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7

General practice is going 6 inches above molded area and cut it out. You must inspect the backside of the drywall. If you can't you need to keep cutting out until you hit 6 inches of unaffected wall. You then need to follow a mold remediation plan - not sure how anything else in the wall looks but useless replacing the drywall if you will put up new ...


7

Some Shop Vacs have a "water pump" feature. You can attach a garden hose to a side port on the vac, and rather than just dumping the water in the canister, it will actually pump the water to another location. http://www.shopvac.com/wet-dry-vacs/default.aspx?feature=12&featureName=Water+Pump If you do not have such a vac, you can suck water until the ...


6

For the case of the power outages, there's basically two options -- UPS or other battery backup for the sump pump. (which only helps for as long as the batteries hold out) A water powered sump pump As for the flash flood issues -- you might be able to either regrade the area to change the catchment area that drains towards the door, and possibly add a ...


6

From the looks of it, water could run right around your grate to the door. If the walkway is sloped toward the grate on both sides, that would probably help when the rain is light, but when it is heavy it will run right around it. I would install a grate that runs across the whole width of the walkway. Under the grate, I would have a trench about a foot ...


5

In addition to the other comments, the garden hose may also be causing the problem. It may not allow enough flow of water to leave the basin fast enough. We have 1.5" pvc leaving the sump pump and that pipe discharges into the yard. Can you use the PVC that you said you have going into the yard instead of having the hose in the PVC?


4

Before you jump too far, you should figure out the exact source of the water. When you're talking about puddles and streams, I'm thinking leaks and cracks, and not moisture coming through the concrete. To check for moisture in the concrete, tape a large square piece of clear vinyl down using duct tape (at least a foot square) at a time when the floor is ...


3

Water damage isn't easy to deal with, here are the steps off the top of my head: Shutoff the water Get the water out, via floor drains, buckets, submersible pump, or a shop vac. I'd recommend the shop vac for being a fairly handy tool everyone should own. Dry the area, and remove anything damaged by the water. Use fans, open windows, and/or dehumidifiers ...


2

Yes, this is definitely home improvement material. What's the terrain like around your house? Could you dig a trench sloping downhill from the low point in your basement to "daylight" (ie, somewhere, like a ditch the water could drain away to without a pump?) As for it getting worse, could something have clogged up to cause more water to come in - your ...


1

I am assuming you mean water is getting into your basement and the sidewalk connects to your foundation. My First step would be to try and seal where the sidewalk touches to foundation. There is probably a crack there where the water is getting in. The best sealant would come in a caulk tube make sure it is flexible and made for concrete. Do not get the ...


1

Your best answer would be to try to eliminate the water before it gets in. Your best options will depend on the reliability of your electric source. A battery pump will only last so long. A watered powered pump will require a steady flow of municiple water. If you have a well it obviously won't work without power. The other consideration is how easily can ...


1

EDIT: Comments above say that you have 1-2" of water. There is no solution for this other than fixing the drain. (Or going to marine style doors with a raised threshold.) What I've describe below can mitigate minor flooding, but won't help with the serious issue you seem to be having. ORIGINAL ANSWER: The proper long term answer is to fix the the ...


1

Put in one of these. It's a French Drain, it is also on this sites FAQ. How to build a french drain? The need for a French Drain arises from a few problems, but usually from standing water in or around your home. This is caused by poor drainage, usually from clay rich soil or overly compacted soil. A French Drain will relocate the water very efficently. ...


1

Obviously, the pump can't keep up with the amount of water pouring in. As mohlsen said, the outlet hose is way too small. I've never seen one < 1.5" diameter. It needs to be a lot bigger than it is. If that doesn't solve the problem completely, you probably need to upgrade to a larger sump pump. If you have frequent power outages when it rains, you need ...


1

On some TV show I was watching, they showed the cleanup of a house with a severe mold problem. The procedure was to strip everything back to the studs and subfloor and clean with a media-blaster. Instead of sand, they used small dry ice pellets. It basically took off the top layer of wood from the studs and rafters. Since it was dry ice, there was no ...


1

I agree with Jeff's comment on this one. Once the mold smell is in there it's hard to get rid of. I've been in houses with moldy basements and they tried to use bleach to clear it up. The bleach cleaned out the mold but the smell still lingered. One thing you COULD try (and I'm not saying this'll work) is to hire a company that specializes in flood or crime ...



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