaced fiberglass insulation batts. In cold climates, the vapor barrier prevents moisture within the living space from penetrating into and condensing in the cooler insulation where it reduces the insulating properties or worse, freezes. When its replaced, there will need to be some sort of ...


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There are products that can automatically open and close the water lines to the washing machine when it senses that the washer is turned on or off. They tend to also included a leak sensor as well to protect if a leak occurs when operating. Example: http://www.watts.com/pages/_products_details.asp?pid=3427 They also have retrofit versions: ...


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I'm adding this as answer because I really think this is a solution that will work for you, even though as written, I really can't call it a duplicate. Check out this question and related answers: How can I turn off the power to an outlet if a water alarm is triggered? The basic idea is to get a device that cuts power to the washer if water is detected. ...


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Pumping the water above ground, or below ground doesn't matter. Moving the water far enough away (downhill) from the house is the key. If your plumbing is underground, it has to go somewhere. The pipe can't just come to an end. You'll want to drain into a dry well, ditch, storm sewer, spillway, stream, etc. If your pumping out onto the ground. You'll ...


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Honestly that seems fine to me. For added peace of mind, you can spray it with bleach. If you live in a particularly dry and sunny climate, you could also leave it out in the sun on some concrete. I live in the desert and this works great; the sun dries and disinfects anything in hours. What you should be more worried about is your drywall. Poke it with ...


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I had a similar problem, I made a 1" high, 3" wide concrete bump using some angled wood strips to hold it until set. The two strips were joined using small cross-bracing pieces of wood screwed from above. The strips were something like a 6 or 7 foot length of 2x1" wood at about 45 degrees to the ground. I made the concrete bump in sections that length. I ...


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If water is coming up through the pipe then it is because either your sewer is clogged, you septic tank is full or the leaching field has failed. What you are seeing is a sewage backup. It could be ground water entering your septic tank, or it could also be sewage from elsewhere in the house. The basement toilet is the lowest drain in the house and this is ...


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I know that my answer will not be a proper one (ok, you may downvote if you wish...), but my experience tells me that it's a serious problem. Cracks on walls always tell that something serious is around. My advice is to find a civil engineer/specialist to make a proper judgement of this matter. I strongly reccomend that, and I guess that this question will ...


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If your renting, your only concern, I would think, is the smell. If there is a smell it will disappear as soon as the water dries up. When I fixed my mothers house the smell was supposedly there for years. It was caused by a slowly leaking toilet. When it was fixed, it took some weeks for the floor to completely dry, and the smell went away. You may have ...


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I use mine twice a year to dredge the bottom of a 15,000 gallon pool that is now a pond. Detritus sucks up easily, I just stop before it fills and drain it into the grass... then repeat. Takes an afternoon but the fish and grass are both happy.



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