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12

I personally wouldn't recommend that you put this inside your house. If you really have something that gets that hot, I'd be looking into building a separate structure away from the main building. This was actually pretty typical in early America -- the kitchens of large homes were in an outbuilding, so should there be a fire, it only burned down the ...


7

1/2" drywall carries a 30 minute fire rating. This can be increased to 1 hour by upgrading to a fire-rated (Type X) 5/8" drywall. For a 2 hour wall, you can stack sheets one over another (stagger the seams). In your situation, I would probably do metal studs (which provide higher fire rating than wood). Add a double layer of Type X drywall, along with a ...


7

As best I know, a fire rated utility room isn't required by any code for a single family structure. And for multi-family (e.g. condos), this requirement is to isolate each residence from each other and from common/utility areas. So the below advice is completely overkill. For the room itself, you can use fire rated drywall. This is usually 5/8" thick, and ...


5

I might add that the primarily "fire rating" of wall and floor/ceiling assemblies is to allow occupants to safely exit the building, not to keep the building from burning down. The Type X gyp board affords some protection because the inherent moisture in the product can slow down the fire through your wall or ceiling. With these assemblies, you are basically ...


4

Anything beyond 5/8" fire rated drywall (which is rated for ~1 hr) is probably overkill, including metal studs. Even 1/2" drywall is rated for ~30 minutes -- in a residential setting I would tend to think it's enough. The most important things: Install a smoke and heat detector, and have it connected to the rest of the alarms in the house so if it's ...


2

This will likely be a location specific issue, so it doesn't hurt to check your local codes. All the fire rated work that I've done has been between units (both to other units and common areas) and any load bearing structures of a multi-unit dwelling. When we do that, fire blocking is installed in the ceiling space as well to prevent a fire from traveling ...


2

So I've learned that the poly is fire retardant, but it would be better not to expose it at all and use fireproof boards over all of it, instead. For the fans, I found a slight water leak on one, and now see that solar attic fans are probably the better route. I will consult an electrician to install some from Lowe's.


2

Brick and mortar box. Put drywall over brick if you want to hide it. Leave an opening so you can take things in and out. Can use an old fire oven door or something for the opening. I actually found the best place to do this is in a closet ceiling if you have attic space above. It doesn't have to look good so don't worry about the brick job - just make ...


2

Type X drywall, which is typically 5/8" thick (as opposed to 1/2") and contains fiberglass within the gypsum is typically used for fire protection. I believe it increases the burn through time to around 1 hour, and it increases the impact resistance (there's often falling debris in a fire). For further protection, every electrical junction box should be ...


2

OSB would be easier and faster, it gets installed BEFORE the top plate goes up. If you plan to use 2X4 framing set 1" away from the wall or if you follow the detail provided in another post, you can still use it as fireblocking. When you layout for your top plate and chalk your line for setting the top plate by, before you do, measure over to sill plate ...


1

You could add 5/8" (16 mm) sheetrock to the back of the door. That would make it a fire rated surface. If that matched up with the sheetrock at the right, it would be almost a continuous surface. If I had to live with it, that is what I would do. If it is to sell the house, the new owners either won't be used to the access or won't know about it. ...


1

The Fire separation wall between the adjoining condominium dwellings shall be one hour fire rated with fire exposure from both sides. This requires one layer of 5/8" thick fire rated, type X gypsum board on each side of the wall. If you are planning to remove existing regular gypsum board on your side, replace it with one layer of 5/8" thick, type X gypsum ...


1

This is going to depend on your local codes. I know around here (Grand Rapids, MI) fire rated drywall and fire blocking is required for a utility room containing a furnace. I'm surprised others are saying that it isn't required in their area. A google search finds me several sites that mention using fire rated drywall in utility rooms, which leads me to ...


1

Fire grade ceramic tiles sounds like overkill to me. You might only need about 50mm layer of concrete or screed to keep even fairly high fire temperatures out for 60 minutes because of the thermal inertia and relatively low conductivity of concrete. Edit Just re-read my answer here and I noticed I forgot to mention one thing. Although you can get away ...


1

You can install cement board on the subfloor and then any flooring you'd like on top of that. The cement board isn't that thick and is typically used to firm up the floor before installing tile, but you could put whatever you like on top. However, rather than making the place only able to contain the fire, I'd consider installing sprinkler heads in the ...


1

I say that you should wrap the walls of your room in fire brick, like a fireplace, and then let the demon roar free. :) This answer is partly for amusement, but also serious: do you want to slow down a fire, or actually make the room fire proof? How likely is it that things will get out of control?



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