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13

The only place tape is to be used is on threads, to be exact, tapered threads, the kind that are on pipe nipples, or the male threaded ends of valves for example. These are the kind that get tighter as you twist the parts together. If you look at the threaded end you can see the pipe is smaller at the end than farther down the length. Pipe dope can be used ...


12

If you're having the same problem I had, and it's a case of rubbing but the door could be forced closed (so it's just slightly off), I just made a note of where it was rubbing with a bit of crayon (wipes off easily), then took a small hand plane to shave down that area slightly. Unfortunately, I also made the mistake of passing off the plane to my house ...


7

I haven't seen one for a small diameter pipe, but what you're looking for is some type of drain flange: The top is wider to hold it in the opening, the rubber washer is below to seal the connection, and then you use a metal washer and a nut to tighten it to the surface. With a small diameter pipe, you can improvise this with a threaded pipe and a second ...


6

Very Important Make sure the joint is really clean when you solder - so use emery cloth or sandpaper to remove any contaminants in your solder joint and flux the joint prior to heating. I like to wipe the joint with acetone before applying flux but I'm anal retentive like that. Also you might want to consider using MAPP gas vs propane - those brass ...


6

If it hasn't been tightened many times, it should be okay to reuse. Clean off the mating faces thoroughly and don't use tape, putty, or anything else. And don't be gentle tightening: The seal is formed by forcing the surfaces together and "bending" them to mate. Even with threaded steel pipes, it can take a day or two for the tightened fittings to form a ...


5

Tape or dope should be used when the threads of a pipe are being used to create the seal. In a compression fitting, the ferrule is what creates the seal by deforming to the shape of the pipe. Similarly, some gas pipes use a flare fitting to make air-tight the connection.


5

You could attach a flange to the outside of the tray under the hole. (The flange shown would be turned upside down for this use, with the flat side pointing up) The flange can be attached using bolts with the heads on the inside of the tray and nuts under the flange. Seal the flange with silicon sealant. This does require a threaded pipe, but these are ...


5

This doesn't answer your exact question, but why not use a pair of 90 degree elbows to make an adjustable hinge. The first elbow would go vertical, and the second would return it horizontal. Then you can create any angle you'd like.


3

I think you want an automatic compressor drain. It essentially spurts out a little air (and some moisture/condensate with it) each time the compressor motor cycles on. When working properly, they eliminate the need to manually drain down the tank. http://www.paragoncode.com/shop/compressor/ has a good explanation of how to install the kit.


2

I would be cautious reusing this. Reason being if the surface has a slight indentation from the previous seat from the prior install, and the shape of that end is kind of half spherical, which allows the mating surfaces to change locations depending on the angle to pipe approaches its counterpart. If the surface is not marred from the prior install though, ...


2

I can't believe 3-6 inches is correct. Maybe 3/16 of an inch? (even that is pushing it). The easiest way to fix this is to take the door down and trim a bit off the top of the door. I'll usually just run the door through my table saw to trim it down, but a power planer would probably work better if you have one. Otherwise a hand planer will work too, but ...


2

Maybe you can fix some adhesive felt pads ( like you would use under furniture legs) to the back outside edges of your rack to compensate for the curve. These would act like wedges to bridge the bow and not scratch the plaster wall.


2

Part of the confusion is 'compression' is sometimes applied to fitting types that are not truly compression type. The term should only be applied to fittings where the compressive force is is applied by screw threads via part of the fitting itself as opposed to compressive force being applied by external tools. In this compression fitting, via the threads ...


1

The spacing you leave between the sheets of hardboard (or whatever other underlayment that you put down) will be determined from the manufacturer's instructions. Some materials need to have room for minor expansion over temperature and humidity ranges. If the proper gap is not left then the sheets of the material may buckle and create an uneven floor with ...


1

You really don't want to disturb the lath with a light fixture. The plaster is fragily 'keyed' into the gaps between the lath. The weight of the light must connect to structure. Ideally, the light fixture should be independent of the plaster. The plaster must be 'quietly' cut back. I use a continuous rim diamond wheel (4 1/2 inch on an angle grinder) to ...


1

Typically the solution at the bottom of the stairs is to use a quarter-round (Usually 3/4" thick) to cover the flooring and the bottom of the carpet. You'll need some long nails to get through the carpet, so it's best to pre-drill the nail holes so you don't split the trim. This is the best image I could find. It lacks carpet, but will demonstrate the ...


1

They exist, though maybe not in the material you would like I would go to a plumbing/HVAC supplier and ask.


1

I am not entirely sure what you would like to do but you can attach almost anything with steal putty or epoxy resin. Steal putty Epoxy Glue Both of which require to mix two parts into a single part (usually in equal parts) and they are non-toxic (but check the package before use) You can either mould over or around the pipe glueing it to the surface ...


1

You could use washers or some other variable width spacers to hold the knife board slightly away from the wall. My fear with using felt or other soft material, is that it will compress over time causing the board to become loose. So I would use something more rigid, like metal washers. When you hang the board put the mounting screws/bolts through the ...


1

If the problem is that the solder is not "pulling" into the joint it may not be hot enough (try using MAPP instead of propane in your torch). But I find the biggest help is to use lots of flux (aka soldering paste). Go crazy with it, use it really liberally.


1

Staple or tack the carpet to the bottom side of the tread above the broken tread, just past where you staple it, cut it with a sharp carpet knife and peal it back, fix the broken tread and then pull the carpet back in place and staple it back into place. Since all of the stapling and cutting will be on the underside of tread it shouldn't be very noticeable. ...



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