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8

Removing the old pipe First you want to make sure the section of pipe that will remain, is properly supported (you don't want it falling). Then you'll want to install some temporary supports, to catch the portion of the pipe that you'll be removing. Use a chain cutter, hammer and cold chisel, or grinder to break the pipe a few inches before the hub on the ...


6

There isn't much allowance for raised flanges in most US toilets I've seen. The critical feature is how much higher the under toilet "ceiling" is than the bottom perimeter base that sits on the finished floor. Since this dimension is intended to work with a standard wax ring, there's little chance a 3/4" protrusion will work. Not only do you need physical ...


5

For cutting the pipe, go rent a chain pipe cutter (aka soil pipe cutter). It will make short work of the pipe and not be too messy. It will make a clean enough edge that a Fernco coupling (like you have a picture of) will work fine. Obviously you will need to add some strapping to secure the horizontal run of iron pipe if you go this route because you ...


5

You can purchase a toilet flange repair at any big box hardware store. Remove the wax ring (buy a new one), remove the bolts, and mount this on top of the existing broken flange: Then reattach the toilet as per normal, making sure not to over tighten. Tip, seat the toilet firmly on the wax ring before you tighten the bolts, and use a STANDARD sized wax ...


3

It probably doesn't matter much one way or the other since it's unlikely for water to get that far. I personally would not bother. Consider this: If water were to get that far, you would want to know about this and take action. If it's sealed, water could just sit there unnoticed, rotting out anything it touches. If it leaked down and stained the ceiling, ...


2

I can think of two other solutions depending on the whole picture: 1 - What kind of PVC 90 are you using to get from horizontal to vertical? If you are using a regular sweep 90 you might be able to switch to a street sweep 90 combined with a different flange that would glue to the outside of the 90. This may allow you to push the flange down farther to make ...


2

This will depend on several things: How are you securing your toilet, are you bedding in cement which will raise the pan off the floor anyway, or are you using a flexible sealant (silicon) and pan screws which will have the pan flush on the floor Does the pan you intend on installing have the outlet pipe recessed eg. if you turn the toilet pan upside down ...



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