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11

Removing the old pipe First you want to make sure the section of pipe that will remain, is properly supported (you don't want it falling). Then you'll want to install some temporary supports, to catch the portion of the pipe that you'll be removing. Use a chain cutter, hammer and cold chisel, or grinder to break the pipe a few inches before the hub on the ...


7

For cutting the pipe, go rent a chain pipe cutter (aka soil pipe cutter). It will make short work of the pipe and not be too messy. It will make a clean enough edge that a Fernco coupling (like you have a picture of) will work fine. Obviously you will need to add some strapping to secure the horizontal run of iron pipe if you go this route because you ...


6

There isn't much allowance for raised flanges in most US toilets I've seen. The critical feature is how much higher the under toilet "ceiling" is than the bottom perimeter base that sits on the finished floor. Since this dimension is intended to work with a standard wax ring, there's little chance a 3/4" protrusion will work. Not only do you need physical ...


5

You can purchase a toilet flange repair at any big box hardware store. Remove the wax ring (buy a new one), remove the bolts, and mount this on top of the existing broken flange: Then reattach the toilet as per normal, making sure not to over tighten. Tip, seat the toilet firmly on the wax ring before you tighten the bolts, and use a STANDARD sized wax ...


3

Your pictures are showing that it will be necessary to remove the existing drain lines up to the place where there is free pipe to cut into thus allow gluing in a new coupling. It will unlikely for there to be a decent way to fix this by any other means. Any type of cobbled together "fix" is always going to be a potential weak spot in the system ripe for ...


3

The flange needs to be sitting flush with (or not more than 1/8" above) the finished floor or else the toilet will rock. The flange should be fastened to the floor. Dry fit the toilet to make sure it doesn't rock. If it does rock, use shims to prevent rocking - just tightening the bolts probably will not stop the rocking but will risk cracking the toilet ...


3

It probably doesn't matter much one way or the other since it's unlikely for water to get that far. I personally would not bother. Consider this: If water were to get that far, you would want to know about this and take action. If it's sealed, water could just sit there unnoticed, rotting out anything it touches. If it leaked down and stained the ceiling, ...


2

This will depend on several things: How are you securing your toilet, are you bedding in cement which will raise the pan off the floor anyway, or are you using a flexible sealant (silicon) and pan screws which will have the pan flush on the floor Does the pan you intend on installing have the outlet pipe recessed eg. if you turn the toilet pan upside down ...


2

I can think of two other solutions depending on the whole picture: 1 - What kind of PVC 90 are you using to get from horizontal to vertical? If you are using a regular sweep 90 you might be able to switch to a street sweep 90 combined with a different flange that would glue to the outside of the 90. This may allow you to push the flange down farther to make ...


2

I've seen some discussion here of fancy plumber tools (a bit too expensive for the amount of use anyone but a plumber would put them to, unless you can find them in a rental store) that apply heat and grip/pull things apart. Other than that (which I've never seen or used, only seen mentioned), I'm prone to consider PVC joints as forever, so the stock ...


1

Usually if the flange is not high enough, a larger wax ring is used or stack two wax rings together. Yours sounds like it is lower than any I have ever encountered. A good plumber with an internal pipe cutter could cut it with out damaging the floor, add a coupler, and with some proper material to hold the flange at the right height, reset a new flange. Seal ...


1

We would usually screw it down during the rough in. Having said that I personally see nothing wrong with cementing it to the exit pipe below. Although not my first choice I have seen installs last many many years without screwing in the flange. For example for basement bathrooms I would just attach the flange via cement. Also if you have the PVC cemented ...


1

I may be seeing this wrong, and correct me if I am, but I believe the last elbow to the flange is a street elbow, and the flange fit OVER the small end of the street elbow. The fix may be a lot simpler and cheaper than you think. There are toilet flanges that glue into the interior diameter of the waste pipe. Since the last elbow is a street elbow, the ...


1

When the nut is stuck that well, the basket has a tendency to start to slip before the nut. So instead of twisting the nut loose, you'll end up spinning the basket. At this point it's likely you'll have to replace the basket anyway, so trying to save it could be a moot point. I'd start by trying to crack the nut. Use a hacksaw blade or oscillating tool, ...


1

A sufficiently large strap wrench could be used. But at some point tool cost may approach the cost of fixture replacement.


1

Another idea that may be necessary if the thing is so rusted and corroded is to cut the lower section of the basket assembly off. This can be done by several methods. The easiest one may be to cut into the side of the lower assembly along one side (vertically) with a Dremel tool with a cutoff wheel. It may be necessary to cut it on only one side or both. ...


1

A Tub Drain Removal Wrench might help in this scenario. These can be found at your local home improvement or plumbing supply store. You might be able to turn the drain instead of the bolt in order to remove it.


1

Tap (don't overdo it and break the "ears") with a hammer and nail or hammer and punch against the projecting "ears" - and do as many of them as you can easily reach, rather than only tapping on the most accessible one (at least until the thing starts to move.) Scribe a line before you start that goes across both parts so you can detect even a small ...


1

You may also be able to get toilet bolts that screw into the wood. That is, if you have a wood floor under the flange.



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