Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

Your pictures are showing that it will be necessary to remove the existing drain lines up to the place where there is free pipe to cut into thus allow gluing in a new coupling. It will unlikely for there to be a decent way to fix this by any other means. Any type of cobbled together "fix" is always going to be a potential weak spot in the system ripe for ...


3

The flange needs to be sitting flush with (or not more than 1/8" above) the finished floor or else the toilet will rock. The flange should be fastened to the floor. Dry fit the toilet to make sure it doesn't rock. If it does rock, use shims to prevent rocking - just tightening the bolts probably will not stop the rocking but will risk cracking the toilet ...


1

We would usually screw it down during the rough in. Having said that I personally see nothing wrong with cementing it to the exit pipe below. Although not my first choice I have seen installs last many many years without screwing in the flange. For example for basement bathrooms I would just attach the flange via cement. Also if you have the PVC cemented ...


1

I may be seeing this wrong, and correct me if I am, but I believe the last elbow to the flange is a street elbow, and the flange fit OVER the small end of the street elbow. The fix may be a lot simpler and cheaper than you think. There are toilet flanges that glue into the interior diameter of the waste pipe. Since the last elbow is a street elbow, the ...


1

When the nut is stuck that well, the basket has a tendency to start to slip before the nut. So instead of twisting the nut loose, you'll end up spinning the basket. At this point it's likely you'll have to replace the basket anyway, so trying to save it could be a moot point. I'd start by trying to crack the nut. Use a hacksaw blade or oscillating tool, ...


1

A sufficiently large strap wrench could be used. But at some point tool cost may approach the cost of fixture replacement.


1

Another idea that may be necessary if the thing is so rusted and corroded is to cut the lower section of the basket assembly off. This can be done by several methods. The easiest one may be to cut into the side of the lower assembly along one side (vertically) with a Dremel tool with a cutoff wheel. It may be necessary to cut it on only one side or both. ...


1

A Tub Drain Removal Wrench might help in this scenario. These can be found at your local home improvement or plumbing supply store. You might be able to turn the drain instead of the bolt in order to remove it.


1

Tap (don't overdo it and break the "ears") with a hammer and nail or hammer and punch against the projecting "ears" - and do as many of them as you can easily reach, rather than only tapping on the most accessible one (at least until the thing starts to move.) Scribe a line before you start that goes across both parts so you can detect even a small ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible